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By G. Jefferson Price III | August 29, 2004
BLOCK ISLAND, R.I. -- There was a time when this island off the coast of Rhode Island was closer to the news of the day, more critically engaged in momentous events. But it was a long time ago. Giovanni da Verrazzano, the Italian explorer, is said to have noted the place around 1524 and named it Claudia, honoring the mother of France's King Francis I. But he didn't bother setting foot on the island. This probably suited its Indian inhabitants just fine, as their later encounters with the white man were not happy.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
Date: Sept. 7 Her story: Shannon Hanley, 31, grew up in Sparks. She works in the sales department as an implement coordinator at HFS Benefits in Hunt Valley. Her parents, Patrick and Eileen Hanley, live in Sparks. His story: Paul Sortino, 29, grew up in Towson. He is a certified financial planner for small businesses at Worthington Financial Partners in Hunt Valley. His parents, Steve and Denise Sortino, live in Towson. Their story: Shannon and Paul met as elementary school students at Immaculate Conception School in Towson, though their families already knew each other - Shannon's mom went to elementary school with Paul's dad and high school with Paul's aunt.
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FEATURES
By Nina Tassi and Nina Tassi,Special to The Sun | July 24, 1994
Block Island, R.I. -- The Narragansett Indians long ago named this beautiful patch of land forested in oak, hickory and cedar Manisses: Isle of the Little God. Although no longer a true wilderness, this tiny island retains much of the dreamy, unspoiled aura of its ancient past.Twelve miles south of mainland Rhode Island, the Isle of the Little God is now prosaically named Block Island, after a Dutch trader who landed there in 1614. A place of many moods, from gentle meadows to fierce rocky bluffs, Block Island lures lovers who stage weddings by the sea and world-class cyclists thrilled by breathtaking ravines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Paul Alvarez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 20, 2013
Some cravings will not be ignored. Deny yourself for too long, and the craving may become an obsession. The foods we crave are often regional specialties that are seemingly out of reach - a Philly cheese steak, barbecue pulled pork, red velvet cake or a big bowl of New England clam chowder. Luckily, you don't have to set the GPS and gas up the car to get what you want. We've found local chefs who are preparing these classics with authenticity - and willing to share their recipes, so you can have what makes you happy on your Baltimore food staycation.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
Date: Sept. 7 Her story: Shannon Hanley, 31, grew up in Sparks. She works in the sales department as an implement coordinator at HFS Benefits in Hunt Valley. Her parents, Patrick and Eileen Hanley, live in Sparks. His story: Paul Sortino, 29, grew up in Towson. He is a certified financial planner for small businesses at Worthington Financial Partners in Hunt Valley. His parents, Steve and Denise Sortino, live in Towson. Their story: Shannon and Paul met as elementary school students at Immaculate Conception School in Towson, though their families already knew each other - Shannon's mom went to elementary school with Paul's dad and high school with Paul's aunt.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and By Sarah Clayton,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
To step onto the Block Island ferry is to step onto a time machine. In the 45 minutes it takes the ferry to go from Point Judith on the Rhode Island mainland to what the native Narragansett Indians called Manisses (Island of the Little God), time drifts like mist back over a hundred years to the late 19th century, when tourists suddenly began to pour into this 7-by-3-mile strip of land. Until then, it had been a sleepy backwater of farmers and fishermen -- much as it still is today in the winter.
TRAVEL
By MARY BETH GETKA | July 2, 2006
Barefoot at last, I delight in the freedom of walking in the cool sand in search of the perfect spot to drop anchor -- my anchor being an oversized tote bag filled with the necessities for a day lazing on a glorious stretch of beach on Block Island, R.I. The beach is peppered with passengers from the first ferry of the day to arrive from New London, Conn. -- my fellow shipmates who came directly to the beach. I, however, first stop briefly at the petting zoo to admire a camel from afar and pet a docile donkey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
You'd expect a Baltimore restaurant to compete in crab cake competition, but Thames Street Oyster House is contending for a big lobster roll prize. The event is Tasting Table's third annual Lobster Roll Rumble, which will take place in New York City on June 7. You can take a look at event information and photographs of all 20 contenders here So, how did a Baltimore restaurant come to have a contending lobster roll. Turns out chef Eric Houseknecht stayed in Providence after graduating form Johnson & Wales University.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 19, 2007
From the craggy promontories of Block Island, R.I., to the "American utopia" of Chautauqua, N.Y., the creative genius of humankind asserts itself. And there is time to marvel. Herewith, a paean in five parts to the elixir of time off. 1. Change agent. Violinist Aaron Dworkin is a walking billboard for diversity. Born to an Irish Catholic mother and a black Jehovah's Witness father, and the adopted son of a Jewish couple in New York, Mr. Dworkin learned music at the foot of an immigrant teacher, a man whose daily command to him was: "You no talk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Paul Alvarez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 20, 2013
Some cravings will not be ignored. Deny yourself for too long, and the craving may become an obsession. The foods we crave are often regional specialties that are seemingly out of reach - a Philly cheese steak, barbecue pulled pork, red velvet cake or a big bowl of New England clam chowder. Luckily, you don't have to set the GPS and gas up the car to get what you want. We've found local chefs who are preparing these classics with authenticity - and willing to share their recipes, so you can have what makes you happy on your Baltimore food staycation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
You'd expect a Baltimore restaurant to compete in crab cake competition, but Thames Street Oyster House is contending for a big lobster roll prize. The event is Tasting Table's third annual Lobster Roll Rumble, which will take place in New York City on June 7. You can take a look at event information and photographs of all 20 contenders here So, how did a Baltimore restaurant come to have a contending lobster roll. Turns out chef Eric Houseknecht stayed in Providence after graduating form Johnson & Wales University.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 19, 2007
From the craggy promontories of Block Island, R.I., to the "American utopia" of Chautauqua, N.Y., the creative genius of humankind asserts itself. And there is time to marvel. Herewith, a paean in five parts to the elixir of time off. 1. Change agent. Violinist Aaron Dworkin is a walking billboard for diversity. Born to an Irish Catholic mother and a black Jehovah's Witness father, and the adopted son of a Jewish couple in New York, Mr. Dworkin learned music at the foot of an immigrant teacher, a man whose daily command to him was: "You no talk.
TRAVEL
By MARY BETH GETKA | July 2, 2006
Barefoot at last, I delight in the freedom of walking in the cool sand in search of the perfect spot to drop anchor -- my anchor being an oversized tote bag filled with the necessities for a day lazing on a glorious stretch of beach on Block Island, R.I. The beach is peppered with passengers from the first ferry of the day to arrive from New London, Conn. -- my fellow shipmates who came directly to the beach. I, however, first stop briefly at the petting zoo to admire a camel from afar and pet a docile donkey.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III | August 29, 2004
BLOCK ISLAND, R.I. -- There was a time when this island off the coast of Rhode Island was closer to the news of the day, more critically engaged in momentous events. But it was a long time ago. Giovanni da Verrazzano, the Italian explorer, is said to have noted the place around 1524 and named it Claudia, honoring the mother of France's King Francis I. But he didn't bother setting foot on the island. This probably suited its Indian inhabitants just fine, as their later encounters with the white man were not happy.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and By Sarah Clayton,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
To step onto the Block Island ferry is to step onto a time machine. In the 45 minutes it takes the ferry to go from Point Judith on the Rhode Island mainland to what the native Narragansett Indians called Manisses (Island of the Little God), time drifts like mist back over a hundred years to the late 19th century, when tourists suddenly began to pour into this 7-by-3-mile strip of land. Until then, it had been a sleepy backwater of farmers and fishermen -- much as it still is today in the winter.
FEATURES
By Nina Tassi and Nina Tassi,Special to The Sun | July 24, 1994
Block Island, R.I. -- The Narragansett Indians long ago named this beautiful patch of land forested in oak, hickory and cedar Manisses: Isle of the Little God. Although no longer a true wilderness, this tiny island retains much of the dreamy, unspoiled aura of its ancient past.Twelve miles south of mainland Rhode Island, the Isle of the Little God is now prosaically named Block Island, after a Dutch trader who landed there in 1614. A place of many moods, from gentle meadows to fierce rocky bluffs, Block Island lures lovers who stage weddings by the sea and world-class cyclists thrilled by breathtaking ravines.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | August 31, 1992
Bear with me, please. Been out of town and by that I mean out of touch. Totally. Completely. Almost irretrievably.Problem with going to a place like Block Island, a 10-square-mile chunk of beauty off the coast of Rhode Island and Connecticut at the end of the Long Island Sound, is sports is not a priority. An educated guess is sports ranks somewhere down there between the price of a sleigh ride in Siberia and the pollen count in Queensland, Australia.It was the third night on "The Other Block" before I caught glimpse of a television set. From across a street, through a bar window and it was tuned to PBS.The first boat from the mainland arrived at about 9 a.m. daily and there was such a rush for the dozen or so newspapers on board that the two markets in the village had them out for sale by about 3 p.m. -- a day old, to boot.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Otis M. "Jim" Long, a retired Maryland state trooper who survived the sinking of his aircraft carrier during World War II, died Thursday at Harbor Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 87. The son of Nathaniel O. Long and Vera M. Long, Otis Melrose Long, who was known as Jim, was born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a student at John Marshall High School in Richmond, when he withdrew his senior year to enlist in the Navy. He later earned his General Education Development diploma.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | August 31, 1992
Bear with me, please. Been out of town and by that I mean out of touch. Totally. Completely. Almost irretrievably.Problem with going to a place like Block Island, a 10-square-mile chunk of beauty off the coast of Rhode Island and Connecticut at the end of the Long Island Sound, is sports is not a priority. An educated guess is sports ranks somewhere down there between the price of a sleigh ride in Siberia and the pollen count in Queensland, Australia.It was the third night on "The Other Block" before I caught glimpse of a television set. From across a street, through a bar window and it was tuned to PBS.The first boat from the mainland arrived at about 9 a.m. daily and there was such a rush for the dozen or so newspapers on board that the two markets in the village had them out for sale by about 3 p.m. -- a day old, to boot.
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