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November 27, 2005
On Friday, November 25, 2005, BERNARD M. BLASS; loving husband of Barbara S. Blass (nee Jacobson); beloved father of David Blass of Bethesda, MD and Carol Oppenheim of Baltimore, MD and the late Joel R. Blass; devoted father-in-law of Karen Blass and Carl Oppenheim; beloved brother of Betty Bormel of Baltimore, MD and Irvin Blass of Silver Spring, MD; loving grandfather of Sarah and Ryan Felber and Amy Oppenheim; devoted great grandfather of Noal Felber....
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NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | April 20, 2008
AT MANY FUNDRAISING PARTIES, YOU could say it's almost de rigueur to arrive at least 15 minutes after the doors open. The LifeBridge Health Magic of Life Gala was not one of them. At 6 p.m. -- the official start time of the gala -- at least 200 guests were already milling around the mezzanine. And that was only the beginning. "Another 1,300 to go," gala chair Lynn Abeshouse said, watching folks filing in. "But we're totally prepared." As the steady stream of people in formal dress continued into the theater, a well-trained army of food servers met them.
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FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | December 4, 1997
Children's holiday dreams of napping with Sing and Snore Ernie may be a lot more realistic than women's fantasies of a chance to dress up in full gala regalia. The seasonal accumulation of magazines and catalogs is chock-a-block with beaded gowns, velvet opera coats, miles of diamante necklaces and outrageously unpractical dancing shoes. Women look, they dream, but the scenario that would merit all this finery eludes them.Dressed-down parties have become so entrenched on the social scene during the last decade that women have nearly lost the knack of going full-tilt for glamour.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
On Friday, November 25, 2005, BERNARD M. BLASS; loving husband of Barbara S. Blass (nee Jacobson); beloved father of David Blass of Bethesda, MD and Carol Oppenheim of Baltimore, MD and the late Joel R. Blass; devoted father-in-law of Karen Blass and Carl Oppenheim; beloved brother of Betty Bormel of Baltimore, MD and Irvin Blass of Silver Spring, MD; loving grandfather of Sarah and Ryan Felber and Amy Oppenheim; devoted great grandfather of Noal Felber....
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2002
In the often gaudy, extreme and super-stylized world of fashion, Bill Blass was a subtle American revolutionary who pioneered designing casualwear that was sophisticated and eveningwear that was comfortable. And in a career that spanned more than 40 years, he gathered respect, awards galore and many admirers along the way. When Blass died this week of cancer in his Washington, Conn., home at age 79, his fans, friends and fashion peers remembered him as the gregarious, debonair intellectual who could be gruff, but charming, and possessed the vision and talent to put American fashion on the map. Carmen Marc Valvo, women's eveningwear designer What Bill will be remembered for was his truly American sense of style and his way of showing grandeur through understatement.
FEATURES
By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,Knight-Ridder | April 10, 1991
NEW YORK Bill Blass opened the fall ready-to- wear collections here with a virtual plaid brigade for day and night.For day, there were green-and-red-plaid silk dresses, jackets and skirts similar to uniforms worn by Catholic-school girls, as well as black-and-white-gingham suits and walking shorts.For night, iridescent plaid bodices, also black and white, met short velvet or sheer net tulle skirts.Blass was joined in his plaid madness by Carolina Herrera, who tossed in checks and houndstooth patterns for good measure.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
BILL BLASSHe was there, doing that uptown style to perfection, when Anna Wintour was still in knee socks. Ladies who can never be too rich or too thin continue to flock to his shows because a Blass design beautifully covers untuckable trouble spots.Blass doesn't make waves or launch trends; he just continues to make beautiful clothes.This spring, as other designers flirt with Sixties influences, Blass polishes his repertory of the American classics he invented. hTC Double-faced wool coats over matching dresses are seam stitched to enhance the shape.
FEATURES
By Trish Donnally and Trish Donnally,San Francisco Chronicle | April 8, 1992
It's a long story.First, a fashion flashback to last month. At that time, Bill Blass said, "Very long only looks good on young, skinny kids. Otherwise, it's aging."On Monday, as a week's worth of fall fashion shows began on Seventh Avenue in New York, Mr. Blass showed more long than short skirts. "I'm getting sick of the miniskirt, so sick of the short skirt," he said.In fairness to Mr. Blass, his long skirts hit only an inch or two below the knees, but they were skinny and most often knit.
FEATURES
By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,N.Y. Times News Service | November 6, 1991
NEW YORK - Spring arrived on Seventh Avenue this week in a flurry of pretty colors, cheerful prints and gentle shapes.Bill Blass, as usual, staged the first big show of the season at the Hotel Pierre, attended by socialites as well as retailers and the press.Carolina Herrera flanked the Blass noontime show with smaller presentations before and after in her showroom. In the afternoon Arnold Scaasi was among the first to show at the Hotel Macklowe, where other designers will be introducing their collections later in the week.
FEATURES
By New York Times | December 13, 1990
This is the saga of a country-cousin staple that came to town in a big way. This season soft tweeds, with their subtle or strong mixes of colors and patterns, have become the chic city fabric. Just a look around a packed luncheon at the packed Waldorf-Astoria ballroom in New York last week proved the tweed takeover.It seemed that every other woman was wearing a colorful tweed suit or jacket. Meanwhile, women are looking stylish in restaurants and at private dinner parties wearing short dinner dresses, often strapless, but unexpectedly made from the boldest of patterned tweeds.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2002
In the often gaudy, extreme and super-stylized world of fashion, Bill Blass was a subtle American revolutionary who pioneered designing casualwear that was sophisticated and eveningwear that was comfortable. And in a career that spanned more than 40 years, he gathered respect, awards galore and many admirers along the way. When Blass died this week of cancer in his Washington, Conn., home at age 79, his fans, friends and fashion peers remembered him as the gregarious, debonair intellectual who could be gruff, but charming, and possessed the vision and talent to put American fashion on the map. Carmen Marc Valvo, women's eveningwear designer What Bill will be remembered for was his truly American sense of style and his way of showing grandeur through understatement.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2002
Bill Blass, the American designer who built a multimillion-dollar business on understated clothes and a keen perception of the taste of upper-income American woman, died last night at his home in New Preston, Conn. He was 79. The cause was cancer, said his friend Helen O'Hagan. Mr. Blass was the first to say he was the kind of designer who was rediscovered every few years, but although his star burned more brightly in some seasons than in others, he remained in the forefront of fashion for more than three decades.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
Bill Blass, one of the first American designers to start his own label, recently launched his latest perfume, Amazing. Blass, 77, suffered a mild heart attack recently and announced that after 50 years in fashion, he will retire next year. Here he talks about his work and life.Q. Why retire?A. I really feel that after 50-odd years -- and believe me, odd -- 50 years of working that I want to do a book, and I want to do other things. I really want to spend some time in the country. And, God, I'm entitled.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | December 4, 1997
Children's holiday dreams of napping with Sing and Snore Ernie may be a lot more realistic than women's fantasies of a chance to dress up in full gala regalia. The seasonal accumulation of magazines and catalogs is chock-a-block with beaded gowns, velvet opera coats, miles of diamante necklaces and outrageously unpractical dancing shoes. Women look, they dream, but the scenario that would merit all this finery eludes them.Dressed-down parties have become so entrenched on the social scene during the last decade that women have nearly lost the knack of going full-tilt for glamour.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
BILL BLASSHe was there, doing that uptown style to perfection, when Anna Wintour was still in knee socks. Ladies who can never be too rich or too thin continue to flock to his shows because a Blass design beautifully covers untuckable trouble spots.Blass doesn't make waves or launch trends; he just continues to make beautiful clothes.This spring, as other designers flirt with Sixties influences, Blass polishes his repertory of the American classics he invented. hTC Double-faced wool coats over matching dresses are seam stitched to enhance the shape.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 2, 1995
Q: I want to buy myself a new outfit for spring. And when I say outfit, I mean it. I travel a lot and I want to use it for the basis of the three- and four-day business trips I take regularly.I'm interested in a coat and suit or a coat and dress -- something that has a modern approach to dressing.A: Bill Blass put together an unusual spring outfit in black and white gingham that may give you some ideas. It's a coat, a long vest and a black patent skirt."I like the range of possibilities it gives a woman," he says.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | April 20, 2008
AT MANY FUNDRAISING PARTIES, YOU could say it's almost de rigueur to arrive at least 15 minutes after the doors open. The LifeBridge Health Magic of Life Gala was not one of them. At 6 p.m. -- the official start time of the gala -- at least 200 guests were already milling around the mezzanine. And that was only the beginning. "Another 1,300 to go," gala chair Lynn Abeshouse said, watching folks filing in. "But we're totally prepared." As the steady stream of people in formal dress continued into the theater, a well-trained army of food servers met them.
FEATURES
By Edited by Catherine Cook | September 19, 1991
Knock it offIs it a case of simultaneous inspiration or is it a pure and simple knockoff of another designer's great idea? In fashion it's often difficult to distinguish. October's Glamour magazine shows five party dresses that look awfully similar to a pearl-strapped, back-bowed trapeze dress that Bill Blass showed in his last spring collection.Rather than cry foul about copycats, Blass spokesman Tom Fallon told Glamour, "the only clever way to deal with it is to beat the competition -- knock yourself off in your own lower-priced line, which is what Bill did. He said, 'This is the kind of dress that's gonna get copied.
FEATURES
By Etta Froio and Etta Froio,Fairchild Publications | January 27, 1994
Bill Blass and Oscar de la Renta, the ambassadors of American fashion, are always ready to charm.Since Mr. de la Renta, now 61, showed his first collection in 1965 for Jane Derby, and Mr. Blass brought his boyhood visions of 1930s glamour from Fort Wayne, Ind., to New York 50 years ago, they both have slowly and methodically built their careers by dressing the affluent.The formula has paid off handsomely for the two designers.Mr. Blass, 71, has 50 worldwide licensees which reportedly generate retail sales in excess of $700,000,000.
FEATURES
By Trish Donnally and Trish Donnally,San Francisco Chronicle | April 8, 1992
It's a long story.First, a fashion flashback to last month. At that time, Bill Blass said, "Very long only looks good on young, skinny kids. Otherwise, it's aging."On Monday, as a week's worth of fall fashion shows began on Seventh Avenue in New York, Mr. Blass showed more long than short skirts. "I'm getting sick of the miniskirt, so sick of the short skirt," he said.In fairness to Mr. Blass, his long skirts hit only an inch or two below the knees, but they were skinny and most often knit.
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