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NEWS
May 30, 2014
In response to Michael Dresser 's May 28th article that describes Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign treasury as having over $4 million cash on hand ( "Brown raises $1.2 million in 6 weeks," May 28), it is worth pointing out that some of this money goes to the campaign signs that end up on vacant houses and blighted structures throughout the city. In my district, major culprits include the Brown/Ulman ticket, Doc Cheatham, and the ubiquitous Conaways. But no ticket appears on more vacant buildings than the signs encouraging the re-election of Joan Carter Conway, Maggie McIntosh, Curt Anderson and Mary Washington.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
A development group wants to build nearly 200 townhouses on the site of the former Seagram's distillery in Dundalk - a blighted collection of abandoned buildings where two people have died while trespassing and exploring. The Sollers Point Road property, which hasn't been used as a whiskey distillery since the early 1990s, has been the scene of problems in recent years. Fires have broken out, and county officials have received complaints about graffiti, weeds, broken fences and other issues.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Did I hear about a new boxwood disease? I want to plant boxwood this year, because deer don't eat it. What do you think? Boxwood boasts glossy evergreen leaves, a sedate growth habit that doesn't demand constant pruning, and deer actually leave it alone. But, yes, boxwood blight was found last year in Virginia, North Carolina, Massachusetts, and in one nursery in Maryland. We don't know how it got here from Europe, where it has devastated boxwood, but it's a good reminder why travelers should not bring home even a dry sprig of plant material.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
In response to Michael Dresser 's May 28th article that describes Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign treasury as having over $4 million cash on hand ( "Brown raises $1.2 million in 6 weeks," May 28), it is worth pointing out that some of this money goes to the campaign signs that end up on vacant houses and blighted structures throughout the city. In my district, major culprits include the Brown/Ulman ticket, Doc Cheatham, and the ubiquitous Conaways. But no ticket appears on more vacant buildings than the signs encouraging the re-election of Joan Carter Conway, Maggie McIntosh, Curt Anderson and Mary Washington.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
I take exception to those who feel demolishing blight won't create new and better housing opportunities ("Market forces alone can't produce more affordable housing in Baltimore," Dec. 30). In 1980, the city demolished several acres of land in Upper Fells Point's Washington Hill neighborhood to attract development and moderate-income people to the area. The land was attached to a federal UDAG (Urban Development Action Grant) and a city block grant. Through the vision of Jay Brodie, director of the Baltimore Development Corporation, Betty Hyatt, a Washington Hill community activist, the Union Trust Bank and others, I and my partner Tom Henderson developed a community of 109 new homes surrounding a one-acre community park.
NEWS
May 3, 2012
The Sun credits Ray Lewis' influence in bringing a nonprofit group into Baltimore to solve a neighborhood blight problem ("A prescription for the east side," April 28). The irony is that Mr. Lewis is vice chairman of a nonprofit group with a goal of improving communities, yet he has an abysmal record of personal business successes. Dennis R. McCartney, Dundalk
NEWS
January 9, 2006
On January 6, 2006, REV. LEONARD M. BLIGHT, JR.; beloved husband of Shelva J. Blight (nee Elick); devoted father of Deborah Wright and her husband Howard, Sharon L. Blight-Claus and her husband Joshua; loving grandfather of David E., Katie L., Heather L., Brittany J. Wright and Victoria H. D. Blight. Also survived by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Friends may call at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck Inc., Funeral Home, 5305 Harford Road, (at Echodale), on Sunday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Rev. Blight will lie in-state at Calvary Tabernacle Church, 6008 Old Harford Road, on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. and Tuesday from 10 to 11 A.M., the funeral hour.
NEWS
By Edward T. McMahon | February 27, 2003
IT'S A mystery why the Baltimore City Council would want to turn the 1st Mariner Arena into a canvas for giant outdoor advertisements. Baltimore already has too many billboards. Putting up even more defies everything the city has been trying to achieve. Here are seven reasons why Baltimore should say no to more billboards: A city's image is fundamentally important to its economic well-being. People routinely decide where to live, where to invest and where to vacation based on what a city looks like.
NEWS
By Bishop Douglas Miles and The Rev. Marshall Prentice | July 11, 2005
BALTIMORE IS NOT alone in its severity of blighted neighborhoods. Despite the revitalization of its downtown, Philadelphia has one of the highest rates of abandonment in the country - over 30,000 vacant houses and lots. Philadelphia Interfaith Action responded to this crisis in 2001 by calling for the largest effort ever to rebuild a declining American city. It worked with Mayor John Street and the City Council to develop a $295 million bond issue to fund the nation's first, large-scale blight removal and predevelopment program.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2006
The Rev. Leonard Milson Blight, who had been pastor of Calvary Tabernacle in Hamilton for more than three decades, died of cancer Friday at his Parkville home. He was 72. Mr. Blight, the son of a minister, was born in Baltimore and raised on Gay Street. He was a 1953 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in pastoral studies in 1956 from Nyack Missionary College in Nyack, N.Y. "His father was a minister, and his decision to go into the ministry was a calling from God," said his wife of 48 years, the former Shelva Jean Elick.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | February 11, 2014
Baltimore still has a lot of work to do, but our city has much more for which to be grateful. The State of the City address is an opportunity to update citizens on what government is doing to confront our most immediate challenges, but also to take stock of our progress in tackling systemic problems that have been around for decades. There is no more immediate challenge in Baltimore than our fight against violent crime. While progress has been made in reducing assaults, robberies, rapes and overall violent crime, our homicide rate remains far too high.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
A California city's controversial plan to use eminent domain to help its residents burdened with mortgages worth more than their homes has caught the eye of some Baltimore leaders, who say the city might benefit from the program. There are thousands of such underwater mortgages in Baltimore, so 4th District Councilman Bill Henry has asked the City Council to explore the possibility of using the city's power to take mortgages from banks and then work with a private firm to refinance the loans based on current property value.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Rozeana Faulk has lived her whole life in Baltimore's Oliver neighborhood, watching as drug trafficking gripped what was once a solid middle-class community and the area decayed. Now Faulk sees signs of hope in one of the city's most depressed and crime-ridden neighborhoods. Some rowhouses on her block, the 1400 block of N. Bond St., have been vacant for 20 years, but now they're being rehabbed and new families are moving in. Fewer drug dealers hang out on the corners, she said. People are starting to make more of an effort to help their neighbors.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
Who is this wacko Tom Schaller, and why does he harbor so much hostility toward the people of Western Maryland ( "Don't secede; vote with your feet," Oct. 29)? The fact is that the interests of Maryland's western counties are not well represented by their state government. So why shouldn't they make some noise? Mr. Schaller labels these people as "Maryland haters. " After looking up his all-too-short biography on the Internet, it turns out that Mr. Schaller himself is not a native of Maryland but rather of New York and he has lived all over.
NEWS
By Matthew D. Gallagher | October 6, 2013
Baltimore is on the cusp of making once unimaginable progress in modernizing its obsolete public school facilities with more than $1 billion in investment over the next 10 years. Broad coalitions of supporters, feasible financing plans and the adoption of needed accountability systems, along with the alignment of civic and elected leadership sustained through the legislative process, helped achieve this potentially game-changing outcome. Such a hard-won victory illustrates what is possible and should galvanize our community to act on another of the city's biggest challenges: Baltimore's 16,000 vacant properties.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
Once more our fine liberal politicians (city or state, as both are the same mutated species) have reached beyond the bounds of common sense and constitutional intent to fetter the perceived "money holders. " Let's go after those who have legitimately earned a dollar and squeeze out our percentage. Simple corruption. I have to laugh at the logic in Baltimore's billboard tax ("Clear Channel sues Baltimore, calls new billboard tax 'unconstitutional,'" Aug. 16): The billboard tax law states that "the Council has determined that outdoor advertising endangers public safety by distracting the attention of drivers from the roadway and may otherwise endanger the public health, safety, and welfare.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
About 800 people, some from as far as New York, filled Zion Baptist Church in Oliver yesterday to take part in a rally urging federal government officials to do more to redevelop the East Baltimore neighborhood and others like it along the East Coast. The rally was sponsored by the Industrial Areas Foundation-East, made up of 12 citizens groups from Boston to Washington, including BUILD, Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development. "We've come from far away to shed a public light on a problem in our cities," said the Rev. Darrell Macklin, pastor of St. Paul Baptist Church in Washington and co-chairman of the event.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
In the heart of East Baltimore, leaders of an ambitious and highly praised effort to transform some of the city's most deteriorated neighborhoods have been losing the battle against blight. On block after block in the area around the Johns Hopkins medical campus, houses are being abandoned far more quickly than they are being acquired and rehabilitated. Five years after the Historic East Baltimore Community Action Coalition drew up its renewal plan - and four years after $34.1 million in federal money was secured to fund it - only 47 rowhouses have been rehabilitated or are in the process of being renovated, less than 10 percent of what had been promised.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
Six Baltimore community groups filed an $8 million lawsuit Tuesday against a Texas man whose companies own dozens of properties in the city, alleging that he failed to improve rundown homes after purchasing them at tax sales and allowed them to become a danger. "The lawsuit challenges the practice of purchasing vacant properties at tax sale and leaving them for dead with unaddressed city code violations," said Kristine Dunkerton, executive director of the Community Law Center Inc., a nonprofit based in Baltimore that represents the community associations.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
People with old boxwoods are being warned not to plant new boxwoods nearby, but what about those of us with no boxwoods who want some? They're so deer-resistant. The new and highly contagious boxwood blight disease has made it unwise, for the present, to introduce new, possibly infected plants into a landscape with old boxwood, especially historic boxwood. In your case, buying locally or Southern--grown boxwood would be the safest bet. Keep in mind that boxwood blight can infect both native and Japanese pachysandra as well as sweetbox (Sarcococca)
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