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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 17, 2007
It's been more than 30 years since Blaze Starr, the legendary ecdysiast and Queen of Burlesque, last danced across the runway of her Two O'Clock Club on The Block in Baltimore while blowing rose petals to admiring audiences. "I still dream about it. It was a comedy show and I had lots of fun, but everything has its season," Starr said the other day. Since retiring in the early 1980s after hanging up her G-string and pasties, Starr embarked on a second career as a successful self-taught jewelry designer and maker.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Separate stabbing incidents in Baltimore and in Baltimore County overnight left one man dead and four people injured, police in both jurisdictions said Sunday. In the Baltimore confrontation, city police said, 19-year-old Jesse Clark-Nugent died early Sunday after he was stabbed multiple times inside the Two O'Clock Club in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St. Two others were injured in the strip club along The Block. A 30-year-old man stabbed in the neck and a 17-year-old boy stabbed in the torso are expected to survive, police said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Once the Queen of Baltimore burlesque, Fannie Belle Fleming — better known as Blaze Starr — has been living the quiet life in rural West Virginia for more than 30 years now, far away from the blinking neon signs, barkers and strippers of The Block. The Block was her venue, where she reigned supreme for more than 20 years. She is still fondly remembered by generations of gents, sans wife or girlfriend, traveling salesmen and servicemen all out for a night on the town, and for the rose petals that she gently blew across her ample bosom to admiring audiences from the runway of her Two O'Clock Club.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
William Stump, a veteran Baltimore editor and journalist, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The former Cockeysville resident was 90. Recalled for his open mind and the help he gave aspiring writers, Mr. Stump was a past editor of Baltimore Magazine, which he led from a Chamber of Commerce publication to an urban monthly. He was also the old News American's last editorial page editor. Born in Orange, N.J., and raised in Emmorton in Harford County, he was the son of Dr. William Stump, a ship's physician, and Constance Poor, whose father was a founder of the Standard & Poor's financial ratings.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | December 10, 1994
Anthony J. Ambridge said The Block has deteriorated since the 2nd District councilman sneaked down to one of its lurid nightclubs as 15-year-old to see a performance by the legendary stripper Blaze Starr.Mr. Ambridge and the rest of the City Council voted Thursday to approve a bill to regulate The Block. After six years of negotiations between city officials and owners of businesses in the adult entertainment district, both sides agree that the new rules will permit its survival."The good businessmen will survive; the bad will not," said Mr. Ambridge, chairman of the City Council's land use committee.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | May 11, 2007
John Waters can't remember the last time he was in Columbia. "I think one time I picked up a rug there," he says on the phone from Los Angeles. But he knows that the stripper Blaze Starr spent time there, so he's excited to host a fundraising dinner tonight for the Columbia Festival of the Arts. "Any neighborhood where Blaze Starr once sold her jewelry at a cart in the mall is good enough for me," says the king of trash film. The event, which is being held at 6:30 p.m. at the Spear Center, is being promoted as "An Evening with John Waters."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
The death two weeks ago of B film director Doris Wishman in Coral Gables, Fla., brought the name of Baltimore's premier ecdysiast, Fannie Belle Fleming, better known as Blaze Starr, back into the news. Wishman, called "the greatest female exploitation director in history" by drive-in movie critic Joe Bob Briggs, in 1962 made Blaze Starr Goes Nudist, in which Starr plays herself - what else? - during a romp at a nudist colony. It was her only movie. Until hanging up her G-string and pasties in 1984, Starr was known as the Queen of Burlesque and the nation's premier exotic dancer, honors she proudly held for decades.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 21, 1991
When an automobile accident killed Barry Holniker at the age of 34 in 1990 he had already been a professional photographer for 12 years and was enjoying a successful career.Just how successful can be seen in "Barry Holniker (1955-1990): A Retrospective" at the BAUhouse. Beginning with assignments for the City Paper in 1978 while he was still at the Maryland Institute, College of Art (he graduated in 1980), he was soon doing brochures for such clients as Wesleyan University, Mercantile Bank, and Blue Cross and Blue Shield.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Separate stabbing incidents in Baltimore and in Baltimore County overnight left one man dead and four people injured, police in both jurisdictions said Sunday. In the Baltimore confrontation, city police said, 19-year-old Jesse Clark-Nugent died early Sunday after he was stabbed multiple times inside the Two O'Clock Club in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St. Two others were injured in the strip club along The Block. A 30-year-old man stabbed in the neck and a 17-year-old boy stabbed in the torso are expected to survive, police said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Some would call it a miracle: Ministers, churchgoers, and the owners of the notorious adult businesses on The Block banded together yesterday to denounce a City Council bill that would kill Baltimore's red light district.Among the crowd of about 100 people who attended the planning commission's public hearing were peep-show and nightclub owners looking to protect their investments and religious folks looking to protect their neighborhoods."We have become strange bedfellows when I must be supportive of The Block business owners' efforts to keep their businesses ++ where they are," said the Rev. Harold Kidd of the Cherry Hill Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2010
One of the most rewarding pleasures of this job is interacting with readers who contact me with colorful comments or additional insights and observations about someone or something I've written about. Sometimes they also write letters and e-mails or call on the phone to correct me, and I'm most grateful for informed and correct criticism. The death last month of noted Baltimore artist Ann Didusch Schuler, who co-founded the Schuler School of Fine Arts with her husband, Hans C. Schuler, brought calls and e-mails from several former students who are now professional artists or teachers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Once the Queen of Baltimore burlesque, Fannie Belle Fleming — better known as Blaze Starr — has been living the quiet life in rural West Virginia for more than 30 years now, far away from the blinking neon signs, barkers and strippers of The Block. The Block was her venue, where she reigned supreme for more than 20 years. She is still fondly remembered by generations of gents, sans wife or girlfriend, traveling salesmen and servicemen all out for a night on the town, and for the rose petals that she gently blew across her ample bosom to admiring audiences from the runway of her Two O'Clock Club.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella | April 21, 2010
Sorry to break it to you, Baltimore. But you may have seen the last of Larry Flynt 's stripper-mobile. The converted U-Haul truck advertising Flynt's Hustler Club is outfitted with a Plexiglas box, sort of like the Popemobile. But this vehicle is outfitted with a stripper's pole and a bunch of itsy-bitsy-bikini-clad dancers doing – what else? – pole dancing. It was last seen rolling around Camden Yards as a game was letting out, treating fans to more action than the Orioles seem capable of providing.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | May 11, 2007
John Waters can't remember the last time he was in Columbia. "I think one time I picked up a rug there," he says on the phone from Los Angeles. But he knows that the stripper Blaze Starr spent time there, so he's excited to host a fundraising dinner tonight for the Columbia Festival of the Arts. "Any neighborhood where Blaze Starr once sold her jewelry at a cart in the mall is good enough for me," says the king of trash film. The event, which is being held at 6:30 p.m. at the Spear Center, is being promoted as "An Evening with John Waters."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 17, 2007
It's been more than 30 years since Blaze Starr, the legendary ecdysiast and Queen of Burlesque, last danced across the runway of her Two O'Clock Club on The Block in Baltimore while blowing rose petals to admiring audiences. "I still dream about it. It was a comedy show and I had lots of fun, but everything has its season," Starr said the other day. Since retiring in the early 1980s after hanging up her G-string and pasties, Starr embarked on a second career as a successful self-taught jewelry designer and maker.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
The death two weeks ago of B film director Doris Wishman in Coral Gables, Fla., brought the name of Baltimore's premier ecdysiast, Fannie Belle Fleming, better known as Blaze Starr, back into the news. Wishman, called "the greatest female exploitation director in history" by drive-in movie critic Joe Bob Briggs, in 1962 made Blaze Starr Goes Nudist, in which Starr plays herself - what else? - during a romp at a nudist colony. It was her only movie. Until hanging up her G-string and pasties in 1984, Starr was known as the Queen of Burlesque and the nation's premier exotic dancer, honors she proudly held for decades.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | January 16, 1994
The world-famous Block woke up yesterday with a monumental hangover from the massive police invasion of Friday night, and was left wondering whether it had a future.Said a man in a brown bomber jacket who parks cars at a lot just off Baltimore Street, and who declined to give his name: "The Block has changed. It used to be nice down here long time ago. No problems. Everybody go in the bars and have a nice time. Now we get a lot of muggings. It gets worse every year. Too much stuff going down."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1995
George Bush peers pleasantly presidential from painter Joe Sheppard's new portrait.From hers, Barbara Mikulski beams sincerely senatorial.In his portrait, John Waters appears cinematically saturnine.Leaning against a wall in Mr. Sheppard's studio over Rita St. Clair's Findings Gallery, President Bush's portrait is packed and ready for shipment to Houston where it's destined to hang in the $86 million George Bush Presidential Library Center, now abuilding.So far, Mr. Bush has seen only photographs of the finished portrait.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 2000
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Brows are wrinkling, lips are pursing. Everyone in courtroom 201 seems in high snit: The jury thinks a defendant's wife has been making faces at witnesses. The judge thinks the lawyers are ignoring his rulings. The U.S. marshals think several spectators need a good jab of the baton for whispering among themselves. In the center of this petulant bunch -- in fact, the whole reason they are here at all -- is a 72-year-old man as placid as all around him are agitated. His pinkish face is baby-bottom smooth, his white hair cascades from a sweatless brow and his expression tells you as much as that of a veteran poker player holding a straight flush.
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