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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 2003
UNITED NATIONS -- The chief United Nations weapons inspector demanded yesterday that Iraq start destroying within a week its al-Samoud 2 missiles and any illegally imported engines designed for use in the rockets, which U.N. experts say exceed the allowed range of 92 miles. The demand from Hans Blix, with its March 1 deadline, appeared to set the stage for a diplomatic showdown over the next two weeks that could determine whether Iraq faces war. The United States and Britain continued yesterday to press for a brief resolution -- to be presented next week -- declaring Iraq in breach of its disarmament obligations.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration rejected a United Nations role in the search for Iraq's weapons of mass destruction yesterday, brushing aside arguments that international inspectors are needed to lend credibility to any discoveries. Ari Fleischer, the White House spokesman, said the United States and key allies would hunt down Iraq's banned weapons. He added that military-led investigators would ensure that any discoveries are beyond dispute. "Make no mistake about it," Fleischer said.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2003
WASHINGTON - United Nations inspectors reported yesterday that Iraq was slightly improving its cooperation in their search for weapons of mass destruction, giving France, Russia and Germany new energy in their demands for more time for inspections and forcing the United States to back away from seeking a new U.N. resolution authorizing war. In a much anticipated report, Hans Blix, one of two chief U.N. inspectors, told the Security Council that Iraq...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - Acknowledging that U.S. credibility is on the line, the Bush administration is considering enlisting United Nations weapons inspectors to verify any discovery by American military teams of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. The role that U.N. inspectors should now play in Iraq, if any, is expected to be sharply debated in a closed-door Security Council meeting today, when inspections chief Hans Blix gives his first report since before the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. The United States has no intention of giving the United Nations a major role in the search for Iraq's banned weapons, which is already being conducted by U.S. military teams and experts and will be bolstered in coming weeks by hundreds of additional people, officials said.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - Seven weeks of inspections in Iraq have failed to turn up any "smoking guns," but Iraq still might be hiding prohibited weapons in "dark corners or caves" and has failed to provide credible evidence that it has disarmed, a top United Nations inspector said yesterday. Hans Blix, who heads the search for chemical and biological weaponry and missiles, told the U.N. Security Council that the access Iraq had granted to inspectors so far did not amount to satisfactory cooperation.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration rejected a United Nations role in the search for Iraq's weapons of mass destruction yesterday, brushing aside arguments that international inspectors are needed to lend credibility to any discoveries. Ari Fleischer, the White House spokesman, said the United States and key allies would hunt down Iraq's banned weapons. He added that military-led investigators would ensure that any discoveries are beyond dispute. "Make no mistake about it," Fleischer said.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - Acknowledging that U.S. credibility is on the line, the Bush administration is considering enlisting United Nations weapons inspectors to verify any discovery by American military teams of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. The role that U.N. inspectors should now play in Iraq, if any, is expected to be sharply debated in a closed-door Security Council meeting today, when inspections chief Hans Blix gives his first report since before the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. The United States has no intention of giving the United Nations a major role in the search for Iraq's banned weapons, which is already being conducted by U.S. military teams and experts and will be bolstered in coming weeks by hundreds of additional people, officials said.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - The chief U.N. weapons inspector told the United Nations Security Council yesterday that Iraq has not accepted the need to disarm, even to avoid war, and could possess thousands of chemical weapons, thousands of gallons of a germ warfare agent and missiles that exceed the permitted range. Hans Blix's tough critique prompted the United States to demand that the Security Council "face its responsibilities" and decide whether to confront Iraq or "make itself irrelevant." In Washington, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell again warned that if other nations refuse to act, the United States is prepared to go to war alone.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the face of what they say is Iraq's failure to disclose key information about its weapons programs, American officials are increasing pressure on United Nations weapons inspectors to interview Iraqi scientists, preferably abroad. But the scheme is fraught with potential problems, not limited to the rage and fright that would be set off in Baghdad if the regime's weapons secrets were about to be revealed. First is the human dimension. So notoriously brutal is President Saddam Hussein's security apparatus that Iraqis with damaging information to spill would fear retribution not only against their immediate families but against others in their clans or home villages.
NEWS
October 30, 2002
HANS BLIX, the chief weapons inspector for the United Nations, couldn't be plainer in explaining the necessity for a tough Security Council resolution on disarming Iraq. For his teams to do a rigorous and forthright job, they need unequivocal support from the council of nations and an unambiguous warning about the consequences if Baghdad defies them. The United States this week quickly embraced Mr. Blix's opinion as support for its position about how best to proceed against Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
March 8, 2003
The following is an excerpt of chief U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix's report to the U.N. Security Council: On 14 February, I reported to the Council that the Iraqi side had become more active in taking and proposing steps, which potentially might shed new light on unresolved disarmament issues. Even a week ago, when the current quarterly report was finalized, there was still relatively little tangible progress to note. Hence, the cautious formulations in the report before you. As of today, there is more.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 28, 2003
UNITED NATIONS -- The Bush administration's drive toward war with Iraq grew more complicated yesterday evening when Iraqi officials agreed "in principle" to comply with a U.N. order to begin dismantling scores of prohibited missiles. Chief U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix had ordered the destruction of Iraq's Al Samoud 2 missiles to begin by tomorrow. Many diplomats were awaiting Saddam Hussein's response as a test of his willingness to comply with U.N. mandates to disarm. Though it was not clear that Iraq's acceptance was unconditional, the development seemed likely to strengthen the stand of those, led by France, calling for more U.N. weapons inspections and opposing President Bush's push toward war. Earlier yesterday, Bush portrayed the missile issue as little more than a distraction.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 2003
UNITED NATIONS -- The chief United Nations weapons inspector demanded yesterday that Iraq start destroying within a week its al-Samoud 2 missiles and any illegally imported engines designed for use in the rockets, which U.N. experts say exceed the allowed range of 92 miles. The demand from Hans Blix, with its March 1 deadline, appeared to set the stage for a diplomatic showdown over the next two weeks that could determine whether Iraq faces war. The United States and Britain continued yesterday to press for a brief resolution -- to be presented next week -- declaring Iraq in breach of its disarmament obligations.
NEWS
February 15, 2003
The following is an excerpt of chief weapons inspector Hans Blix's remarks to the United Nations Security Council. In my Jan. 27 update to the council, I said that it seemed from our experience that Iraq had decided in principle to provide cooperation on process, most importantly prompt access to all sites and assistance to UNMOVIC [the U.N. Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission] in the establishment of the necessary infrastructure. This impression remains, and we note that access to sites has so far been without problems, including those that had never been declared or inspected, as well as to presidential sites and private residences.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2003
WASHINGTON - United Nations inspectors reported yesterday that Iraq was slightly improving its cooperation in their search for weapons of mass destruction, giving France, Russia and Germany new energy in their demands for more time for inspections and forcing the United States to back away from seeking a new U.N. resolution authorizing war. In a much anticipated report, Hans Blix, one of two chief U.N. inspectors, told the Security Council that Iraq...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - The two chief United Nations weapons inspectors said yesterday that they had not achieved a breakthrough in meetings in Baghdad and that their visit failed to produce the swift movement toward Iraqi disarmament demanded by the United States to slow the momentum toward war. But Hans Blix and Mohamed ElBaradei both declared that Iraq was "beginning" to cooperate more seriously in disclosing information about its suspected programs for weapons...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - The United States is working to derail plans by a top United Nations weapons inspector for months of further inspections in Iraq, pressing him instead to intensify his efforts to expose alleged Iraqi deception between now and his next report to the U.N. Security Council late this month, administration officials said yesterday. U.S. officials have called on inspector Hans Blix to scrap plans for a subsequent report to the council in March and plan to tell other council members today that without Iraqi cooperation, the whole inspections process will be of little use. "Immediate, active cooperation and a final opportunity for Iraq to disarm - that should be the focus," a senior administration official said yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 17, 1992
BEIJING -- The head of the International Atomic Energy Agency said yesterday that a mysterious building in North Korea, if outfitted with additional equipment, could function as a plutonium reprocessing center, the core of a nuclear weapons program.Hans Blix, the director general of the agency, just returned from a six-day visit to North Korea. He is the first Westerner known to have visited the sprawling laboratory in Yongbyon, 60 miles north of the capital, Pyongyang.The laboratory is the focus of suspicions about North Korea's nuclear intentions.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 9, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The two chief United Nations weapons inspectors indicated they were encouraged last night after meeting with Iraqi officials about sharply raised expectations for what Iraq must produce to prove it no longer has weapons of mass destruction. Their visit came two days after President Bush declared that "the game is over," suggesting that there was little Iraq could do, at this late moment, to deter an American attack. Still, the inspectors, Hans Blix and Mohamed ElBaradei, who advocate a longer inspections mission as an alternative to war, appear to see hope, but only if Iraq makes a serious move toward compliance with U.N. resolutions in the talks this weekend - offering harder evidence, for example, to back its claims that it no longer possesses anthrax or the VX nerve agent.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A senior Iraqi official said yesterday that Iraq was prepared to do more to aid United Nations arms experts but provided few specifics and said his country no longer has weapons of mass destruction. "We have cooperated fully," Gen. Amir Rashid said. "We are ready to cooperate more." Rashid, Iraq's former oil minister, held to a familiar line that "Iraq has been free of any mass destruction weapons since the end of 1991, and all the inspections have proven this fact." He also accused the United States and Britain of interfering with the inspections.
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