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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After questions yesterday about mone Hillary Rodham Clinton holds in a mutual fund that has invested in health-related stocks, the White House announced that the president and his wife had decided weeks ago to put their assets into a blind trust and have nearly finished the process."
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NEWS
By Mary Curtius and Jonathan Peterson | September 24, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice are investigating Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist's sale of all his stock in HCA - a hospital chain his family helped found - shortly before a disappointing earnings report triggered a drop in the stock's value, Frist's office said yesterday. The SEC and Justice Department declined to comment on the focus of the investigation. But the Nashville-based HCA said in a statement issued yesterday that federal prosecutors issued a subpoena late Thursday night seeking "the production of documents" that the company believes "relates to the sale of HCA stock" by Frist.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 15, 1993
ST. LOUIS -- PaineWebber Group Inc. and its subsidiaries have paid more than $2.4 million to settle complaints against a former employee named in a lawsuit by Sen. Christopher S. Bond, securities industry records show.Mr. Bond, a Republican from Missouri, accused broker William J. Reik Jr. of mishandling and losing $1.3 million in a blind trust that Mr. Reik managed from 1985 through early 1991.The suit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in St. Louis, names PaineWebber Group, its PaineWebber Inc. brokerage unit, its Mitchell Hutchins Asset Management unit and Mr. Reik as defendants.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
HUBRIS (hyoobris): n. Overbearing pride or presumption; arrogance. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger has got it. And a lot of explaining to do. In a Wednesday story, Sun reporters Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Nitkin pointed out the convergence of the public and private lives of the Baltimore County executive who is weighing a race for governor of Maryland. What is troubling about the disclosures is the degree to which Mr. Ruppersberger has shown arrogant disregard for the principle that a public official should avoid even the appearance of a conflict of interest.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
HUBRIS (hyoobris): n. Overbearing pride or presumption; arrogance. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger has got it. And a lot of explaining to do. In a Wednesday story, Sun reporters Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Nitkin pointed out the convergence of the public and private lives of the Baltimore County executive who is weighing a race for governor of Maryland. What is troubling about the disclosures is the degree to which Mr. Ruppersberger has shown arrogant disregard for the principle that a public official should avoid even the appearance of a conflict of interest.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | April 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- George and Barbara Bush saw their family income triple last year to $1.3 million, thanks to whopping sales of "Millie's Book," an autobiographical tale ghost-written for the first dog.But while the president and his wife donated all their after-tax book profits to charity, it did not begin at home.Despite recent protests, the first couple continued to take advantage on their 1991 tax returns of provisions that allow them to avoid paying income taxes to Washington, D.C., or to either of the two states -- Texas and Maine -- where they also have residences.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
In an effort to keep its state license and a coveted multimillion-dollar state contract, lawyers for PrimeHealth Corp. announced yesterday that its principal owner had resigned from the board of directors and placed his stock in a blind trust.In a letter to state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, PrimeHealth attorney Warren N. Weaver said that Dr. Christian E. Chinwuba, who owns 81 percent of the Prince George's County company, "no longer exercises any degree of control" over the operation of the health maintenance organization.
NEWS
By Mary Curtius and Jonathan Peterson | September 24, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice are investigating Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist's sale of all his stock in HCA - a hospital chain his family helped found - shortly before a disappointing earnings report triggered a drop in the stock's value, Frist's office said yesterday. The SEC and Justice Department declined to comment on the focus of the investigation. But the Nashville-based HCA said in a statement issued yesterday that federal prosecutors issued a subpoena late Thursday night seeking "the production of documents" that the company believes "relates to the sale of HCA stock" by Frist.
FEATURES
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF Staff writer Tom Bowman contributed to this article | December 23, 1998
Ten months after news of the presidential sex scandal broke, President Clinton has been impeached. Kenneth Starr continues his investigation. Monica Lewinsky has lined up a book contract and exclusive TV interview. And Linda Tripp remains the odd woman out.Her role in exposing the scandal that has led to the president's impeachment has left Tripp at the bottom of public opinion polls. Seen as disloyal and a tattletale for her actions in taping one-time friend Lewinsky, she is shunned by some longtime neighbors and friends and is largely confined to her suburban Columbia home, unable even to return to her Pentagon office.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1994
Rockville lawyer James B. Moorhead kicked off his campaign for Maryland comptroller yesterday with a broadside attack on Louis L. Goldstein, the nine-term incumbent he will face in the September Democratic primary.Resurrecting old news accounts of Mr. Goldstein's lucrative real estate deals, Mr. Moorhead charged that the comptroller has "used his office to enrich himself, making millions of dollars since he was elected in 1958."Mr. Moorhead, 40, a former federal prosecutor and first-time office-seeker, then called on Mr. Goldstein to place his personal financial holdings in a blind trust to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest.
FEATURES
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF Staff writer Tom Bowman contributed to this article | December 23, 1998
Ten months after news of the presidential sex scandal broke, President Clinton has been impeached. Kenneth Starr continues his investigation. Monica Lewinsky has lined up a book contract and exclusive TV interview. And Linda Tripp remains the odd woman out.Her role in exposing the scandal that has led to the president's impeachment has left Tripp at the bottom of public opinion polls. Seen as disloyal and a tattletale for her actions in taping one-time friend Lewinsky, she is shunned by some longtime neighbors and friends and is largely confined to her suburban Columbia home, unable even to return to her Pentagon office.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
In an effort to keep its state license and a coveted multimillion-dollar state contract, lawyers for PrimeHealth Corp. announced yesterday that its principal owner had resigned from the board of directors and placed his stock in a blind trust.In a letter to state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, PrimeHealth attorney Warren N. Weaver said that Dr. Christian E. Chinwuba, who owns 81 percent of the Prince George's County company, "no longer exercises any degree of control" over the operation of the health maintenance organization.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After questions yesterday about mone Hillary Rodham Clinton holds in a mutual fund that has invested in health-related stocks, the White House announced that the president and his wife had decided weeks ago to put their assets into a blind trust and have nearly finished the process."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 15, 1993
ST. LOUIS -- PaineWebber Group Inc. and its subsidiaries have paid more than $2.4 million to settle complaints against a former employee named in a lawsuit by Sen. Christopher S. Bond, securities industry records show.Mr. Bond, a Republican from Missouri, accused broker William J. Reik Jr. of mishandling and losing $1.3 million in a blind trust that Mr. Reik managed from 1985 through early 1991.The suit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in St. Louis, names PaineWebber Group, its PaineWebber Inc. brokerage unit, its Mitchell Hutchins Asset Management unit and Mr. Reik as defendants.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | April 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- George and Barbara Bush saw their family income triple last year to $1.3 million, thanks to whopping sales of "Millie's Book," an autobiographical tale ghost-written for the first dog.But while the president and his wife donated all their after-tax book profits to charity, it did not begin at home.Despite recent protests, the first couple continued to take advantage on their 1991 tax returns of provisions that allow them to avoid paying income taxes to Washington, D.C., or to either of the two states -- Texas and Maine -- where they also have residences.
NEWS
By William Safire | August 17, 1993
IN THE weeks before Vincent Foster's death, he was working on overcoming ethical concerns about one of Hillary Rodham Clinton's assets by putting the Clintons' financial holdings into a blind trust.The guilt-ridden deputy counsel may have mishandled a potential conflict of interest in Value Partners, an investment group in which Mrs. Clinton held nearly 1 percent; her estimated share is $100,000.The partnership was about 14 percent invested in health care stocks at last year's end; it had "short" positions in companies, betting their prices would drop.
NEWS
December 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Vice President Dan Quayle, under attack for helping to ease government restrictions on industry, accused his critics yesterday of taking an "attack mode" just because they don't get their way.Mr. Quayle said the Council on Competitiveness, a White House panel he chairs, is "on the people's side" and fighting "for rationality and common sense in a town that's biased in favor of more and more regulation."The council is under investigation by three congressional committees probing its relaxation of restrictive proposals affecting such matters as factory emissions, wetlands protection and federal drug approval.
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