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Blanche Dubois

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By Laura Whittenberger and Laura Whittenberger,CENTENNIAL HIGH SCHOOL | January 15, 2004
In a whirling burst of passionate desire, the streetcar travels through Hammond High School. An intense, haunting performance of A Streetcar Named Desire at Hammond left the audience sitting awed in their seats, waiting in suspense for each scene. Blanche DuBois, love-ravaged and hopeless, takes refuge in her sister Stella's small house. Events lead to many heart-wrenching arguments and beatings, and Blanche's developing despair becomes increasingly evident as the play progresses. Actress Julia Joseph powerfully plays Blanche, portraying the deep, insecure character very effectively.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 2, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | September 12, 1994
Jessica Tandy, who enhanced the American theater and enriched the American screen as few actresses have, died yesterday at her home in Easton, Conn. She was 85.The cause was ovarian cancer, said her husband, the actor Hume Cronyn.Miss Tandy triumphed on Broadway in 1947 as Blanche Dubois in Tennessee Williams' "Streetcar Named Desire" and was still a great star more than 40 years later when she played the title character in the 1989 film "Driving Miss Daisy." In the years between, she and her husband played opposite each other in success after success to become the most illustrious theater couple of their day.With the role of Blanche Dubois, Miss Tandy emerged from a series of minor film roles to establish herself as one of the leading ladies of the stage.
NEWS
By Laura Whittenberger and Laura Whittenberger,CENTENNIAL HIGH SCHOOL | January 15, 2004
In a whirling burst of passionate desire, the streetcar travels through Hammond High School. An intense, haunting performance of A Streetcar Named Desire at Hammond left the audience sitting awed in their seats, waiting in suspense for each scene. Blanche DuBois, love-ravaged and hopeless, takes refuge in her sister Stella's small house. Events lead to many heart-wrenching arguments and beatings, and Blanche's developing despair becomes increasingly evident as the play progresses. Actress Julia Joseph powerfully plays Blanche, portraying the deep, insecure character very effectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 2, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 9, 2000
Theatre Hopkins has opened its 2000-2001 season with Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning 1947 play, "A Streetcar Named Desire." Cherie Weinert stars as faded Southern belle Blanche DuBois, and Jim Gallagher is her crude brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski, under Suzanne Pratt's direction. The play marks the theater's first Williams drama in more than 20 years. Here's the rest of the season: "Faith Healer," by Brian Friel (Feb. 23-March 25); "She Loves Me," by Joe Masteroff, Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick (April 20-May 20)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 3, 1997
Fifty years ago today, Tennessee Williams' landmark drama, "A Streetcar Named Desire," opened on Broadway. The account of the conflict between Blanche DuBois, a faded Southern belle, and her abusive brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski, won every major award, including the Pulitzer Prize.Elia Kazan directed a cast headed by Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter and Jessica Tandy, whose performance as Blanche made her a star. In his memoirs, Williams wrote: "It was instantly apparent to me that Jessica was Blanche."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 24, 1995
In the thud and blunder, the snap, crackle and hype of the big Thanksgiving film weekend, with heavy hitters Bond, Douglas and De Niro coming to the plate, it would be easy to miss the tiny "Double Happiness," which opens today at the Charles, sharing the marquee with "Persuasion."It would also be a shame.This small Asian-Canadian film is one of the delights that keep a film critic's job interesting. It probably could have been shot twice on "Goldeneye's" weekly doughnut budget. Unpretentious, human and completely absorbing, Mina Shum's movie creeps up on you and takes you over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 4, 1995
It can be tough to separate Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning "A Streetcar Named Desire" from the indelible 1951 movie version and the countless Marlon Brando parodies ("Ste-lllaahhh!!!").So any theater that climbs aboard "Streetcar" has to shed lots of baggage before zeroing in on the text. Olney Theatre Center's current production accomplishes that, and in the process illuminates several aspects of this modern masterpiece.The word "illuminates" is deliberately chosen since light -- or more precisely, the attempt to evade light -- is a defining element of protagonist Blanche DuBois.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | April 21, 1994
Arthur Mitchell, who created the Dance Theatre of Harlem 25 years ago, believes in the power of youth. On Tuesday, his company opened a two-week engagement at the Kennedy Center Opera House with "Bach Passacaglia," a dance that featured 40 young local dancers along with DTH principals Christina Johnson, Tai Jimenez, Eddie J. Shellman and Donald Williams.It was one of those performances when the dance was secondary to what was actually happening -- 40 children were given the chance to become part of Mitchell's dream, to become one of his "seeds" of the future.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | September 12, 1994
Jessica Tandy, who enhanced the American theater and enriched the American screen as few actresses have, died yesterday at her home in Easton, Conn. She was 85.The cause was ovarian cancer, said her husband, the actor Hume Cronyn.Miss Tandy triumphed on Broadway in 1947 as Blanche Dubois in Tennessee Williams' "Streetcar Named Desire" and was still a great star more than 40 years later when she played the title character in the 1989 film "Driving Miss Daisy." In the years between, she and her husband played opposite each other in success after success to become the most illustrious theater couple of their day.With the role of Blanche Dubois, Miss Tandy emerged from a series of minor film roles to establish herself as one of the leading ladies of the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | November 15, 2001
Creepy and original, it's `Sunset Boulevard' The final attraction of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions' fall film series, "Emigres and Divas: The Muse in Exile," is Billy Wilder's creepiest and most original movie, Sunset Boulevard, showing at 7:15 tonight in the Preclinical Teaching Building, 725 N. Wolfe St. The anti-hero of this charged 1950 melodrama is a debt-ridden screenwriter, Joe Gillis (William Holden). On the lam from the finance company that's trying to repossess his car, he wheels into a seemingly abandoned estate that actually belongs to silent-era legend Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 23, 1995
At Towson, festival ends with 'Circus'Towson State University's 1995 Maryland Arts Festival concludes with five performances of Theatricks' "Circus Berserkus" in the Studio Theatre in the Fine Arts Center, Osler and Cross Campus drives.Maryland-based Theatricks specializes in innovative family entertainment and features company co-founder Tom Dougherty, a former Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus clown. Show times are 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. July 29; and 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. July 30. Tickets are $7. For more information, call (410)
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