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Blame Game

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NEWS
January 6, 2014
Some of your letter writers, such as the one busting on liberals for opposing the outsourcing of jobs while welcoming immigrant laborers, must have just woken up from a 20-year snooze like Rip Wan Winkle's ( "Illegal immigrants steal American jobs," Jan. 3). Employers want their employees as cheap and as docile as possible, whether it is in Baltimore's Lower Park Heights or Bhopal, India. To try to stop this is an ineffectual as King Canute trying to stop the sea. If being a liberal means thinking of the welfare of the exploited, I'll be glad to wear that sobriquet.
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NEWS
February 28, 2014
One of the most horrific episodes of the Vietnam war was the plight of those South Vietnamese who were loyal to the United States throughout the war. Known as the "boat people," they desperately, and often fatally, tried to escape Communist retaliation after the fall of Saigon. With the imminent American withdrawal from Afghanistan and the total ineptitude of the central government, it is extremely likely that the Taliban will eventually regain control of the country and will reimpose their strict version of Islam ( "Karzai's blame game," Feb. 2)
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NEWS
September 10, 2004
AN 11TH-HOUR push to call a special legislative session to approve a fall referendum on slot machines came and went this week like a train passing in the night, whistling shrilly. Or rather, more like two trains passing each other in the night, their separate whistles shrilly discordant. Did the two trains - Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and House Speaker Michael E. Busch - actually come very close to forging a deal that would have put slots before voters this November? Hard to tell, with all the whistling.
NEWS
By Craig R. Wonson | February 2, 2014
Two recent incidents in Afghanistan resulted in the deaths of more than 30 civilians. The first was a U.S. airstrike in support of Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) in Parwan Province, the second a Taliban suicide attack on a popular restaurant in Kabul. The circumstances surrounding these two incidents were significantly different. The airstrike was reportedly conducted in-extremis to help save the lives of Afghan and U.S. forces trapped by heavy Taliban fire. In contrast, the Taliban attack on the restaurant was designed to kill as many civilians as possible.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | May 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - Edward M. Kennedy should be ashamed of himself. On Monday, Mr. Kennedy proclaimed from the floor of the Senate, "We now learn Saddam's torture chamber reopened under new management." We have learned no such thing. As disgraceful, vicious and wicked as the actions of a handful of U.S. soldiers at the Abu Ghraib prison were, they are not morally equivalent to the systematic torture and murder of thousands of men, women and children that took place for decades under Saddam Hussein.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 8, 1995
So now the blame game begins. Browns owner Art Modell yesterday accused Ohio government officials and business leaders of back-stabbing him. Cleveland Mayor Michael White responded by calling him a liar.Who's right?Who knows?Who cares?Modell, speaking to reporters at NFL owners meetings near Dallas, gave an eloquent, heartfelt, powerful account of the events that persuaded him to move to Baltimore.And White, appearing at not one but two news conferences, charged that Modell engaged in a "charade" to sabotage yesterday's county tax referendum designed to raise $175 million to renovate Cleveland Stadium.
SPORTS
By Shaun Powell | March 22, 2005
JUNIOR WEIGHED only 125 pounds a few months ago, when he tried out for the team, and was so skinny he had to wear shoes in the shower so he wouldn't slip down the drain. Strange thing, though: All of a sudden, he began to swell up, and pretty soon he was more ripped than a week-old newspaper. His muscles were so big they were pregnant. His clothes, once roomy and baggy, were being stretched tighter than a cheapskate's dollar. He gained 50 pounds just like that and was running faster and hitting baseballs farther than anyone else in school.
FEATURES
By Judith Schlesinger and Judith Schlesinger,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 13, 1998
A country so long complacent about young death in the ghetto has finally been jerked awake by the terrible news out of Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas and Washington state, where freckle-faced kids too young to drive are old enough to gun down their classmates. Suddenly, the argument about parental responsibility has a dark urgency that slams academic debate to the sidelines.Experts have long maintained that parental actions - or the lack of them - are central to shaping a child. This is an awesome mandate in the best of times, but when dysfunction increasingly means violence, there's a rush to diffuse responsibility.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
The GOP has thrown an ideological monkey wrench into the fiasco called the government shutdown, and some 800,000 federal employees have taken the hit ("Obama urges House to vote on ending shutdown," Oct. 8). The shutdown is costing the country a lot of lost revenue and things could get worse. The blame game is not the solution. The problem is that one side of the aisle in Congress is out of touch with reality and, with few exceptions, believes the shutdown is correct. It is not. But though one party is at fault, at this point both parties will take the blame.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
One of the most horrific episodes of the Vietnam war was the plight of those South Vietnamese who were loyal to the United States throughout the war. Known as the "boat people," they desperately, and often fatally, tried to escape Communist retaliation after the fall of Saigon. With the imminent American withdrawal from Afghanistan and the total ineptitude of the central government, it is extremely likely that the Taliban will eventually regain control of the country and will reimpose their strict version of Islam ( "Karzai's blame game," Feb. 2)
NEWS
January 6, 2014
Some of your letter writers, such as the one busting on liberals for opposing the outsourcing of jobs while welcoming immigrant laborers, must have just woken up from a 20-year snooze like Rip Wan Winkle's ( "Illegal immigrants steal American jobs," Jan. 3). Employers want their employees as cheap and as docile as possible, whether it is in Baltimore's Lower Park Heights or Bhopal, India. To try to stop this is an ineffectual as King Canute trying to stop the sea. If being a liberal means thinking of the welfare of the exploited, I'll be glad to wear that sobriquet.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
The GOP has thrown an ideological monkey wrench into the fiasco called the government shutdown, and some 800,000 federal employees have taken the hit ("Obama urges House to vote on ending shutdown," Oct. 8). The shutdown is costing the country a lot of lost revenue and things could get worse. The blame game is not the solution. The problem is that one side of the aisle in Congress is out of touch with reality and, with few exceptions, believes the shutdown is correct. It is not. But though one party is at fault, at this point both parties will take the blame.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 25, 2013
We are just days away from a cataclysm of biblical proportions. The cuts foretold in the Budget Control Act of 2011 are young as far as prophecies go, but apparently they are every bit as terrifying as rivers of blood and plagues of locusts. Any day now we can expect White House spokesman Jay Carney to take to the podium and read a prepared statement: "And when he opened the seventh seal, there was a small decrease in the rate of increase in federal spending. " The great game in Washington is who will get the blame for something both House Speaker John Boehner and President Barack Obama agree will be calamitous for the country.
NEWS
By Kimberly Moffitt | September 27, 2012
The film's plot is predictable: One engaged parent and a dedicated teacher are the beloved heroes, while the teachers' union and an apathetic school board are rendered useless, and at times rogue. "Won't Back Down," in theaters starting Friday, tells the story (inspired by true events) of our decayed public school system in America; and in true Hollywood fashion these two "Norma Raes" give us a fight that stirs our emotions but does little to highlight the complexities of a system that has been broken for decades.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Instead of the confetti, balloons and good will that typically mark the end of the General Assembly's 90-day session, the legislature adjourned Monday with a toxic mixture of anger and disbelief that the Democratic-controlled body gridlocked and was forced to enact a fallback budget that cuts deeply into Democratic spending priorities. The blame game started immediately. One top Democrat called for Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr. to step aside. Political pundits — and the Republican Party — pointed fingers at Gov. Martin O'Malley, saying he's been too busy preparing a presidential run and has neglected his duties in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 5, 2011
Politics often being a contest of survival at all costs, it's not surprising that Herman Cain, harassed by allegations of sexual harassment, has tried to pin the blame on the camp of Republican presidential nominee rival Rick Perry. In an interview with the business magazine Forbes, Mr. Cain indicated he believes the source of the original story in Politico was a Republican political consultant who worked for his failed 2004 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Georgia and now is affiliated with the Perry campaign.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2004
THE "BLAME GAME" has become one of the most popular pastimes in Annapolis. This year's legislative session ended for the second straight year with an energetic round of finger-pointing over the failure of a slot-machine bill and a long-term budget-balancing plan. Was Democratic House Speaker Michael E. Busch at fault for killing the Senate-approved slots plan? Or should Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. bear some responsibility for refusing to accept tax increases that, if combined with slots, could solve Maryland's long-term fiscal problems?
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | May 6, 1992
Washington. -- The immediate tragedy in Los Angeles is over. What happens next?It might get worse. The calamity may be compounded if we draw the wrong lessons from it. We won't get the lessons right if we get the facts wrong. That sequence, alas, played out once before. Will we ever learn?There is, however, something working in America's favor: politics in an election year. The events in Los Angeles will likely become -- and properly so -- the defining symbol of this election.Politics tend to rank the major problems in priority.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
I enjoyed reading Steven Grossman's recent op-ed in which he cleverly pointed out the absurdity of anti-science, creationist-thinking public figures who have a propensity for blaming natural disasters on political enemies ("Hurricane Irene: an almighty wind?" Sept.1). For example, big spending government, gays, lesbians and pro-choice folks were among those who, through the years, have been accused by elected officials (Rep. Michele Bachmann) or televangelists (Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell, etc.)
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
If there was one complaint about the Baltimore Grand Prix from IndyCar drivers Sunday, it was that the course could have used one more area where it was feasible to pass. The course was set up so that drivers had to be patient, and most of them were. But the one time a driver tried to press the issue, the result was chaos. On Lap 37, Ryan Hunter-Reay and Ryan Briscoe were coming around the tightest turn on the course — No. 3, which asked drivers to make a 180-degree change of direction on Light Street — when Briscoe tried to slip inside Hunter-Reay's car. Briscoe's front left tire clipped Hunter-Reay's right side, and both cars spun out, blocking nearly the entire track.
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