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NEWS
September 4, 2014
Anne Arundel County Police say a man who is legally blind was attacked and robbed as he walked along a street in Severn early Thursday. Police said at about 12:35 a.m., officers were called to the 8500 block of Pioneer Drive in Severn for report of strong arm robbery. There a 25-year-old man, who is legally blind, told officers that he was walking along Pioneer Drive when he was attacked by multiple suspects - one grabbed the man from behind and began to choke him while another when into the victim's pocket and removed an undisclosed amount of cash.
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
Anne Arundel County Police say a man who is legally blind was attacked and robbed as he walked along a street in Severn early Thursday. Police said at about 12:35 a.m., officers were called to the 8500 block of Pioneer Drive in Severn for report of strong arm robbery. There a 25-year-old man, who is legally blind, told officers that he was walking along Pioneer Drive when he was attacked by multiple suspects - one grabbed the man from behind and began to choke him while another when into the victim's pocket and removed an undisclosed amount of cash.
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NEWS
January 9, 2014
It was with dismay that I read the anecdote involving a blind man used by Diane Brown in her opinion article on Megyn Kelly [Jan. 2].  Brown's interpretation of her encounter with the blind man leads me to conclude that Brown may suffer from the same inability to "see" demonstrated by Kelly. Brown summarizes an incident involving a blind man who provided aid to a group of women requiring auto repair assistance.  When asked about his blindness, the man replied:  "It's OK, at least I'm not black.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
It was with dismay that I read the anecdote involving a blind man used by Diane Brown in her opinion article on Megyn Kelly [Jan. 2].  Brown's interpretation of her encounter with the blind man leads me to conclude that Brown may suffer from the same inability to "see" demonstrated by Kelly. Brown summarizes an incident involving a blind man who provided aid to a group of women requiring auto repair assistance.  When asked about his blindness, the man replied:  "It's OK, at least I'm not black.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A 62-year-old blind man has filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice claiming Baltimore paramedics refused to allow his service dog to accompany him in an ambulance after he was struck by a car. Curtis Graham Jr., a Marine who served in Vietnam, was on his way to the city's Veterans Day parade on Nov. 11 when he was hit by a car near his West Baltimore home. Paramedics would not allow Indo, his 2-year-old golden Labrador retriever, into the ambulance, Graham said. "They refused to take a service animal who I need very much," said Graham, who suffered minor injuries.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
A 47-year-old Ellicott City man was arrested Wednesday afternoon, accused of stealing a $75 cane from a blind man, repeatedly kicking him and beating him with his own cane on a bus outside Columbia Mall, Howard County police said.James Arthur Mitchell of the 8600 block of Town and Country Blvd. was charged with resisting arrest, assault with intent to commit robbery, theft, robbery and two counts of assault, police said. He was being held yesterday on $50,000 bond at the Howard County Detention Center.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 4, 1997
WHO KNEW, Mr. Magoo? Who knew, until this week, that you were a cartoon character of ridicule? Who knew that you were "an ill-tempered and incompetent blind man," rather than an eccentric, avuncular and nearsighted old guy with a knack for causing accidents without being injured in them?Once upon a time, we laughed.But, it turns out, not everyone thought Mr. Magoo was funny.Blind people, many of whom were kids when Mr. Magoo had his own television show, were glad to see him retire in the late 1960s.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
Looming city budget and job cuts dominated questions fielded last night by Mayor Martin O'Malley from an audience of about 300 at a community forum in Govans. Among the concerns was the city's proposed closing of six child care centers for school-age children. "I do not plan on having my son as a latchkey kid," said Sophia Hurt, a federal employee who said she leaves her 9-year-old son at a center at Waverly Elementary School before commuting to Washington. Several custodians in the Department of Recreation and Parks protested a city plan that might move their jobs to the private sector, but O'Malley assured them the city most likely would be able to find them other jobs.
NEWS
May 29, 1995
Poor HeadlineI was appalled by The Sun's choice of headline ("Leading The Blind," May 16) for Suzanne Wayson's thoughtful letter about problems at the Maryland School for the Blind.The full reference is to Matthew 15:14: "They are like blind guides of blind men. But if a blind man guide a blind man, both fall into a pit."The contemporary phrasing, "the blind leading the blind," whether interpreted literally or metaphorically, has equally derogatory connotations.I suspect the headline writer thought it witty.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS Jr | March 7, 1995
Miami. -- So I read where babe du jour Pamela Anderson and Motley Crue rocker Tommy Lee just wed after a whole week of dating. There they are in People magazine -- lusty, busty and deeply smitten with the urgency of it all.I remember that feeling. Seems a long time ago. Marriage'll do that to you.Which is why I sometimes find myself looking over at the missus and wondering if we've still got it.I'm not even sure what ''it'' is, but we had plenty of it once upon a time, 17 years, five kids, two mortgages and a marriage license ago. ''It'' made us worry the clock and count the seconds till we could be together again.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A 62-year-old blind man has filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice claiming Baltimore paramedics refused to allow his service dog to accompany him in an ambulance after he was struck by a car. Curtis Graham Jr., a Marine who served in Vietnam, was on his way to the city's Veterans Day parade on Nov. 11 when he was hit by a car near his West Baltimore home. Paramedics would not allow Indo, his 2-year-old golden Labrador retriever, into the ambulance, Graham said. "They refused to take a service animal who I need very much," said Graham, who suffered minor injuries.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
Opening statements could come as early as Tuesday in the trial of two brothers accused of carrying out a murder-for-hire scheme orchestrated by Baltimore pastor Kevin Pushia, who pleaded guilty to ordering the death of a legally blind and mentally disabled man to fraudulently collect $1.4 million in life insurance. Brothers James Omar Clea III and Kareem Jamal Clea (pronounced "klee") are each charged with conspiring to kill Lemuel Wallace, a 37-year-old group-home resident who was shot in the head on Feb. 4, 2009, and left to die in a bathroom stall at Leakin Park.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | November 25, 2009
It's a miracle that "The Road" works at all, given the harsh, murmuring severity of its source, the 2006 Cormac McCarthy novel full of minimally punctuated dialogue, taking place in a world ravaged by an event - human-made? climatological? - unspecified by the author. Director John Hillcoat's film version, scripted by playwright Joe Penhall, constitutes an act of faithful adaptation. Yet its faithfulness is more to the letter than the spirit, and it's not the work of an inspired director, merely a dogged one. The script and the imagery take the story in some peculiar directions in the name of "relatability" and, odd as it sounds, sentimentality.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
Forty-three years after he was blinded by a childhood accident, Michael May had his sight restored by experimental stem cell surgery. His one good eye is optically almost perfect, and he can perceive color and objects in motion. But three years after his surgery, he still can't easily recognize faces or grasp much of the world he sees in its full three dimensions. Scientists writing in the journal Nature Neuroscience this week say May's case has given them new insights into how the brain processes visual signals and how early blindness can shut down portions of that processing work forever.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
HAGERSTOWN - In the blink of a neighborhood called Huyetts Crossroads, the man's house seems alive. A garden hose seems ready to water. A double-bowled cat dish appears ready to feed. The lawn looks recently mowed in customized lines. The Sunbeam thermometer - with a deer's likeness on the big dial - displays a temperature of 100 degrees. By the back door, a sticker says, "Active Supporter of Maryland Fraternal Order of Police." John Roy Ward lived on this dead-end street until June 30. On July 1, he was found dead on his kitchen floor with multiple wounds to his back and the back of his head.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
Looming city budget and job cuts dominated questions fielded last night by Mayor Martin O'Malley from an audience of about 300 at a community forum in Govans. Among the concerns was the city's proposed closing of six child care centers for school-age children. "I do not plan on having my son as a latchkey kid," said Sophia Hurt, a federal employee who said she leaves her 9-year-old son at a center at Waverly Elementary School before commuting to Washington. Several custodians in the Department of Recreation and Parks protested a city plan that might move their jobs to the private sector, but O'Malley assured them the city most likely would be able to find them other jobs.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | November 25, 2009
It's a miracle that "The Road" works at all, given the harsh, murmuring severity of its source, the 2006 Cormac McCarthy novel full of minimally punctuated dialogue, taking place in a world ravaged by an event - human-made? climatological? - unspecified by the author. Director John Hillcoat's film version, scripted by playwright Joe Penhall, constitutes an act of faithful adaptation. Yet its faithfulness is more to the letter than the spirit, and it's not the work of an inspired director, merely a dogged one. The script and the imagery take the story in some peculiar directions in the name of "relatability" and, odd as it sounds, sentimentality.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
Bill Ramsey, the blind vendor threatened with losing his concession business at the Baltimore County Detention Center, has won the fight to keep his job.Baltimore County was proposing to accept bids for running the commissary that Mr. Ramsey now operates in the jail to get part of the profit.But yesterday, County Executive Roger B. Hayden backed off, saying Mr. Ramsey would be allowed to continue to run the jail commissary as he's done since 1984."I feel good," said Mr. Ramsey, 52. "I really do. Of course, who wouldn't, when your job is saved?"
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
An international team of climbers completed the highest-ever rescue of victims from the dangerous north side of Mount Everest yesterday. The four stricken climbers --- an American and a Guatemalan from one expedition and two Russians from another team - were moved down to a lower altitude where they are being treated. The rescue mission began overnight Wednesday just below the 29,035-foot summit and played out on the ice and crumbling rocks as guides, Sherpas and clients formed a human chain to ferry supplies and fresh manpower to the effort.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 4, 1997
WHO KNEW, Mr. Magoo? Who knew, until this week, that you were a cartoon character of ridicule? Who knew that you were "an ill-tempered and incompetent blind man," rather than an eccentric, avuncular and nearsighted old guy with a knack for causing accidents without being injured in them?Once upon a time, we laughed.But, it turns out, not everyone thought Mr. Magoo was funny.Blind people, many of whom were kids when Mr. Magoo had his own television show, were glad to see him retire in the late 1960s.
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