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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 4, 1997
WHO KNEW, Mr. Magoo? Who knew, until this week, that you were a cartoon character of ridicule? Who knew that you were "an ill-tempered and incompetent blind man," rather than an eccentric, avuncular and nearsighted old guy with a knack for causing accidents without being injured in them?Once upon a time, we laughed.But, it turns out, not everyone thought Mr. Magoo was funny.Blind people, many of whom were kids when Mr. Magoo had his own television show, were glad to see him retire in the late 1960s.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Gordon Gund is the CEO of a venture capitalist fund, the former principal owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers and a member of the Kellogg Co.'s board of directors. He has also been blind for more than 40 years. On Saturday, Gund announced that his family plans to give $50 million or more in matching gifts to the Foundation Fighting Blindness, a Columbia-based nonprofit that he co-founded. "Our family is committed to finishing the job we helped start, and we hope this Challenge requires us to match as much as is needed to fast-track progress for promising treatments from the lab to clinical trials," Gund said in a statement.
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NEWS
July 24, 1993
At the Inner Harbor on Monday, Hank Dekker will unfurl a big hunk of canvass to create a vibrant message, but he's no artist.He's a sailor. He's also blind. And when he sets off from Baltimore to England to accomplish the first solo passage of the Atlantic by a blind person, he wants to embolden other blind people and to sensitize the sighted world. The 58-year-old Californian wants to complete the 3,450-mile crossing in three weeks. He has twice crossed the Pacific solo, the only blind sailor to accomplish that feat.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
While blind people can browse the Internet through a variety of means, there is often one thing that stops them cold - a security feature known as a CAPTCHA that's designed to distinguish human users from robots. CAPTCHAs, in which a user must identify the letters in a distorted image, are commonly used to block automated bots from grabbing up all the tickets for an event, signing up for thousands of email addresses in a short period of time or unfairly swaying the results of an online poll.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 4, 1992
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Debra Lyles strides briskly about Central Piedmont Community College, her head high, her left hand gripping the harness of her guide dog Treasure.fTC She was 5 when a playground accident took her sight. Now she's 33, a divorced mother of three.Ms. Lyles once was a teacher's aide in a class for the mentally retarded. She tried working as a salesclerk but couldn't find bar codes. Now she is unemployed.She always wanted to be a lawyer. In six years, she plans to be one. It's a long haul from the community college to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte to law school, but she says, "Determination will get me where I want to go."
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
William Poole, blind since the age of 9, elected not to vote yesterday after deciding that a new technology used to cast ballots in Baltimore County could not protect the secrecy of his vote.Election officials in Towson worked with Mr. Poole for nearly a half-hour on a computerized voting system to find a way for the 38-year-old unemployed actor to vote without jeopardizing his confidentiality. In the end, however, he couldn't be sure of not making a mistake on his own and did not want to tell someone his choices and have that person cast his vote for him."
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | December 24, 1991
Blind Industries and Services of Maryland must submit to an independent audit of its books and programs, but its current management will continue to control the quasi-public organization, a Baltimore judge ruled yesterday.Last Tuesday, the attorney general's office asked Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan to take control of the organization and appoint a receiver to temporarily run it. The attorney general charged that there were administrative and financial abuses at the agency and "evidence of misspent and misapplied funds."
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
While blind people can browse the Internet through a variety of means, there is often one thing that stops them cold - a security feature known as a CAPTCHA that's designed to distinguish human users from robots. CAPTCHAs, in which a user must identify the letters in a distorted image, are commonly used to block automated bots from grabbing up all the tickets for an event, signing up for thousands of email addresses in a short period of time or unfairly swaying the results of an online poll.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1996
An experimental, Braille voting device will let blind voters cast secret ballots Tuesday, in Maryland's first attempt to provide a way for some of the state's 2,100 blind people to vote without human assistance.If it works, the system -- developed after complaints from a blind voter about lack of privacy -- will be expanded across Maryland for 1998 state and local elections, said Gene Raynor, administrator of the State Administrative Board of Election Laws.As of Tuesday, any blind Second Congressional District resident in Baltimore County can arrange to vote at the Towson precinct that uses the device by calling the Baltimore County Board of Elections at 887-5700.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
A white cane means independence for a blind person.Ten thousand canes mean even more.Four blind workers who have been employed part time for Baltimore-based Blind Industries and Services in Maryland will work full time to assemble canes under a $200,000 contract with the National Federation of the Blind of Baltimore.Other workers might be hired later."This is a landmark day for us, the blind working for the blind," said Frederick J. Puente, president of Blind Industries, at 2901 Strickland St., the state's largest employer of blind people.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for increasing clouds and a high temperature near 90 degrees. Tonight is expected to be cloudy, with a 60 percent chance of rain and a low temperature around 73 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Rawlings-Blake names panel to look for Bealefeld replacement : The mayor's office said the panel will conduct interviews of internal and external applicants and recommend finalists to Rawlings-Blake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
Probing ahead of him with his cane, Roger Williamson crossed the Everyman Theatre stage, picked upa human skull that doubled as a candy dish and poked his fingers through the eye sockets. Moments later, he ran his hands over a papier-mache mask described as resembling Eleanor Roosevelt or, alternately, Helen of Troy. At the same time, another blind theater lover was pounding out "Chopsticks" on a xylophone on the stage's second level, while a third was operating the lever of an antique printing press, circa 1937.
EXPLORE
February 6, 2012
If marriage was a right, then any two people could simply declare themselves to be married, and that would be it. In fact, a couple who wants to marry first needs to get society's permission, in the form of a marriage license. Then, the couple has to go to someone legally authorized to bind them in matrimony (a clergyman, a justice of the peace, a ship's captain, etc.). Only after that legally authorized person has performed the wedding ceremony is the couple married. That having been said, any homosexual man can apply for a license to marry a woman, and any lesbian can apply for a license to marry a man. Assuming there are no problems (for example, if nothing shows up in the blood tests)
NEWS
By Marc Maurer | August 10, 2008
Many Marylanders may not realize it, but blind people like to skate, and many know how to take to the ice safely. For years, the local affiliate of the National Federation of the Blind has held its annual convention at a hotel in Ocean City that features an ice skating rink, and the blind convention participants enjoy the rink along with other hotel guests without problems. Blind skaters use their canes on the ice, just as when walking, in order to avoid colliding with other skaters and to observe the boundaries of the skating area.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | November 30, 2007
Betsy A. Zaborowski, who had been diagnosed with retinal blastoma at a young age and later became blind, devoted her entire life to fighting the notion that blindness is a tragedy. Dr. Zaborowski, former executive director of the National Federation of the Blind Jernigan Institute in Baltimore, died early yesterday of cancer at her Denver home. The former Ednor Gardens resident, who had moved to Colorado only this week, was 58. It was Dr. Zaborowski's wish that she return to the new Denver home that she and her husband had purchased last month, and on Tuesday, she left Baltimore for the last time aboard an air ambulance.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | February 5, 2007
Kenny Rich launches his ball down the alley, then turns his face to the ceiling as the pins crash. A strike, and he raises his arms in triumph. Then he turns his attention to the next lane, where Paul Hamm has just failed to pick up his spare. "I felt the breeze," Rich says, letting out a deep belly laugh, "but I didn't hear any pins go down." Mixing encouragement with a pinch of trash-talking, the bowlers sound like competitors in any other league. But the scene at AMF Dundalk Lanes is a little unusual.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
For the last three years, the question has been this: Who should run a 1,000-square-foot convenience store at the local Veterans Medical Center? The veterans canteen service or a blind contractor.Now, the answer is up to a federal judge.The dispute centers on two federal laws. One gives blind people a preference in running snack bars, convenience stores or cafeterias in all federal buildings. The other, some argue, gives the choice of vendors at its hospitals solely to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | September 3, 1994
Blind Industries and Services of Maryland, which has suffered from huge losses and layoffs in its sewing and papermaking divisions in recent months, has opened its first new business venture in years -- a two-person laser printer cartridge recharging operation.The 86-year-old nonprofit corporation dedicated to training and employing blind Marylanders won a one-year contract from the state government to rebuild about 1,200 laser printer cartridges for $31.25 apiece.Jim Miller, manager of the project at BISM's Baltimore headquarters, said yesterday he hopes to win other printer cartridge recharging contracts to create two more jobs next month.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
The workshops at the American Association of the Deaf-Blind's national conference this week will include sessions on career development, new communications technologies and how to interact with the public. There will be classes in parenting, owning a business and starting a local program to develop volunteer helpers for those unable to see or hear. But William Suggs Jr. has come for something more basic. "I just wanted to see the different kinds of people and find out how they're doing," the 36-year-old Baltimore man, deaf since birth and going blind, said yesterday through a sign-language interpreter.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2002
Astronomer Kent Cullers has spent most of his life studying the cosmos. But until recently the 53-year-old had never seen it. Cullers, who has been blind since birth and served as the model for a character in the Jodie Foster film Contact, knew all about nebulas, neutron stars and other heavenly objects through his work at the SETI Institute in California. But it wasn't until his fingertips swept across the pages of an innovative new book of Hubble Space Telescope photographs that he understood what other astronomers saw when they peered at the heavens.
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