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NEWS
June 13, 2013
Reader David Liddle writes that "since I have nothing to hide and would like to protect myself and my family from terrorists, I have no problem with the government looking at my emails and listening to my phone calls" ("'Don't worry: The NSA isn't interested in you," June 12). I would ask if he sees any value in the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution guaranteeing privacy from government intrusion? Would he prefer to live under a totalitarian government that spies on all its citizens in order to silence dissent?
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
The signing of a long-delayed bilateral security agreement between the U.S. and Afghanistan today means the U.S. won't again find itself in the same situation it faced two years ago in Iraq, where the failure to reach a similar accord precipitated the withdrawal of all American forces and a rapid deterioration of the security situation. The Afghans can now be assured of continued American military assistance in their struggle against a resurgent Taliban - at least for the next two years, when the agreement must be renewed.
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NEWS
December 13, 2012
The U.S. Senate hasn't passed a budget in four years, during which time our budget deficits have averaged $1.1 trillion a year. The national debt is $16 trillion and rising, and it is now more than 70 percent of GDP. Meanwhile, unfunded mandates for Social Security and Medicare exceed tens of trillions of dollars. Yet according to The Sun, Republicans are the ones who are being irresponsible by attempting to use the debt ceiling to restore fiscal sanity to the nation's budget chaos ("The GOP's cynical debt limit ploy," Dec. 10)
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Reader David Liddle writes that "since I have nothing to hide and would like to protect myself and my family from terrorists, I have no problem with the government looking at my emails and listening to my phone calls" ("'Don't worry: The NSA isn't interested in you," June 12). I would ask if he sees any value in the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution guaranteeing privacy from government intrusion? Would he prefer to live under a totalitarian government that spies on all its citizens in order to silence dissent?
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | October 26, 2006
Media pundits have just about given this year's election to the Democrats - at least in the House of Representatives and perhaps in the Senate as well. They might even be right, for a change. Some are saying that this could be like the 1994 midterm election shocker, when the Republicans seized control of the House of Representatives for the first time in 40 years. If so, the Democrats will win by following the exact opposite strategy from that which brought the congressional Republicans to power in 1994.
NEWS
By DEAN BAKER | October 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Ben Bernanke, President Bush's choice to be the new chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, is a highly respected economist who is well qualified to hold the position. But the change of leadership, after Alan Greenspan's long tenure, provides a good opportunity to re-examine how the Fed works. Specifically, Congress should use this changing of the guard to modernize the way the Fed is financed. The Fed's finances are an obscure mystery known to only a tiny group of policy wonks.
NEWS
By Jeff Blum | April 9, 2012
When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, many strategists suggested that the Cold War arms race had bankrupted its economy and caused its downfall. More than 20 years later, it appears that some in Washington are driving the U.S. toward a similar fate. Most recently, House Republicans (led by Rep. Paul Ryan) introduced a budget that both lavishly funds the Pentagon and slashes domestic programs. Mr. Ryan has even questioned whether generals were being honest in their assessment of the president's budget, suggesting, "We don't think the generals are giving us their true advice.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 18, 2005
Hey you. Got $1,000 or so? Tired of mutual funds, bank deposits and plain old stocks and bonds? Want to mimic the big money, go where few ordinary investors have gone? Ferris, Baker Watts might have a deal for you. The Baltimore financial house is managing three prospective stock offerings that are described as giving small investors entry into the rarified and red-hot world of "private equity" corporate buyouts. It's "an opportunity for a retail investor to play private equity with less of a risk" than normal private pools, says Richard Prins, senior vice president at Ferris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 11, 1994
"Blank Check"Starring Brian Bonsall and Karen DuffyDirected by Rupert WainwrightReleased by DisneyPG-rated*p,11p "Blank Check" appears to have been made from a script full of blank pages. It's dim, negligible, incredulous, a thorough piece of fluff.This week's Macauley Culkin wannabe, Brian Bonsall, plays a powerless youngest son in a prosperous Midwestern household -- Dad is some sort of investment counselor -- who is consistently picked on not merely by two older brothers but by the world in general.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
The best TV tonight looks to be on HBO; if you're not hooked up, check out the disappointing, though occasionally enjoyable, "Relativity" on ABC while you still can."The Lou Rawls Parade of Stars" (6 p.m.-1 a.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- David Hasselhoff, the Isley Brothers, Peabo Bryson, Jody Watley, Sheryl Lee Ralph and the Mighty Clouds of Joy are among the celebrities helping Lou Rawls raise money for the United Negro College Fund."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13 -- That darn Sully goes and gets himself thrown in jail, all in the name of saving lives and trying to stop a dam from being built.
NEWS
December 13, 2012
The U.S. Senate hasn't passed a budget in four years, during which time our budget deficits have averaged $1.1 trillion a year. The national debt is $16 trillion and rising, and it is now more than 70 percent of GDP. Meanwhile, unfunded mandates for Social Security and Medicare exceed tens of trillions of dollars. Yet according to The Sun, Republicans are the ones who are being irresponsible by attempting to use the debt ceiling to restore fiscal sanity to the nation's budget chaos ("The GOP's cynical debt limit ploy," Dec. 10)
NEWS
By Jeff Blum | April 9, 2012
When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, many strategists suggested that the Cold War arms race had bankrupted its economy and caused its downfall. More than 20 years later, it appears that some in Washington are driving the U.S. toward a similar fate. Most recently, House Republicans (led by Rep. Paul Ryan) introduced a budget that both lavishly funds the Pentagon and slashes domestic programs. Mr. Ryan has even questioned whether generals were being honest in their assessment of the president's budget, suggesting, "We don't think the generals are giving us their true advice.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
As the president and the speaker of the House intensified their debate over raising the nation's $14.3 trillion debt ceiling Monday night, the real world impact was reflected among Maryland federal workers like Jacqueline Hamilton. After 44 years of working for the Social Security Administration, Hamilton is understandably concerned about cuts that may be coming to the federal work force. But she's also worried about senior citizens and the disabled who rely on Social Security to make ends meet.
NEWS
March 16, 2011
When Gov. Martin O'Malley proposed an emergency plan to subsidize Maryland's thoroughbred tracks this year, we supported it. Without subsidies, the number of racing days would have been slashed, and even the running of the Preakness was at legitimate risk. For better or worse, the slots bill Maryland's legislature and voters approved included subsidies for horse racing, and if the form those subsidies took — an increase in racing purses and bred funds — wasn't the right way to keep the tracks running, diverting them to direct operating support made sense.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
The Bush administration is pushing for swift approval of its unprecedented bailout of America's financial industry. As details of the proposal emerged over the weekend, Democratic and Republican members of Congress raised concerns about the extent of the taxpayers' potential liability - up to $700 billion - and the need to build in some accountability. They are right to be concerned, because the bailout will likely be managed for the most part by whoever wins the November election. And no one knows who will lead the key departments that will be overseeing the restructuring.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | July 11, 2008
I like Orioles manager Dave Trembley, and I'm hoping that he lives a long and happy life, which means keeping his blood pressure down, controlling his temper, not overreacting to every little call that goes against his ballclub. The usual checklist. That said, I want Trembley to blow his stack. Just once. And real soon. For two straight nights, Trembley maintained his cool when he could have gone all Earl Weaver on the home plate umpire. Did the pre-game spread include tranquilizers? He stayed in the dugout in the ninth inning of Tuesday's game, when Toronto's Vernon Wells struck out swinging and drifted in front of catcher Ramon Hernandez, whose throw to second base sailed into center field and allowed Alex Rios to take third.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | June 21, 2005
ONCE, everything Tom McMillen touched turned golden. McMillen made the cover of Sports Illustrated when he was still in high school, starred on the great University of Maryland basketball teams of the early 1970s and played on the U.S. Olympic team. He graduated from College Park, went to Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar, played 11 seasons in the National Basketball Association and served three consecutive terms in the House as the tallest (6 feet 11) congressman in history. But take the ball out of his hands, take him off Capitol Hill, put him in a business suit and McMillen looks more like a carnival barker than a man of accomplishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and By Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
Four years ago, Kara Pruett made an offhand comment about a guy who was standing outside a Fells Point bar on a busy Saturday night talking on his cell phone. "That is so '80s," Kara told a girlfriend walking with her, not thinking the guy on the phone would hear her. "I'm just trying to get a hold of my twin brother," Paul Ullmann answered in his defense. Kara was startled at being overheard, and also surprised, because she, too, was a twin. Later, when she and Paul, along with their friends, ended up at a bar called John Stevens, it seemed only natural that they sit down together and talk about their similar life experiences.
NEWS
June 9, 2008
Are farmers doing enough to aid bay? While I agree that the state should work cooperatively with farmers in the Chesapeake Bay region, I disagree with the notion that farmers have not done their fair share to help clean up the bay. The Sun's editorial "Chicken-hearted?" (June 3) cites the "flush tax" on sewer bills and stricter controls on shoreline development as examples of what non-farmers have done to help the bay. But it neglected to mention that back in 1998, all Maryland's farms were required by the state to develop mandatory nutrient-management plans, even though many Maryland farms were already using voluntary nutrient-management plans.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | October 26, 2006
Media pundits have just about given this year's election to the Democrats - at least in the House of Representatives and perhaps in the Senate as well. They might even be right, for a change. Some are saying that this could be like the 1994 midterm election shocker, when the Republicans seized control of the House of Representatives for the first time in 40 years. If so, the Democrats will win by following the exact opposite strategy from that which brought the congressional Republicans to power in 1994.
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