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By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | March 9, 2003
On Blondes, by Joanna Pitman. Bloomsbury. 320 pages. $24.95. I was the sole blonde in my class at the small Catholic girls' school I attended. Each year when the class photo was taken for the year book I was singled out by the photographer to be the center of the photo -- the student pointing to the map, the blackboard, the art exhibit -- with all of my non-blond classmates as my audience. A sun and her (no doubt resentful) satellites. Joanna Pitman would be unsurprised by this recounting, nor similar stories I or other blondes might have to tell.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | July 15, 2014
Given the penchant of many of my fellow Americans to believe any preposterous spoof, spin or allegation that pops up on their computer screens -- I'm talking to you, Victoria Jackson! -- I want to make it perfectly clear that every statement in the next paragraph is false, no matter how much you may want to believe it's true. President Barack Obama visited a mosque and hosted Muslim leaders at the White House on the Fourth of July (false!). Obama also plans to host a Muslim gay marriage ceremony for St.
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NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | August 6, 2000
The bleach only stung a little. The dryer made him break into a sweat. And he wasn't quite sure what he would see once the job was done. After getting a very small taste of the punishments many women undergo regularly in the name of good hair, newly blond Alex Beitel, 14, catches a glimpse of himself in the mirror, jumps slightly and proclaims: "Whoa!" The former brunet breaks into a huge smile and runs his hands through his spiky rock star-esque 'do. "I think it looks cool," he says.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
An African-American woman is alleging she was fired from the Baltimore Inner Harbor Hooters' restaurant for having an "unnatural" hair color, according to a complaint filed with Maryland Commission on Civil Rights. Farryn Johnson, 25, claims her supervisors said her blond highlights violated the appearance policy for "Hooters Girls," according to her attorney, Jessica P. Weber of Brown, Goldstein & Levy LLP. When Johnson pointed out that other waitresses had obviously dyed hair -- an Asian-American woman had bright red hair and a white woman had black hair with platinum highlights -- her supervisors said her hair was "not natural" because she was African-American, according to the complaint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Heller and Karen Heller,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | November 16, 2003
This is how you, an average mortal, know when a movie star is being serious, and wants to be taken seriously as an "actress": She dyes her hair dark. Correction: She stops dyeing her hair blond. Goes back to her roots. Literally. And removes half her makeup. In other words: She starts to look a lot like an average mortal. These are the dark months of Hollywood, when movie stars become serious actresses, letting their roots and the circles beneath their eyes grow dark, all in an effort to have Oscar gold brighten their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2005
I woke up and got one of my idiotic moods. -- Brad Pitt, explaining his new short-cropped, dyed-blond hair to the Associated Press
NEWS
By Barbara M. Simon | October 8, 1991
Ten years ago today Daddy died.October when more than leaves turn.When gray mists weave over fieldsof browning corn; when milkweedbursts and squat pumpkins grinferocious benedictions from porches,and lovers walk under buttermilk skies.Sorrows red as leaves turn in me,ghosts of all that's gone. My fatherover six feet tall and blond, bigand laughing, kind hands holding me,a book, his mandolin, his faithdeep as October's shadows.He taught me to love autumnwhen there are no promises, when beautyof red and gold, amber and blue remain,All we have to enrich us, to let us be.October turns and I turn into a woman,turn into my father, blond and laughing,kind hands holding my child, a future.
FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewicz | February 6, 1992
Natural redheads have always been something of a rarity, but lately more and more women are seeing red.But is it the right hair color for you? While there are no hard and fast rules -- and anyone thinking of making the change should first consult a professional -- here are some guidelines:* Does your hair pick up red highlights naturally in the sun? If so, experts say it's the best indication that you can make a successful transition to red.* Blonds: First consider a light red tone instead of plunging into the deeper shades.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee | December 12, 1990
For 31 years, Barbie has been the best-selling American doll with all the trappings that brings -- her own dream home, a dune buggy, even a live rock band impersonating her and her friends. Now the diminutive fashion role model has two more prizes in possessions "Barbie Fashion" and "Barbie," comic books published monthly by Marvel Comics starting this month.The new comic strip Barbie is drawn by Anna Maria Cool with cascading blond curls and a figure that's less voluptuous than the real plastic Barbie's.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 29, 1994
Q: I like ponchos. To me, as a comfortably sized woman, they are both practical and chic. I hear they are back in fashion, and I want a new one that will go everywhere over anything and also look good. Any suggestions?A: I don't think ponchos ever go out of fashion. They were surely one of the first garments made by man, and they've been around ever since.Malaysian-born designer Yeohlee, who is best known for the clean architectural cut of her coats, is also a poncho fan."A good poncho must function and yet have style," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Here's what we like to see at Midnight Sun: A trusted local brewery collaborating with nearby farms to create something new. Frederick's Flying Dog announced last week that it has teamed up with Jefferson's Distillery Lane Ciderworks and Purcellville, Va.'s Breaux Vineyards for two small-batch beers. The Orchard Ale was made with fresh-pressed apple juice from Distillery Lane, and the Vineyard Blonde - a Belgian-inspired ale - was made with Vidal Blanc grape juice from Breaux Vineyards, according to Flying Dog's director of communications, Erin Weston.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
"Legally Blonde: The Musical" proves to be an ideal production for Children's Theatre of Annapolis, following the troupe's promise to provide professional on-stage opportunities for young performers. In its second main stage play of the 2012-2013 season, the Children's Theatre's talented teen cast stretches to new horizons in this lively show. Based on the 2001 movie starring Reese Witherspoon and Luke Wilson, the 2007 musical by Laurence O'Keefe and Nell Benjamin has audiences rooting for Elle Woods, a young woman who knows what she wants and ultimately uses her determination, intelligence and savvy to get it. The show opens as UCLA Delta Nu sorority president Elle — portrayed by Broadneck High School sophomore Colleen Coleman — has a dinner date with boyfriend Warner Huntington III, played by Annapolis Area Christian School junior Zeke Quellette Elle expects Warner to propose marriage, but instead he tells her she has no place in his future and he's going to Harvard Law School.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
In its summer offering of the award-winning hit "Legally Blonde — The Musical," Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia has a light-hearted, fast-paced romantic comedy. Toby's production, the area premiere of Laurence O'Keefe's and Nell Benjamin's musical, has us rooting for Elle Woods, who knows who she is and what she wants and uses her smarts to win back her boyfriend. Five-time Helen Hayes Award nominee Mark Minnick serves as director and choreographer. Minnick has directed and choreographed national and international productions, including "Grease" in Istanbul and Macau.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
In a 1913 vaudeville show that toured the country, one routine featured a melodically undistinguished Tin Pan Alley song called "And Then." It wouldn't have made much of an impression, except for the startlingly suggestive spin put on it by a 20-year-old woman named Mae West when she sang such lines as: "He saw me home last evening all alone; of course, I asked him to come in. Oh, joy! Some boy!" For the rest of her life, West served as the ultimate innuendo machine, a slow-speaking, forcibly curvaceous, almost supernaturally blond symbol of everything that decent folks warned you against.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Ladies and gentlemen of the jury: The roughly 40,000 of you who will visit the Hippodrome Theatre in the next two weeks will deliberate on a controversial case. You must carefully weigh the evidence and render a verdict on whether Legally Blonde: The Musical is a tasteless rip-off or a clever homage. I submit that, despite some mitigating factors to the contrary, the creative team of the stage show should be convicted of aesthetic violations. With two exceptions, the score runs the gamut of vapid to bland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
When Natalie Joy Johnson strides on stage at the Hippodrome on Tuesday for the opening night of Legally Blonde: The Musical, she will be channeling inspiration from a rather unlikely spot - the Hair Studio, a lavender-walled salon in an unassuming strip mall in Arbutus. For more than three decades, Johnson's mother and aunt have cut hair at the cozy salon while talking their clients through love, loss and shades of lipstick. As a teenager, Johnson worked here on weekends, sweeping up snipped strands, rinsing perms and answering phones.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | February 28, 1999
I started dyeing young.At 17, my coloring compulsion began. I bagged my virgin brown and went red. Bright red.Little did I know, as I sat in the colorist's chair for the first time, that I would emerge a hair-dye junkie.Part of the obsession was, and still is, rooted in exhibitionism: the power to turn other heads with my own. From red to purple, to orange to magenta, to the blondest of blonds and everything in between.But after so long, my shock ceased to be shocking.I could play a screen saver on my hair and no one would notice.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Just the sight of Amy Noble taking the field with her Severna Park field hockey teammates can be a little scary for the opposition.She is 5 feet 10, very athletic, is extremely skilled in all phases of the game, has a reputation for being a big scorer and has striking blond hair that makes her hard to miss on the field."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 1, 2008
Billy Pappas spent nearly 8 1/2 years on one drawing. He knows about obsession. "I can't just be an artist with modest success," he says about halfway through Waiting for Hockney, a documentary showing at this weekend's Maryland Film Festival, chronicling the near-decade he spent trying to commit a single image of Marilyn Monroe to paper. "I've got to be Michelangelo." How well Pappas compares to Michelangelo is for others, and for posterity, to decide. But Waiting for Hockney certainly paints a portrait of an artist with a singular, unique vision, and Pappas was willing to endure almost anything to realize it. To its great credit, director Julie Checkoway's film goes beyond the creative process.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Orioles position players aren't required to report until Tuesday, but Aubrey Huff already has been pumping his legs on a stair climber in the tiny weight room near the clubhouse entrance. The rock music blaring from a radio is the proper audio accompaniment for a ballplayer whose red hair has been bleached blond. "I used to get it done when I was struggling and it never helped," he said. "I figured that I'd try it now and see what happened." Maybe Huff just needed to find something in his life that he could go back and change.
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