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Blind Faith

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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 1, 2005
Westerns indigenous to England" is how Ridley Scott - the director of Alien, Thelma & Louise, and Black Hawk Down - described knight-in-shining-armor movies when he spoke of making one a quarter-century ago. Scott sprinkles showdowns aplenty throughout the medieval Jerusalem of his new film, Kingdom of Heaven, which opens Friday. Holy war beckons the Christian soldiers of the Crusades to expand their power base in the Holy Land and fight the Saracen warriors of Saladin, the unifier of the Muslim world.
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NEWS
November 12, 2012
For much of this election campaign, and during two previous two-term presidencies, I, like letter writer Alan Walden ("A stranger in his own land," Nov. 9), felt like a stranger in my own land. I have found myself asking, "Am I really this out of touch with what most Americans believe?" Faced with the apparent popularity of presidents and presidential aspirants espousing agendas rooted in fear, superstition, a rejection or ignorance of American history and science, and a blind faith in "business" as a cure-all for the nation's problems, I have felt dismayed.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 16, 1999
Courtney B. Vance and Charles S. Dutton deliver powerful performances in "Blind Faith," a courtroom melodrama in which these two fine, underused actors play brothers trying to navigate the racism, segregation and incipient integration of 1950s America. Their presence alone makes this heartbreaking story of striving and defeat worth seeing.Vance plays John Williams, a Bronx attorney who must represent his own nephew when the young man is accused of murdering a white boy. Dutton plays John's brother Charles, a police officer who is convinced that playing along with the white power structure will ensure the family's advancement.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 2, 2006
When Baltimore awakens to bold headlines screaming the worst about the Orioles' best and most popular players, as it did yesterday, the toll exacted by the franchise's nine straight losing seasons becomes especially clear.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
For much of this election campaign, and during two previous two-term presidencies, I, like letter writer Alan Walden ("A stranger in his own land," Nov. 9), felt like a stranger in my own land. I have found myself asking, "Am I really this out of touch with what most Americans believe?" Faced with the apparent popularity of presidents and presidential aspirants espousing agendas rooted in fear, superstition, a rejection or ignorance of American history and science, and a blind faith in "business" as a cure-all for the nation's problems, I have felt dismayed.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
Horse racing's theme is cycles of history, and another cycle was nearly completed yesterday at Laurel Park. After Eastover Faith devoured his opposition in the $75,000 Damascus Handicap, his trainer, King T. Leatherbury, said the colt's next race would probably be the Taking Risks Handicap on Sept. 5 at Timonium. Baird Brittingham, part owner of Eastover Faith, also owned Taking Risks. In 1994, the hard-knocking horse won the Grade I Iselin Handicap at Monmouth Park and several stakes in Maryland, including the Maryland Million Classic.
NEWS
February 12, 2005
IT'S A GOOD BET that many if not most of the obituaries for Arthur Miller will work in one of the playwright's most well-known and anguished lines: "Attention must be paid." That's Linda Loman saying it, wife of Willy and mother of Biff and Happy, and she is bringing to it a mixture of distress and outrage over the hand her husband has been dealt. She had faith in him, even if he didn't - and what about everyone else? Death of a Salesman is about a discarded life, and it is a particularly American story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harris and By Clarinda Harris,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
"Cherry, A Memoir," by Mary Karr. Viking. 276 pages. $24.95. A riff on Mary Karr's July 4 LSD celebration at age 16 (leading to arrest by villainous cops and rescue by her seductive mother) should be the high point of "Cherry, A Memoir." That it isn't (for me) results from the following: l. Descriptions of tripping have had more than 30 years -- 30 being the highest number a child of the '60s could trust -- to take on a depressing sameness. 2. Karr's description is expertly written. It gave me such a profound sense of impending car-sickness I could barely keep going.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 25, 1990
The docudrama "Good Night, Sweet Wife: A Murder in Boston" is bad "docu" but good drama.CBS' dramatized version of the murder of Carol Stuart -- who was shot dead while on her way home with her husband from a childbirth class last October -- is filled with questionable facts and intimate events the filmmakers could only speculate about.The film itself carries this disclaimer: "The following story is based upon actual events as reconstructed from news reports and interviews with participants.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
Comparing CarsEditor: I read with amusement the Feb. 11 article about John Jacobs receiving an ''apology'' from a Detroit assembly worker for a defect that caused brake failure in his two-month-old Buick LeSabre.I wonder if the General Motors assembler would have called had the brake defect caused an accident where Mr. Jacobs would have been killed.Sorry, I'll stick with my Toyota.Harry Kozlovsky.Baltimore.Basis of DisbeliefEditor: Why is that Sun editors consistently label those of us who do not believe the Warren Commission as paranoid?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 1, 2005
Westerns indigenous to England" is how Ridley Scott - the director of Alien, Thelma & Louise, and Black Hawk Down - described knight-in-shining-armor movies when he spoke of making one a quarter-century ago. Scott sprinkles showdowns aplenty throughout the medieval Jerusalem of his new film, Kingdom of Heaven, which opens Friday. Holy war beckons the Christian soldiers of the Crusades to expand their power base in the Holy Land and fight the Saracen warriors of Saladin, the unifier of the Muslim world.
NEWS
February 12, 2005
IT'S A GOOD BET that many if not most of the obituaries for Arthur Miller will work in one of the playwright's most well-known and anguished lines: "Attention must be paid." That's Linda Loman saying it, wife of Willy and mother of Biff and Happy, and she is bringing to it a mixture of distress and outrage over the hand her husband has been dealt. She had faith in him, even if he didn't - and what about everyone else? Death of a Salesman is about a discarded life, and it is a particularly American story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harris and By Clarinda Harris,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
"Cherry, A Memoir," by Mary Karr. Viking. 276 pages. $24.95. A riff on Mary Karr's July 4 LSD celebration at age 16 (leading to arrest by villainous cops and rescue by her seductive mother) should be the high point of "Cherry, A Memoir." That it isn't (for me) results from the following: l. Descriptions of tripping have had more than 30 years -- 30 being the highest number a child of the '60s could trust -- to take on a depressing sameness. 2. Karr's description is expertly written. It gave me such a profound sense of impending car-sickness I could barely keep going.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
Horse racing's theme is cycles of history, and another cycle was nearly completed yesterday at Laurel Park. After Eastover Faith devoured his opposition in the $75,000 Damascus Handicap, his trainer, King T. Leatherbury, said the colt's next race would probably be the Taking Risks Handicap on Sept. 5 at Timonium. Baird Brittingham, part owner of Eastover Faith, also owned Taking Risks. In 1994, the hard-knocking horse won the Grade I Iselin Handicap at Monmouth Park and several stakes in Maryland, including the Maryland Million Classic.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 16, 1999
Courtney B. Vance and Charles S. Dutton deliver powerful performances in "Blind Faith," a courtroom melodrama in which these two fine, underused actors play brothers trying to navigate the racism, segregation and incipient integration of 1950s America. Their presence alone makes this heartbreaking story of striving and defeat worth seeing.Vance plays John Williams, a Bronx attorney who must represent his own nephew when the young man is accused of murdering a white boy. Dutton plays John's brother Charles, a police officer who is convinced that playing along with the white power structure will ensure the family's advancement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Neil Strauss and Neil Strauss,New York Times | October 7, 1994
London -- Talking with Eric Clapton is like handling a sheathed sword. He seems gentle, calm and harmless. But occasionally his protective covering slips, revealing a man so raw and incisive that his words or simply his gaze can be as piercing as a blade.Mr. Clapton's guitar playing is similar: It sometimes seems as if he's plucking emotions instead of strings. This is one reason some consider him the greatest living guitarist; his fans in the 1960s called him God.It's also why he seldom grants interviews to the press.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 2, 2006
When Baltimore awakens to bold headlines screaming the worst about the Orioles' best and most popular players, as it did yesterday, the toll exacted by the franchise's nine straight losing seasons becomes especially clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Neil Strauss and Neil Strauss,New York Times | October 7, 1994
London -- Talking with Eric Clapton is like handling a sheathed sword. He seems gentle, calm and harmless. But occasionally his protective covering slips, revealing a man so raw and incisive that his words or simply his gaze can be as piercing as a blade.Mr. Clapton's guitar playing is similar: It sometimes seems as if he's plucking emotions instead of strings. This is one reason some consider him the greatest living guitarist; his fans in the 1960s called him God.It's also why he seldom grants interviews to the press.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
Comparing CarsEditor: I read with amusement the Feb. 11 article about John Jacobs receiving an ''apology'' from a Detroit assembly worker for a defect that caused brake failure in his two-month-old Buick LeSabre.I wonder if the General Motors assembler would have called had the brake defect caused an accident where Mr. Jacobs would have been killed.Sorry, I'll stick with my Toyota.Harry Kozlovsky.Baltimore.Basis of DisbeliefEditor: Why is that Sun editors consistently label those of us who do not believe the Warren Commission as paranoid?
NEWS
By STEPHEN HUNTER | February 12, 1992
Halfway through Oliver Stone's ''JFK,'' one of Jim Garrison's detectives, sitting in the fifth floor of the Texas Book Depository with a Mannlicher-Carcano 6.5 millimeter carbine, leans out the window, dry-fires once, awkwardly throws the bolt, fires again and then repeats the process for a third dry shot.''It can't be done,'' he says to Kevin Costner. ''No way he could fire three shots in 5.6 seconds.''In fact the belief that it is impossible to fire three shots from that rifle in 5.6 seconds, as the Warren commission maintained, is the very heart of conspiracy culture: It is the rock upon which the church is built.
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