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NEWS
September 20, 2010
Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio underwent surgery early Sunday morning after suffering from symptoms consistent with a heart attack. The school released a statement Sunday saying Dantonio was admitted to Sparrow Hospital and doctors performed a cardiac catheterization procedure, in which a small, metallic stent is used to open a blocked blood vessel leading to the heart. "The procedure was successful and blood flow to the heart muscle was restored," said Dr. Chris D'Haem through the school.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton recently received a gag gift of protective headgear after she suffered a concussion and blood clot near her brain after a fall. While Clinton can now make light of the injuries, a blood clot can be a serious health risk that can lead to death. Dr. James L. Frazier, III, a neurosurgeon at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, talks about the dangers. What causes a blood clot to form in the brain? A blood clot or thrombus can form in the arteries that supply blood to the brain.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton recently received a gag gift of protective headgear after she suffered a concussion and blood clot near her brain after a fall. While Clinton can now make light of the injuries, a blood clot can be a serious health risk that can lead to death. Dr. James L. Frazier, III, a neurosurgeon at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, talks about the dangers. What causes a blood clot to form in the brain? A blood clot or thrombus can form in the arteries that supply blood to the brain.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
A federal jury convicted a retired Eastern Shore cardiologist Tuesday of health care fraud and related charges for placing unnecessary coronary stents in the arteries of dozens of patients, then billing private and public insurers hundreds of thousands of dollars for the procedures. John R. McLean, 59, who surrendered his medical privileges at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in 2007 after a hospital investigation, faces a maximum of 35 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Nov. 10, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
A federal jury convicted a retired Eastern Shore cardiologist Tuesday of health care fraud and related charges for placing unnecessary coronary stents in the arteries of dozens of patients, then billing private and public insurers hundreds of thousands of dollars for the procedures. John R. McLean, 59, who surrendered his medical privileges at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in 2007 after a hospital investigation, faces a maximum of 35 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Nov. 10, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office.
FEATURES
By Marie McCullough and Marie McCullough,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 1996
Hope is growing that the damage caused by a stroke may soon be minimized -- or even averted.Instead of standing by, almost powerless to intervene as stroke injures the brain, physicians will be able to give medications that protect the brain and restore vital blood flow.The first emergency drug for strokes caused by blood clots was approved in June by the federal Food and Drug Administration. The drug is called tissue plasminogen activator, or TPA. Dozens of other drugs are now in testing.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | March 3, 2006
Do over-the-counter painkillers raise blood pressure? Some do, at least in women. In a study published last year in Hypertension, a journal of the American Heart Association, researchers from the Nurses' Health Study looked at the records of more than 5,000 female nurses ages 34 to 77. They found that those who took 500 milligrams or more a day of acetaminophen - such as Tylenol - were twice as likely to develop high blood pressure as those who didn't....
SPORTS
June 14, 1991
The California Angels placed Fernando Valenzuela on the 15-day disabled list yesterday after a treadmill test revealed abnormal blood flow in the region of his heart.The exam, a follow-up of his initial physical when he signed with the club last week, showed an abnormal cardiogram, team spokesman Tim Mead said.Valenzuela's agent, Tony De Marco, downplayed the report, saying, "Fernando . . . feels very normal. He's going to play golf [today]."Valenzuela is 0-2 with a 12.25 ERA.* REDS: Eric Davis will be out for seven to 10 days with a hip flexor strain.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
Every year, nearly 12 million American heart patients are wired up and put on bikes or treadmills for stress tests, designed to reveal how well blood flows to their heart muscle. In 75 percent of those tests, doctors inject a radioactive tracer into the bloodstream, and a gamma-ray camera reveals how well the blood flows into the coronary arteries during both rest and exercise. These "nuclear" stress tests show constricted blood vessels or dark spots - evidence of muscle scarring from past heart attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Tucked in between restaurants and clubs at Power Plant Live is a nondescript corridor that leads to something very, well, descript — the always lively Maryland Art Place and its latest exhibit, "Young Blood. " This show, featuring works by nine recent Masters of Fine Arts degree recipients from the Baltimore area, provides a visual adventure that starts at the front door with a mixed-media installation. Sarah McNeil's "Manchine" reflects what she describes as "concepts of philosophical toys and psychological machines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Tucked in between restaurants and clubs at Power Plant Live is a nondescript corridor that leads to something very, well, descript — the always lively Maryland Art Place and its latest exhibit, "Young Blood. " This show, featuring works by nine recent Masters of Fine Arts degree recipients from the Baltimore area, provides a visual adventure that starts at the front door with a mixed-media installation. Sarah McNeil's "Manchine" reflects what she describes as "concepts of philosophical toys and psychological machines.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
Marc Miller survived a motorcycle crash in October near his Baltimore County home, but his foot had been dragged along the pavement and badly damaged. That injury would require both the most advanced medicine and an ancient therapy — leeches. Trauma doctors at Johns Hopkins, the University of Maryland and other U.S. hospitals routinely use leeches as a temporary measure to keep blood flowing as new vessels grow in a damaged area. The animals kept blood moving in and out of a new skin flap sewn onto Miller's foot.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio underwent surgery early Sunday morning after suffering from symptoms consistent with a heart attack. The school released a statement Sunday saying Dantonio was admitted to Sparrow Hospital and doctors performed a cardiac catheterization procedure, in which a small, metallic stent is used to open a blocked blood vessel leading to the heart. "The procedure was successful and blood flow to the heart muscle was restored," said Dr. Chris D'Haem through the school.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2010
Dr. Nicholas J. Fortuin, a Johns Hopkins Hospital cardiologist who did early research in cardiac ultrasound and was recalled as a gifted teacher, died Sunday near his home in the Caves Valley section of Baltimore County. Family members said he had been bicycling. He was 69. "For generations of cardiology trainees at Hopkins, he came to epitomize clinical judgment and skill, and he brought to their education a healthy skepticism of new fads in a technology-prone specialty," said a close friend, Dr. Thomas Traill, a Hopkins cardiologist.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
Every year, nearly 12 million American heart patients are wired up and put on bikes or treadmills for stress tests, designed to reveal how well blood flows to their heart muscle. In 75 percent of those tests, doctors inject a radioactive tracer into the bloodstream, and a gamma-ray camera reveals how well the blood flows into the coronary arteries during both rest and exercise. These "nuclear" stress tests show constricted blood vessels or dark spots - evidence of muscle scarring from past heart attacks.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | March 3, 2006
Do over-the-counter painkillers raise blood pressure? Some do, at least in women. In a study published last year in Hypertension, a journal of the American Heart Association, researchers from the Nurses' Health Study looked at the records of more than 5,000 female nurses ages 34 to 77. They found that those who took 500 milligrams or more a day of acetaminophen - such as Tylenol - were twice as likely to develop high blood pressure as those who didn't....
FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 21, 1992
It produces elegant pictures of slipped discs and brain tumors, reveals the inner structure of the eye and ear, captures torn ligaments and cartilage -- even displays the neurological decay of multiple sclerosis.Magnetic resonance imaging, a technique performed by cylindrical machines the size of pickup trucks, has revolutionized medical diagnosis ever since it first appeared in the medical marketplace a decade ago.The imagers, which have sprouted in dozens of hospitals and private clinics throughout Baltimore, have always done an excellent job producing high-resolution pictures of organs and tissues.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
The man was 64 years old, and he suffered a heart attack in the emergency room at Carroll County General Hospital one Saturday.The medical staff stopped the attack with injections that dissolved a blood clot blocking the flow of blood to the man's heart.A few days later, the patient was on a table in the hospital's new cardiac catheterization laboratory. Above, a video monitor produced a black-and-white tracery of blood vessels stretched over the heart that radiology technologist Carlon Carson describes as "like trees in the winter."
BUSINESS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2001
EntreMed Inc., which already had patent protection for its anti-cancer protein Endostatin, said yesterday that the government has issued a broader patent protecting the company from competitors developing therapies using other flagments of the same protein. "We were very, very keen to see this patient issued because we knew there were other researchers" developing drugs from the Endostatin protein, said Joanna Horobin, the company's senior vice president for commercial development. The EntreMed drug is a fragment of that protein.
NEWS
By Kate Doyle | May 3, 1998
Death came to Guatemala last Sunday night in the form of a brutal and anonymous assassin. It struck one of the country's finest, Bishop Juan Gerardi Conedera, crushing his skull with a cement block. It left behind nothing but blood.Forty-eight hours before his murder, Gerardi, 75, was standing before an audience of thousands in Guatemala's National Cathedral, declaring an end to the savage violence that has ripped the country apart for so long. His death is a signal that Guatemala's violent past still haunts its search for peace.
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