Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlair Underwood
IN THE NEWS

Blair Underwood

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By WESLEY MORRIS and WESLEY MORRIS,THE BOSTON GLOBE | February 27, 2006
It's probably useful to think of Madea's Family Reunion as a department store. There's something for almost anybody. Shopping for a paperback melodrama? It's on the first floor. Looking for a gospel sermon? Try the third. Bawdy physical comedy? The cellar, obviously. Some parts of Tyler Perry's new movie are better than others - and all of it is better than Diary of a Mad Black Woman, his last one. Perry wrote, directed, produced, and scored Family Reunion and plays three characters in the film.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | June 9, 2008
LOS ANGELES - A pregnant woman approached with three tots in tow. "I am so sorry," she said, one hand on her protruding belly, the other covering her mouth. "I love you. I love you," she gushed as she got closer to Blair Underwood, dining at Clementine, a sidewalk cafe in Los Angeles. "It was the funniest thing when you were on that show, Christine," the woman said. "I was dying. The whole time I was dying." "I was too 'cause I loved it," replied Underwood, who has been toiling in TV and film for two decades and might just get his first Emmy nomination this year, if buzz is a reliable barometer of such things.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2005
Andre Royo knows he's a lucky man. In a way, that's the problem. Royo, familiar to Baltimoreans as the hard-luck drug addict Bubbles on HBO's The Wire, stars with Richard T. Jones and Blair Underwood in G, an African-American take on The Great Gatsby that opened in theaters last week. Royo plays Tre, an enterprising journalist whose beautiful cousin once was linked to musician Summer G -- a connection Tre exploits to tragic ends. But what makes Royo consider himself lucky is not his rising prominence on both the big and small screens.
FEATURES
By VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT NEWS SERVICE | July 17, 2006
Charlie Gibson is making it interesting in the evening news race. Ever since the former Good Morning America co-anchor took the helm of World News Tonight, the broadcast has either tied or won the coveted 25-54 demographic against NBC's once-dominant Nightly News. In a week shortened by the July 4 holiday and with Diane Sawyer at the helm, ABC defeated NBC's Brian Williams in both the 25-54 demo and total viewers. ABC News senior VP Paul Slavin said it's a sign that the news race is going to be tight this fall, especially with Katie Couric joining the fray at CBS. "NBC is going to face some really tough competition from Katie and some really tough competition from Charlie," Slavin said.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 3, 2005
Blair Underwood has spent his career refusing to kowtow to Hollywood stereotypes. And that's why he's proud to be starring in G, a movie dominated by African-American characters and set in the upscale, moneyed world of the Long Island shoreline. The 40-year-old actor and his co-stars, Richard T. Jones and Andre Royo, are scheduled to be in Baltimore on Tuesday night for an invitation-only screening at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. G opens in theaters Sept.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
What happens when a fish out of water doesn't even realize he's a fish? Such is the unrecognized quandary facing young Brad Gluckman, a privileged Malibu teen who sees himself as the rap-master bad boy of California's Gold Coast. Not only is he way too white and way too rich to have much in the way of street cred; he's also just about the world's worst rapper. But none of that matters to the genially oblivious Brad - or B-Rad, as he'd rather be known - who's talked the talk for far too long to let anything get in the way of the soft-core gangsta persona he's built for himself in the 'Bu. Malibu's Most Wanted mines a well-worn comedic vein, but does so with a consistent good humor and surprisingly deft touch.
FEATURES
By VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT NEWS SERVICE | July 17, 2006
Charlie Gibson is making it interesting in the evening news race. Ever since the former Good Morning America co-anchor took the helm of World News Tonight, the broadcast has either tied or won the coveted 25-54 demographic against NBC's once-dominant Nightly News. In a week shortened by the July 4 holiday and with Diane Sawyer at the helm, ABC defeated NBC's Brian Williams in both the 25-54 demo and total viewers. ABC News senior VP Paul Slavin said it's a sign that the news race is going to be tight this fall, especially with Katie Couric joining the fray at CBS. "NBC is going to face some really tough competition from Katie and some really tough competition from Charlie," Slavin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 14, 1993
C Mario Van Peebles didn't just want to make a western. He wanted to make every western.And in "Posse," he gets about 90 percent of them.The movie is insanely ambitious, completely captivating and maybe only six plot twists too incoherent. It has style to burn; too bad it didn't burn a few pages of script somewhere in the process.The curiosity is that Van Peebles, son of legendary Melvin Van Peebles of "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," is much more interesting as a director than as an actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 17, 1995
Arne Glimcher's "Just Cause" had to be in the pipeline years before the prospects of political victory turned Newt Gingrich's beady li'l eyes round and glassy as saucers, but you wouldn't know it to see the film. It feels as if the first day of principal photography was Nov. 8.The movie, which masquerades (more or less effectively) as a thriller, is really a polemic about the deconstruction of a liberal in specific and liberalism in general. It's a textbook illustration of the fact that the feature narrative can be an effective device for the communication of political ideas.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | June 9, 2008
LOS ANGELES - A pregnant woman approached with three tots in tow. "I am so sorry," she said, one hand on her protruding belly, the other covering her mouth. "I love you. I love you," she gushed as she got closer to Blair Underwood, dining at Clementine, a sidewalk cafe in Los Angeles. "It was the funniest thing when you were on that show, Christine," the woman said. "I was dying. The whole time I was dying." "I was too 'cause I loved it," replied Underwood, who has been toiling in TV and film for two decades and might just get his first Emmy nomination this year, if buzz is a reliable barometer of such things.
FEATURES
By WESLEY MORRIS and WESLEY MORRIS,THE BOSTON GLOBE | February 27, 2006
It's probably useful to think of Madea's Family Reunion as a department store. There's something for almost anybody. Shopping for a paperback melodrama? It's on the first floor. Looking for a gospel sermon? Try the third. Bawdy physical comedy? The cellar, obviously. Some parts of Tyler Perry's new movie are better than others - and all of it is better than Diary of a Mad Black Woman, his last one. Perry wrote, directed, produced, and scored Family Reunion and plays three characters in the film.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2005
Andre Royo knows he's a lucky man. In a way, that's the problem. Royo, familiar to Baltimoreans as the hard-luck drug addict Bubbles on HBO's The Wire, stars with Richard T. Jones and Blair Underwood in G, an African-American take on The Great Gatsby that opened in theaters last week. Royo plays Tre, an enterprising journalist whose beautiful cousin once was linked to musician Summer G -- a connection Tre exploits to tragic ends. But what makes Royo consider himself lucky is not his rising prominence on both the big and small screens.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 3, 2005
Blair Underwood has spent his career refusing to kowtow to Hollywood stereotypes. And that's why he's proud to be starring in G, a movie dominated by African-American characters and set in the upscale, moneyed world of the Long Island shoreline. The 40-year-old actor and his co-stars, Richard T. Jones and Andre Royo, are scheduled to be in Baltimore on Tuesday night for an invitation-only screening at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. G opens in theaters Sept.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
What happens when a fish out of water doesn't even realize he's a fish? Such is the unrecognized quandary facing young Brad Gluckman, a privileged Malibu teen who sees himself as the rap-master bad boy of California's Gold Coast. Not only is he way too white and way too rich to have much in the way of street cred; he's also just about the world's worst rapper. But none of that matters to the genially oblivious Brad - or B-Rad, as he'd rather be known - who's talked the talk for far too long to let anything get in the way of the soft-core gangsta persona he's built for himself in the 'Bu. Malibu's Most Wanted mines a well-worn comedic vein, but does so with a consistent good humor and surprisingly deft touch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 17, 1995
Arne Glimcher's "Just Cause" had to be in the pipeline years before the prospects of political victory turned Newt Gingrich's beady li'l eyes round and glassy as saucers, but you wouldn't know it to see the film. It feels as if the first day of principal photography was Nov. 8.The movie, which masquerades (more or less effectively) as a thriller, is really a polemic about the deconstruction of a liberal in specific and liberalism in general. It's a textbook illustration of the fact that the feature narrative can be an effective device for the communication of political ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 14, 1993
C Mario Van Peebles didn't just want to make a western. He wanted to make every western.And in "Posse," he gets about 90 percent of them.The movie is insanely ambitious, completely captivating and maybe only six plot twists too incoherent. It has style to burn; too bad it didn't burn a few pages of script somewhere in the process.The curiosity is that Van Peebles, son of legendary Melvin Van Peebles of "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," is much more interesting as a director than as an actor.
NEWS
February 8, 1995
IF things seem to be the usual mess in the nation's Capitol, it may be helpful to remember these words of President John F. Kennedy, in a speech during his first year in the White House:"When we got into office, the thing that surprised me most was to find that things were just as bad as we'd been saying they were."* * *REP. Kweisi Mfume, who recently stepped down as chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, is on the cover of a national magazine this month. Is this in recognition of his work on Capitol Hill?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 16, 2005
Does hip-hop have heart?" a journalist repeatedly asks in G, as though the answer is both mysterious and revelatory. Of course, as anyone who's ever heard Diddy sing "I'll Be Missing You" can attest, hip-hop has plenty of heart. And that's pretty much the problem with G, too: It tries way too hard to find answers that everyone already knows. Envisioned as an African-American version of The Great Gatsby, with hip-hop replacing jazz as the soundtrack of Long Island's opulent Hamptons community, G tells its story in strokes way too broad for its own good.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.