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By DANIEL DYER | April 2, 1991
The aqueduct took a year to complete. From the cool mountains in the North it traveled 1,000 miles, transporting life-sustaining water to the sweltering South. Every 100 yards, gargoyle spouts permitted people to draw sustenance from this river of life. It was an engineering marvel.But all was not well. On the day of completion, no water ran in the aqueduct, and the people in the South were dismayed. Would relief never come?A courier arrived with grim news: War had broken out in the North.
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NEWS
Jean Marbella, Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Red-eyed and slurring his words, Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps had a blood alcohol level of 0.14, well above the state limit of 0.08, when he was arrested and charged with drunken driving Tuesday morning after leaving the Horseshoe Casino in downtown Baltimore, according to court documents. Phelps, 29, failed two roadside sobriety tests and was asked to perform a third involving balancing on one leg, according to the documents, but told the officer, "That's not happening. " The swimmer, who returned to competition last year after retiring in 2012 as the most decorated Olympian of all time, is scheduled for trial on Nov. 19 in Baltimore City District Court.
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NEWS
By Victor Herbert | January 15, 1999
THE RECURRENT blood shortages in the United States, including the one in January 1999, which create periodic medical crises when the nation's blood supply falls perilously short, is a problem with a simple solution. Don't throw away good blood!The blood banking industry influenced the FDA to stigmatize and promote discarding the greatest source of donated blood in this country, namely that of Americans with iron overload, or hemochromatosis. Blood industry leaders allege (with no confirming data)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Tonight is the night that we say goodbye to the people and supes of Bon Temps, La., forever. We open up with Sookie and Bill - the end of this show is mirroring the beginning. He's come over to talk about his decision to die. He's waxing all nostalgic. Her living room is the first place where he “called” on her, meeting Jason and their grandmother. She's confused because “nostalgia and suicide don't mix.” Basically, Bill is realizing the same thing that Angel realized with Buffy: Vampires and humans can't have long-term relationships.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
As Fable, a 5-year-old Newfoundland, lies on a table at the Baltimore Humane Society in Reisterstown, she doesn't seem to notice the needle in her jugular vein. Instead, the pooch blissfully licks peanut butter from the hand of her owner, Lauren Schneider, while a handler cradles her with his whole body. Fable and her sister, Kenzie, are canine blood donors - and veterinarians and animal advocates say the world needs more of them. The dogs' blood was going to a major university and an emergency animal hospital in other states, where it's in high demand.
NEWS
December 13, 1993
Red Cross officials have sent out an urgent alert: Blood supplies for the region are dangerously low. For some types of blood the need is critical; as of last week, the Red Cross had less than one day's supply of O negative blood.This time of year, blood banks expect a drop in donations, as regular donors get busy with holiday activities or leave town on vacation. But the demand for blood doesn't take a season off. The situation is worse this year because the fall months were less busy than usual.
NEWS
May 21, 1991
Red Cross officials assure the public that the blood supply is "safer than ever." But the changes the organization announced over the weekend suggest that the system is not yet safe enough. Blood transfusions have always carried some risk of infection, but before AIDS the risk was rarely life-threatening. Now, when blood contaminated with the virus can be a death sentence for a recipient, the resulting strain on the system of collecting, testing and distributing blood has been enormous.The Red Cross, which provides half the nation's blood supply, deserves great credit for taking steps to institute a new computerized system and other procedures to prevent the slip-ups that have recently drawn criticism from Congress.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | May 2, 1999
Blood, blood, blood, blood.Probably not what you want to think about first thing in the morning. But a lot of people have no choice. They depend on someone else's blood to keep them alive.They're not the folks you might think."If you'd ask people where the blood supply is needed, they'd say car accidents and shootings," says Dr. Merlyn Sayers, chief executive of a Dallas blood center. "What does not capture headlines is that, on any one day, there might be 300 patients with malignancies who are needing transfusions."
NEWS
January 15, 1992
Forty percent of Americans are eligible to donate blood, but only 5 percent do.The Evening Sun wants to know whether you donate blood, and if not, why not?To respond, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, you'll be asked to punch in a four-digit code on your Touch-Tone phone. The code is 4600. The results will be published tomorrow."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
By BARBARA EHRENREICH | May 14, 1993
One doesn't have to be an admirer of mass rape to experience a sick, sinking feeling at the prospect of U.S. intervention in Bosnia.Well, perhaps one does feel a sneaky bit of respect for the Serbian militiamen, who have managed to take the somewhat forbidding institution of genocide and deindustrialize it, bringing it down to human scale and potentially within reach of every neighborhood council and block committee.For what man has not, at some point, gazed upon his neighbor's house or car or wife, and thought: Jeez, a couple rounds of automatic fire and all that could be mine, with the power saw thrown in!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Only a few more episodes of “True Blood” await us, which is fortunate, because I am over this series. When we left off, Violet was kidnapping children, Bill and Sookie were having sex and Sarah Newlin was holed up in the Fellowship of the Sun having a series of hallucinations. At the top of the episode, Sarah is still cowering inside the Fellowship. Finally accepting that she is going to die, Sarah goes out to meet Eric, Pam and the Yakanomo Corp. goons, welcoming death. Eric pounces, holding her by the neck as he prepares to kill, until Pam stops him by pointing a wooden bullet-loaded gun at her own heart.
FEATURES
By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A new facial is gaining popularity around Baltimore, and while it won't make you live forever, some doctors and patients say it will make you look younger - at least for a few months. The vampire facial, a nonsurgical procedure made famous by celebrities like Kim Kardashian, uses a patient's blood to stimulate healing and regenerate cells. "After healing, my skin just seemed smoother," said Grace Ban, an Odenton resident who received the procedure to reduce the appearance of acne scars and minimize the wrinkles around her eyes.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 30, 2014
A blood test that monitors changes in one specific gene may someday allow doctors to predict those likely to attempt suicide. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University identified a chemical alteration linked to stress reactions and plan more studies. Monitoring blood could some day help doctors more easily determine if intervention is necessary for service members returning home or the needs of those seeking psychiatric care. And blood tests could also be used to identify people who can't tolerate certain medications that lead to suicidal thoughts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The final season of "True Blood" is here, and after three seasons  of definite misses, only the most devoted of fans (or those of us who  feel a compulsion to complete things) are here. Let's dive right in,  since the show does. The Set-Up Sick vampires are running amuck in Bon Temps, an unfortunate side  effect of the hep V-poisoned "True Blood" from last season. The federal  government is only really protecting major cities, making towns like Bon Temps easy pickings for the “Hep Vs.” The first 2.5 minutes of the s eason opener is a giant fight scene at Mayor Sam Merlotte's (!
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 18, 2012
Large doses of Vitamin C may moderately reduce blood pressure, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. But the scientists don't recommend people start taking large amounts of the vitamin. Researchers led by Dr. Edgar "Pete" R. Miller, an associate professor in the division of general interal medicine at Hopkins, reviewed and analyzed data from 29 previous  clinical trials and found that taking 500 milligrams of Vitamin C daily, or five times the recommended amount, could lower blood pressure by 3.84 millimeters.
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