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BUSINESS
June 28, 1994
Blinder joins Fed as vice chairmanEconomist Alan Blinder was sworn in yesterday as vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, the Fed said.Mr. Blinder, who was a member of President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers, was confirmed Friday by the Senate. He replaces David Mullins, who resigned in February.Mr. Blinder, sworn in by Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan at a private ceremony, will participate at the July meeting of the Fed's interest rate-setting Open Market Committee.@
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | April 27, 2012
When UMBC tangles with America East rival Binghamton in Vestal, N.Y., this Saturday night at 7, conference leader Stony Brook and Albany will face off at the same time just 140 miles to the northeast. If the Retrievers (5-6 overall and 3-1 in the league) win and the Seawolves (4-9. 3-1) lose, UMBC will capture the regular-season title and the top seed and homefield advantage in the America East Tournament. For the record, Retrievers coach Don Zimmerman said he will not be seeking updates on Stony Brook from his assistant coaches during his team's contest against the Bearcats.
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NEWS
September 19, 1994
Hard on the heels of academic warnings that inflationary pressures in the economy are sharper than generally perceived, financial markets are shaky in anticipation of still more boosts in interest rates before the end of the year. These developments come at an awkward time for the Federal Reserve Board, where philosophical differences between chairman Alan Greenspan and vice chairman Alan Blinder are beginning to surface.Mr. Greenspan, the ultimate inflation hawk, has even urged a change in the law to make inflation control the sole mission of the nation's central bank.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- Pyro has been going about his business, galloping on the racetrack, schooling in the paddock, unconcerned about who sees him in the barn being given a bath. And in his barn at Keeneland, assistant trainer Scott Blasi, who has been with Pyro for the horse's entire professional career, said he isn't worried about the competitors in today's Grade I, $750,000 Blue Grass Stakes. "All we can do is train our horse," Blasi said. "I have no idea what anyone else is doing. Shaun [Bridgmohan, Pyro's jockey]
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy is definitely slowing but no recession is in sight, Federal Reserve Board Vice Chairman Alan Blinder said yesterday."There are now downside risks that simply were not there several months ago," Mr. Blinder said in an interview.What's more, he said, the slowdown should prevent the economy from overheating, despite recent signs that inflation may be flaring up again. He professed little concern over yesterday's report that consumer prices rose 0.4 percent in April.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 23, 1995
Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve, and Vice Chairman Alan Blinder have talked in recent days about the possibility of lowering interest rates when the Fed's policy-makers meet July 5 and 6, senior Fed officials said yesterday.The conversations come amid signs of a steadily slowing economy. Yesterday, for example, the Labor Department reported that first-time claims for jobless benefits shot up last week to 395,000, the highest level in 17 months.Mr. Blinder has publicly expressed concern that the economy might be weakening more than is necessary to control inflation.
NEWS
November 12, 1991
Thomas H. HedrickFormer state delegateA memorial service for Thomas H. Hedrick, a former member of the Maryland House of Delegates who practiced law for more than 50 years, will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the First and Franklin Street Presbyterian Church, Park Avenue and Madison Street, where he was an elder.Mr. Hedrick, who lived in the 2 Charles Center Apartments, died Nov. 3 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital after an apparent heart attack. He was 81.He shared an office with John O. Herrmann, a University of Maryland law school classmate, and earlier was associated with the firm of Maloy and Brady.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan raised the possibility yesterday of a brief U.S. recession, but stressed the long-term health of the economy in terms that the financial markets took as a signal that no imminent cuts in interest rates were planned.Commenting on an abrupt economic slowdown, which he called "very pronounced," Mr. Greenspan acknowledged that "as a consequence of the sluggish economic outlook, the probabilities, some of my colleagues have indicated, of a recession have edged up, as indeed one would expect."
NEWS
May 22, 1994
Maryland's Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes has never seen an interest-rate hike he doesn't hate. During his quarter-century in Congress, a lease he hopes to renew in November, he has been as consistent a voice for easy money as the free-silver populists of yore. Each time the Federal Reserve has nudged up interest rates since February, the TV networks knew where to look for sound-bite criticism.There is little point in trading statistical thrusts with Mr. *~ Sarbanes. For every indicator showing the economy is strong and growing smartly, he can find signs of softness.
NEWS
August 18, 1994
Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes reacted predictably -- i.e. negatively -- to the latest increase in short-term interest rates ordered by a unanimous Federal Reserve Board acting, for the first time, with two Clinton appointees aboard. "I think it's bad for the economy," the Maryland Democrat declared, "and if it's bad for the economy it's bad for elected officials." Mr. Sarbanes is a three-term-senator seeking a fourth six-year term in November.Of course, the senator is right. No "elected official," especially one involved in a political campaign, is going to go around stumping for higher interest rates.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | September 3, 2007
ATLANTA -- Despite the harsh partisanship that had begun to infect politics by the 1990s, there was at least one tenet about which mainstream Democrats and Republicans agreed: Globalization is good. The wonders of free markets have been touted by Democrats Robert E. Rubin and Lawrence Summers as well as Republicans Carlos Gutierrez and Henry M. Paulson Jr. Belief in the glories of global markets is widely shared - a civic religion, especially among the chattering classes. As with most religions, however, its miracles are exaggerated.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
For the time being, a judge's order barring Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. from publicizing its plan to defer part of a 72 percent increase in customers' electricity bills may make a very confusing situation even cloudier. But that is only the unfortunate byproduct of a very important legal effort by the city of Baltimore to force the state Public Service Commission to reconsider this rate increase plan - this time taking into account the critical but so far unasked question of whether the utility and its parent, Constellation Energy Group, can absorb a bigger chunk of the higher electricity costs.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | December 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - Bernard Kerik might not have been the dream candidate for homeland security secretary that most of us imagined when the president first announced his nomination, but disqualifying him for the job because he hired an illegal alien should give pause to lawmakers and citizens alike. Whether we care to admit it or not, most of us benefit from the services of illegal aliens, even if indirectly, and the law that ensnarled Mr. Kerik has turned many good people into scofflaws. There are some 12 million illegal aliens living - and working - in the United States, which makes lawbreakers of the millions of otherwise law-abiding Americans who hire illegal immigrants as nannies, housekeepers, gardeners, painters, carpenters and for other odd jobs.
NEWS
October 27, 2003
ONE OF Maryland's most ordinary yet sublime pleasures is slowly being taken away. It's that brief but sensual moment of release that comes about a third of the way over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge from Annapolis to the Eastern Shore. Past the toll booths, at the end of a long, uphill climb, the bridge curves left, levels out and suddenly the huge expanse of the bay and shore beyond comes into view. Hit that point on Memorial Day weekend, and summer officially begins. State transportation officials fear bridge drivers are enjoying that moment a bit too much.
NEWS
October 5, 2003
LESS THAN A MONTH after the City Council primary, and the bad old days are back. Promises to end business as usual have already been forgotten. Even while the council is ostensibly going about the business of plugging loopholes in the city's ethics law covering all municipal employees, council members are clueless, blind or worse about their own breaches of ethical conduct. When the city's ethics board disclosed Thursday that it is considering an amendment that would allow City Council incumbents to continue employing family members already on the public payroll, the prospect was greeted with audible sighs of relief.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - I don't mean to discount the fact that dozens of people were injured and that 21 of them died. But for all the talk about Monday's stampede at a Chicago nightclub, about the fight that started it, the use of pepper spray that reportedly exacerbated it and the legal actions already growing out of it, one detail - minor, but telling - has largely escaped comment. According to CNN, club goers were panicked by screams that the melee was a terrorist strike and that the pepper spray was poison gas. If anything better illustrates the state of the union, I don't know what it could be. Unless maybe it's all those empty hardware store shelves where duct tape used to be. We are, to put it plainly, jittery.
BUSINESS
By Louis Uchitelle and Louis Uchitelle,New York Times News Service | August 18, 1994
NEW YORK -- In raising interest rates on Tuesday, the Federal Reserve invoked a belief that is dogma on Wall Street and often challenged elsewhere -- that the U.S. economy is not capable of moving toward more prosperity now.That view is not stated so baldly. Softer language is used. The nation does not have enough qualified workers to supply a stronger economy, the argument goes. Nor are there enough factories, machinery and computers, or enough steel and other materials used in manufacturing.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | September 3, 2007
ATLANTA -- Despite the harsh partisanship that had begun to infect politics by the 1990s, there was at least one tenet about which mainstream Democrats and Republicans agreed: Globalization is good. The wonders of free markets have been touted by Democrats Robert E. Rubin and Lawrence Summers as well as Republicans Carlos Gutierrez and Henry M. Paulson Jr. Belief in the glories of global markets is widely shared - a civic religion, especially among the chattering classes. As with most religions, however, its miracles are exaggerated.
NEWS
August 8, 1998
A WORTHY ACT of Maryland aid to drought- and fire-stricken zTC farmers in Florida has been crushed by federal bureaucrats.Maryland farmers wanted to ship bales of hay to Florida farmers who had lost their crops to the natural disasters. The Maryland Farm Bureau began mobilizing the relief effort, with a goal of more than 200,000 bales of livestock fodder.But the hay is standing in fields registered with the federal Crop ++ Reserve Program, which pays farmers to take fields out of production.
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