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Blair Witch Project

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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 16, 1999
It's somehow fitting that "The Blair Witch Project" should be released the same day as "Eyes Wide Shut."Whereas "Eyes Wide Shut" is opulent to the point of excess, "The Blair Witch Project" is lean and spare, virtually free of visible production values.Whereas "Eyes Wide Shut" is the final stroke from a cinematic genius, "The Blair Witch Project" is the first film of two thirtyish auteurs.And whereas "Eyes Wide Shut" features two huge stars and has all the emotional immediacy of a storefront window, "The Blair Witch Project" features a cast of unknowns and packs an emotional wallop entirely disproportionate to its meager pedigree.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
For much of its 99-minute running time, "Lovely Molly" brings heartbreaking psychological horror to the world of the 99 percent. This story of a young wife (Gretchen Lodge) who goes crazy or is possessed by a demon — or both — takes place in an America of limited opportunities. It's a haunted-house movie with a contemporary existential charge. Molly does cleaning work in a mall and marries Tim (Johnny Lewis), a truck driver who stays away for days on end. They move into her late parents' house — a rambling stone construction in the middle of a desolate nowhere — because she and her devoted sister, Hannah (Alexandra Holden)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
"Lovely Molly," the horrific tale of a woman either demonically possessed or tragically insane, may be the film that makes Eduardo Sanchez someone other than one of the guys responsible for 1999's "The Blair Witch Project. " Which would be fine with the Maryland-raised filmmaker, whose movie gets its local premiere tonight to cap the first day of the 14th Maryland Film Festival. "I love being one of the guys that did 'Blair Witch,' but I'm really proud of 'Lovely Molly,'" Sanchez, 44, said about the film he shot last fall in and around Hagerstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
"Lovely Molly," the horrific tale of a woman either demonically possessed or tragically insane, may be the film that makes Eduardo Sanchez someone other than one of the guys responsible for 1999's "The Blair Witch Project. " Which would be fine with the Maryland-raised filmmaker, whose movie gets its local premiere tonight to cap the first day of the 14th Maryland Film Festival. "I love being one of the guys that did 'Blair Witch,' but I'm really proud of 'Lovely Molly,'" Sanchez, 44, said about the film he shot last fall in and around Hagerstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
A 250-year-old farmhouse, stuck at the end of a long, rutted driveway, with creaking doors, splintered stairs, snakeskins in the basement and a mysterious gaping hole hidden beneath one of the outbuildings. Sounds like the perfect setting for a horror film, right? That's what the makers of "The Possession" thought, too, when they first saw the Hagerstown home that location scouts found for their 20-day film shoot, wrapping this weekend in Western Maryland. And they were right. "This house had its own creepy kind of things that it brought along," says director Eduardo Sanchez, a Marylander who shot to fame as the first-time writer-director of 1999's "The Blair Witch Project," which brought in more than $140 million at the U.S. box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,sun film critic | July 18, 1999
It was surreal at Cannes in May, when they were on a panel moderated by critic Roger Ebert, with Ron Howard at one end of the dais, Spike Lee on the other and John Sayles in between.And it was surreal at Sundance in January, when "The Blair Witch Project" made its triumphant world premiere at the most influential film festival in America."The whole thing was surreal," recalled Myrick over breakfast the morning after the Charles event. "[You've] just come from Orlando, you're knee deep in snow and you're looking at this huge line outside for your film and you're like, 'Wow.
NEWS
By DAVE BERRY and DAVE BERRY,KNIGHT RIDDER/ TRIBUNE | September 19, 1999
RECENTLY IT CAME TO MY attention that I was one of the eight remaining Americans who had not seen "The Blair Witch Project."In case you're one of the other seven, I should explain that "The Blair Witch Project" is a hugely popular movie that was featured simultaneously on the covers of both Time and Newsweek (mottoes: "We Both Have The Same Motto"). "The Blair Witch Project" stunned the Hollywood establishment, because it proved that, to make a hit movie, you don't need big stars, an expensive production and a huge promotional budget to generate hype.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 23, 1999
There will be another casting call for the movie "The Replacements," a comedy starring Keanu Reeves and Gene Hackman that begins filming in Baltimore in August.The production is in search of men between the ages of 21 and 55, with flexible schedules, to portray sideline football players, coaches, trainers, referees and other sideline extras, such as water boys and camera operators. The audition will be held on Wednesday from 5: 30 p.m. until 8: 30 p.m. at Bohager's at Parrot Island, 701 S. Eden St.Bring a recent snapshot with you.If you would like to try out and are unable to attend, send a snapshot with your name, phone number and address on the back to Extras Casting, "The Replacements," P.O. Box 13066, Baltimore, Md. 21203.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 12, 1999
`Runaway Bride' Music from the Motion Picture (Columbia/Soundtrax 69923) `The Blair Witch Project' Josh's Blair Witch Mix (Artisan CHA0120) `Deep Blue Sea' Music from the Motion Picture (Warner Bros. 47485) `Run Lola Run' Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (TVT 8220) `Mystery Men' Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (Interscope 90345) Not having a major studio's support hasn't kept small, independently distributed films from having an impact at the box office this summer.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
The terror du jour is "Paranormal Activity," but it's following the recipe set out by the made-in-Maryland "Blair Witch Project" a decade ago. It's a haunted-house movie, not a haunted forest film like "Blair Witch." But the catch-as-catch-can style, the mood of growing dread, and the conceit that audiences are seeing footage found after the demise of the characters are straight from the "Blair Witch" game plan. No one recognizes the similarities more acutely than Montgomery County native and Frederick resident Eduardo Sanchez, who co-directed "The Blair Witch Project" (with Daniel Myrick)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
A 250-year-old farmhouse, stuck at the end of a long, rutted driveway, with creaking doors, splintered stairs, snakeskins in the basement and a mysterious gaping hole hidden beneath one of the outbuildings. Sounds like the perfect setting for a horror film, right? That's what the makers of "The Possession" thought, too, when they first saw the Hagerstown home that location scouts found for their 20-day film shoot, wrapping this weekend in Western Maryland. And they were right. "This house had its own creepy kind of things that it brought along," says director Eduardo Sanchez, a Marylander who shot to fame as the first-time writer-director of 1999's "The Blair Witch Project," which brought in more than $140 million at the U.S. box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
A low-budget independent film from one of the writer-directors of "The Blair Witch Project" will be shooting in Western Maryland next month, the state Department of Business and Economic Development announced Wednesday. "The Possession" will shoot for about four weeks in Hagerstown and other Washington County locations, writer-director Eduardo Sanchez said. He expects the movie to employ a crew of between 15 and 25 people, and hopes to hire many of them locally. "We're trying to hire as many local people as possible," said Sanchez, who lives in Urbana, near Frederick.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
The terror du jour is "Paranormal Activity," but it's following the recipe set out by the made-in-Maryland "Blair Witch Project" a decade ago. It's a haunted-house movie, not a haunted forest film like "Blair Witch." But the catch-as-catch-can style, the mood of growing dread, and the conceit that audiences are seeing footage found after the demise of the characters are straight from the "Blair Witch" game plan. No one recognizes the similarities more acutely than Montgomery County native and Frederick resident Eduardo Sanchez, who co-directed "The Blair Witch Project" (with Daniel Myrick)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 31, 2001
Here's a movie you won't want to take grandma to see. Cannibal Holocaust, a film so grisly it was widely banned upon its 1979 release, is coming to the Charles tonight, courtesy of the Maryland Film Festival. The story of four filmmakers who vanished while making a documentary about South American cannibals holds little back. (The conceit - this is the footage they shot, found six months after they disappeared - sounds more than a little like The Blair Witch Project, doesn't it?) "This is not an imitation," the film's tagline promises.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
Just as moviegoers can feel intimidated by the number of films that open each week, readers can be overwhelmed by the volume of movie books. From biographies of popular actors to scholarly books on the political implications of specific films to insider Hollywood exposes, finding books that are well-written and accessible but not superficial requires effort. The following releases are the result of our homework. "You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet: The American Talking Film 1927-1949" by Andrew Sarris (Oxford University Press, 573 pages, $18.95, paperback )
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2000
From Civil War notables to Harry Truman and the Duchess of Windsor, the Maryland Historical Society has celebrated plenty of history-makers in its 156 years, but apparently nobody has yet lectured on the art of making up history. Now comes Julia Fair, historian of the twitchy horror film "The Blair Witch Project," a purported documentary that frightened millions of moviegoers last summer. She'll lecture on faking history for a fake documentary. "There are now real answers about the true fake Blair Witch history," she says.
NEWS
August 3, 1999
THE ONLY summer movies that are not gross, immature or truly stupid are made in Maryland. No surprise. These are the box office smasheroos. Maryland is the star. The actors just decorate. But get this: The whole thing is fake. These are not documentaries but acts of the imagination. Maryland is acting. Doesn't matter what role, Maryland can play it. Here we were crying in our milk that "Homicide: Life on the Street," had died. The television drama portrayed Baltimore streets as the archetypal urban pathology in America.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2000
If Burkittsville doesn't want the sequel to "The Blair Witch Project," Manchester might. Manchester Town Councilwoman Mary Minderlein made the suggestion Tuesday night, near the end of a routine meeting. The Frederick County town that was the locale for last summer's surprise hit movie sent producers packing last month at the prospect of being the location for the sequel, she noted, "so the Maryland film council is looking for another town. They want to hear from Maryland towns." "I had the idea that Manchester would be a good place, maybe, to have the movie, and we should put our hat in the ring, so to speak," she said.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2000
If Burkittsville doesn't want the sequel to "The Blair Witch Project," Manchester might. Manchester Town Councilwoman Mary Minderlein made the suggestion Tuesday night, near the end of a routine meeting. The Frederick County town that was the locale for last summer's surprise hit movie sent producers packing last month at the prospect of being the location for the sequel, she noted, "so the Maryland film council is looking for another town. They want to hear from Maryland towns." "I had the idea that Manchester would be a good place, maybe, to have the movie, and we should put our hat in the ring, so to speak," she said.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2000
BURKITTSVILLE -- The folks in this farm country hamlet south of Frederick have had as much as they can take of the attention generated by the film "Blair Witch Project." The last thing they want is to see things stirred up again by a sequel. Accordingly, they sent the producers of "Blair Witch Project 2" packing from a town meeting Monday, hurling insults after them. Yesterday, only a few residents of this town of 200 at the base of South Mountain would discuss the fracas, and most who did talk wouldn't give their names.
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