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By Dan Berger | May 5, 1997
Fortuitously, the president's guest house across Pennsylvania Avenue is Blair House.It's the arms race deja vu. Hopkins researchers made mightier mice. Next, UMAB rivals will invent a stronger cat. There will be no end to it.Bill bought a Republican budget and will claim credit for having thought it up.Mike Royko has gone to tell off the establishment in a better place.Pub Date: 5/05/97
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NEWS
August 8, 2006
William Draper Blair Jr., 79, former president of the Nature Conservancy and a State Department spokesman who earlier had been a newspaper reporter, died Saturday from complications of multiple system atrophy, a rare brain disorder, at his summer home in Vinalhaven, Maine. Born in Charlotte, N.C., and raised in Washington and New York City, Mr. Blair was a 1949 graduate of Princeton University and began his career that year in Baltimore at The Evening Sun. Sent to Korea as one of the Sunpapers' war correspondents, he was shot in the back by a North Korean sniper while covering a Marines operation along the Han River.
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NEWS
January 22, 1993
OUR favorite moment Wednesday was captured by an unforgiving camera as the Clintons prepared to leave Blair House on their way to meet President and Mrs. Bush at the White House.The president-elect and his daughter appeared, and Chelsea hopped into the waiting limousine. But her father stood looking back to the doorway, calling, we assume, to his wife Hillary.After several tense comments like "Come on," and "Chelsea's in the car," Mrs. Clinton emerged briskly from Blair House. She and her husband quickly got into the waiting limo and were whisked the short distance to their new home.
NEWS
February 11, 2003
Michael T. Blair, a former partner in Yorkleigh Contractors and a self-employed housing inspector, died of a heart attack Wednesday at his Hunt Valley home. He was 82. Born and raised in the Colgate section of Baltimore, Mr. Blair was a 1939 graduate of Towson Catholic High School. In 1941, he went to work for a construction company in Trinidad that was building a large military airfield. He subsequently worked with the Army Corps of Engineers in French Guiana, before returning to Baltimore and enlisting in the Navy in 1944.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | January 10, 1994
One of my neighbors told me a cute story that I would like to pass on as a helpful holiday hint if you lose your car keys next Christmas.My neighbor's daughter and her 2-year-old son were visiting him Christmas Day. Later, as they were about to go home, she could not find her keys even though she clearly remembered putting them in her purse.After a thorough search of the house, the driveway and the car failed to locate them, my neighbor recalled he had a spare set of keys in his house.The mystery continued for four more days until a sharp eye spied the keys shining among the lights and ornaments on the Christmas tree.
NEWS
September 27, 1993
If NAFTA goes down the drain, can GATT be far behind? In the mind of Peter Sutherland, the forceful Irish director-general of the 116-nation General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, there is a clear and present danger that this could be the case.The defeat of the North American Free Trade Agreement in the U.S. Congress, now an ominous probability, "would put wind in the sails of the protectionist lobby," according to Mr. Sutherland. "Those who oppose multilateralism are the same as those who would oppose regional integration."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- I am amazed that a guy can crash a plane into the White House without anybody firing a shot at him.In Washington, you can hardly walk down the street at night without drawing some kind of fire.But a guy flies into the president's house and the Secret Service doesn't even snap off a few rounds?Something is very wrong here.While it is true, as everyone is now saying, that a person willing to trade his life for the president's may be able to kill him, that does not mean we should make it easy.
NEWS
February 5, 1998
PRIME MINISTER TONY BLAIR of Britain was such a Clinton wannabe in swinging his leftish Labor Party to the center and adopting his opponent's planks and personifying youthful vigor that his supporters joked about it.Then the ever-grinning Mr. Blair won the election in May, emerging as undisputed master of British politics, not merely prime minister but commanding a huge parliamentary majority. Meanwhile, his model in Washington faces a Republican Congress and cannot expect many of his proposals to be enacted.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
The security of the president and the sanctity of the White House are paramount considerations. So is the ability of U.S. citizens to move freely about their homes and work places without undue disruption. How to balance such considerations in these days of wanton terrorism is not easy.An advisory panel has recommended Pennsylvania Avenue be closed to vehicles in front of the White House. Though the study was stimulated by earlier incidents at the White House, it took on new urgency after the Oklahoma City bombing.
NEWS
August 8, 2006
William Draper Blair Jr., 79, former president of the Nature Conservancy and a State Department spokesman who earlier had been a newspaper reporter, died Saturday from complications of multiple system atrophy, a rare brain disorder, at his summer home in Vinalhaven, Maine. Born in Charlotte, N.C., and raised in Washington and New York City, Mr. Blair was a 1949 graduate of Princeton University and began his career that year in Baltimore at The Evening Sun. Sent to Korea as one of the Sunpapers' war correspondents, he was shot in the back by a North Korean sniper while covering a Marines operation along the Han River.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Israel and Syria took "critical steps in the journey toward peace" in negotiations here over the past two days, President Clinton said yesterday, with the two sides agreeing to return here for more-intensive talks on Jan. 3.The meetings between Prime Minister Ehud Barak of Israel and Foreign Minister Farouq al-Sharaa of Syria, described as formal but cordial by U.S. officials, were the highest-level talks ever conducted between their countries.Secretary...
NEWS
February 5, 1998
PRIME MINISTER TONY BLAIR of Britain was such a Clinton wannabe in swinging his leftish Labor Party to the center and adopting his opponent's planks and personifying youthful vigor that his supporters joked about it.Then the ever-grinning Mr. Blair won the election in May, emerging as undisputed master of British politics, not merely prime minister but commanding a huge parliamentary majority. Meanwhile, his model in Washington faces a Republican Congress and cannot expect many of his proposals to be enacted.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 5, 1997
Fortuitously, the president's guest house across Pennsylvania Avenue is Blair House.It's the arms race deja vu. Hopkins researchers made mightier mice. Next, UMAB rivals will invent a stronger cat. There will be no end to it.Bill bought a Republican budget and will claim credit for having thought it up.Mike Royko has gone to tell off the establishment in a better place.Pub Date: 5/05/97
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- At a one-day retreat, President Clinton and his top aides outlined an ambitious series of goals in international affairs but a second term of scaled-down expectations in domestic policy.Foremost among the domestic concerns, according to officials who briefed reporters afterward yesterday, were balancing the budget and working cooperatively with the Republicans who control Congress."He put a special stress on bipartisanship," said White House press secretary Mike McCurry. "In fact, that emerged as a point of discussion throughout the day in each of the areas discussed -- how important it was to reach out to especially the Republican leadership of Congress, and work closely with them."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The first reaction to the closing of Pennsylvania Avenue this weekend among the bureaucrats, politicians, tourists, journalists and locals who coexist here was the disquieting sense that things might never be the same.For those who work here, closing the street in front of the White House will mean worse rush-hour gridlock. For those who visit, the relaxed days when Aunt Maude could stop her car right in front of the presidential mansion and snap a picture are gone, too.But the two-block closing also symbolizes profound changes in American life, changes that do not seem for the better.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
The security of the president and the sanctity of the White House are paramount considerations. So is the ability of U.S. citizens to move freely about their homes and work places without undue disruption. How to balance such considerations in these days of wanton terrorism is not easy.An advisory panel has recommended Pennsylvania Avenue be closed to vehicles in front of the White House. Though the study was stimulated by earlier incidents at the White House, it took on new urgency after the Oklahoma City bombing.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | January 24, 1993
Amid the stirring images of Inauguration Day, the television cameras recorded a more human moment.Following a tight schedule, the president-elect and his daughter, Chelsea, emerged from Blair House Wednesday morning on their way to greet President and Mrs. Bush at the White House. Chelsea hopped into the waiting limousine, but her father stood looking back to the doorway, calling, we assume, to his wife, Hillary.A few tense comments were audible, something like, "Come on, we have to be there," "Chelsea's in the car," or "Somebody can find it and bring it to her."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- At a one-day retreat, President Clinton and his top aides outlined an ambitious series of goals in international affairs but a second term of scaled-down expectations in domestic policy.Foremost among the domestic concerns, according to officials who briefed reporters afterward yesterday, were balancing the budget and working cooperatively with the Republicans who control Congress."He put a special stress on bipartisanship," said White House press secretary Mike McCurry. "In fact, that emerged as a point of discussion throughout the day in each of the areas discussed -- how important it was to reach out to especially the Republican leadership of Congress, and work closely with them."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Clinton administration officials emphasized yesterday that Saturday's shooting at the White House underscored the wisdom of controlling firearms, but the terrifying incident also raised the issue of whether there is something fundamentally wrong with the way President Clinton is being protected."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- I am amazed that a guy can crash a plane into the White House without anybody firing a shot at him.In Washington, you can hardly walk down the street at night without drawing some kind of fire.But a guy flies into the president's house and the Secret Service doesn't even snap off a few rounds?Something is very wrong here.While it is true, as everyone is now saying, that a person willing to trade his life for the president's may be able to kill him, that does not mean we should make it easy.
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