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November 4, 1991
Director Ridley Scott's own cut of his 1982 cult favorite "Blade Runner" has been unearthed by Warner Bros. and is headed for theaters.Scott's cut already has been screened to SRO crowds in Los Angeles earlier this year.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Aerospace firm Sigma Space Corp. has joined fellow Maryland companies Under Armour and Lockheed Martin in developing technology to help the U.S. Speedskating team at the Winter Olympics. Lanham-based Sigma Space said Friday its optical and mechanical engineers have been at work on a secret project since the fall to enhance skaters performance. Through its "Blade Runner" mission, the company aimed to build a tool that could polish skate blade sides, which never go through the sharpening common to blade bottoms.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2007
The 25th anniversary version of Blade Runner comes to Baltimore's Senator Theatre next Friday. Tagged as The Final Cut, this is supposed to be the absolutely, positively, this-time-we-really-mean-it, definitive version of Ridley Scott's 1982 film. Let's hope so. Nothing against Blade Runner, which is a fascinating film, the happy result of a visionary director (Scott) being let loose on the work of a startlingly hallucinatory writer (Philip K. Dick, who wrote the source material, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2007
The 25th anniversary version of Blade Runner comes to Baltimore's Senator Theatre next Friday. Tagged as The Final Cut, this is supposed to be the absolutely, positively, this-time-we-really-mean-it, definitive version of Ridley Scott's 1982 film. Let's hope so. Nothing against Blade Runner, which is a fascinating film, the happy result of a visionary director (Scott) being let loose on the work of a startlingly hallucinatory writer (Philip K. Dick, who wrote the source material, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 11, 1992
Forget Sarajevo. Forget AIDS. Forget the campaign. On now to the only serious issue of the summer: Is Harrison Ford a replicant?This disturbing rumor has circulated since 1982, when Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner" was initially released to indifferent business from the masses but zealous adoration from a narrow band of zealots.The hallucinatory, visionary movie, surely one of the most provocative and befuddling ever made, has been rereleased in a "director's cut," giving Scott the last word on his own story and a chance to clear up its meanings.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | March 3, 1992
Ridley Scott's "true cut" of "Blade Runner," originally slated for release this month, has been pushed back to fall so the Oscar-nominated director (for "Thelma & Louise") can further refine his re-edit of his 1982 science fiction thriller starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Daryl Hannah and Sean Young.Mr Scott needs to finish "Christopher Columbus," with Gerard Depardieu in the title role, first.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 26, 1996
Halfway through "Screamers" I kept thinking it would do much better under a title like "The Revenge of Punxsutawney Phil." It appears to be about killer groundhogs eating everything human they can get their chubby little cheeks wrapped around.No such luck. (And I really would like to see a movie called "The Revenge of Punxsutawney Phil"!) Instead, the beasties under the ground, who for some odd reason trail a wake of dirt wherever they burrow like subterranean PT boats, turn out not to be animals but machines, something like runaway, psychotic Weed Eaters.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Aerospace firm Sigma Space Corp. has joined fellow Maryland companies Under Armour and Lockheed Martin in developing technology to help the U.S. Speedskating team at the Winter Olympics. Lanham-based Sigma Space said Friday its optical and mechanical engineers have been at work on a secret project since the fall to enhance skaters performance. Through its "Blade Runner" mission, the company aimed to build a tool that could polish skate blade sides, which never go through the sharpening common to blade bottoms.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter VIDEO 'Gladiator' loud, crude | October 10, 1992
MOVIE'1492'"1492: Conquest of Paradise" is a revisionist version of the discovery of the New World from the painterly hand of Ridley ("Blade Runner") Scott. Gerard Depardieu plays a Columbus who saw in the New World a chance for an escape from European oppression and ended up with a violent revolution on his hands. The movie meanders toward the end, but it's great to see a big budget, intelligent, moving costume drama of the sort that hasn't shown up in years. PG-13. ** 1/2 stars. Gladiator" is one of those thumping boxing movies that seems to have stepped out of the '30s with only its musical score adjusted to rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 9, 1992
Ridley Scott's "1492: Conquest of Paradise" portrays Christopher Columbus less as the admiral of the ocean seas than as the world's first James Rouse. He wanted to build the new town of Columbia on Santo Domingo, rather than in a Howard County cow pasture. He just couldn't get the zoning changed for a mall, or the brotherhood of man.The movie is so much better than the recent "Columbus: The Discovery" that it's almost sacrilegious to mention them in the same breath and anyone who does should be burned at the stake.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 13, 2002
When Metropolis premiered in Berlin in 1927, no one had seen anything like it. For Baltimoreans, the same is true today. The movie spills over with wonders, like a sci-fi horn of plenty - and in the restored version opening today for a week's run at the Senator, for the first time all the marvels fall into place. Pauline Kael rightly noted that H.G. Wells called it "quite the silliest movie." Yet director-designer William Cameron Menzies must have looked at it before shooting Wells' Things to Come.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
For the sake of research, Mike Boris got a little too frisky at the wheel of his riding mower last June while weaving be- tween the trees of his suburban back yard. He took a curve at 25 mph and - boom! - struck a big oak head-on, tumbling over the steering wheel onto the dented hood while the right front wheel spun away across the lawn. On some streets, that might bring the neighbors to their windows. Not on Whitegate Road in Clarksville, where people have grown accustomed to the Borises and their speedy mowers.
FEATURES
July 11, 2000
Spears, 'N Sync singer not engaged Teen pop sensation Britney Spears and boy band 'N Sync vocalist Justin Timberlake are just friends and have no plans to get married, contrary to British media reports they were engaged, their publicist said yesterday. The News of the World newspaper, Britain's biggest-selling tabloid, reported Sunday that Timberlake had popped the question two weeks ago and that Spears had accepted. The paper cited an unnamed source as saying no date had been set. "Contrary to what has been erroneously reported, Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake are neither engaged or married," said a statement issued yesterday by the singers' publicist, Lisa Kasteler.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 2, 2000
SHANGHAI, China -- After littering the skylines of its cities with anonymous high-rises, China has built its first world-class skyscraper by mining the architectural heritage of both East and West. Combining art-deco lines reminiscent of New York's Chrysler Building with the tapered form of a Chinese pagoda, the Jin Mao Tower creates a striking presence over this urban landscape of more than 14 million. The 88-story building, which opened last year, has emerged as a landmark in Shanghai's new Pudong district, which until recently was mostly fields and factories.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 8, 1999
It has come to this: I am now dreaming about Santiago.It's dark and wet, and Santiago -- with that fierce, black slash of a pencil mustache -- is chasing me through the woods. A chorus of faceless people in rags -- right out of "Blade Runner" -- is chanting, "Get Santiago, get Santiago, get Santiago or die, fool."Thanks a lot, Chris Carter, for burning "Harsh Realm" into my brain. Just what I needed, another scary TV dream and more weird video characters running around inside my head.I am not kidding about the dream.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 24, 1999
Like "Mumford," the Lawrence Kasdan comedy that opens today, "The Minus Man" has to do with a charismatic stranger who arrives out of nowhere in a small, attractive town, and whose presence proceeds to unsettle the lives of its inhabitants. Actually, "unsettle" is a euphemism for more sinister forces that lurk underneath the drifter's sunny, accommodating persona.Luckily, "The Minus Man," based on the novel by Lew McCreary, stars Owen Wilson, whose golden good looks, toothily ingratiating smile and beguilingly imperfect nose make him a sympathetic character no matter how menacing he becomes.
FEATURES
July 11, 2000
Spears, 'N Sync singer not engaged Teen pop sensation Britney Spears and boy band 'N Sync vocalist Justin Timberlake are just friends and have no plans to get married, contrary to British media reports they were engaged, their publicist said yesterday. The News of the World newspaper, Britain's biggest-selling tabloid, reported Sunday that Timberlake had popped the question two weeks ago and that Spears had accepted. The paper cited an unnamed source as saying no date had been set. "Contrary to what has been erroneously reported, Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake are neither engaged or married," said a statement issued yesterday by the singers' publicist, Lisa Kasteler.
NEWS
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to The Sun | February 26, 1995
PTC Vurt," by Jeff Noon. 352 pages. New York: Crown Publishing. $22In the beginning, back in the 1980s, there was the cyberpunk novel, a science-fiction subgenre that explored the computer-generated worlds of virtual reality. Now, in the 1990s, new authors and recombinant forms are emerging from the corpus of cyberpunk fiction, once dominated by the American writers William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. The most prominent newcomer is the Manchester-born Englishman Jeff Noon, whose first novel, a cyber-fairy tale called " Vurt," was this year's winner of Britain's Arthur C. Clarke award for science fiction.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 26, 1996
Halfway through "Screamers" I kept thinking it would do much better under a title like "The Revenge of Punxsutawney Phil." It appears to be about killer groundhogs eating everything human they can get their chubby little cheeks wrapped around.No such luck. (And I really would like to see a movie called "The Revenge of Punxsutawney Phil"!) Instead, the beasties under the ground, who for some odd reason trail a wake of dirt wherever they burrow like subterranean PT boats, turn out not to be animals but machines, something like runaway, psychotic Weed Eaters.
NEWS
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to The Sun | February 26, 1995
PTC Vurt," by Jeff Noon. 352 pages. New York: Crown Publishing. $22In the beginning, back in the 1980s, there was the cyberpunk novel, a science-fiction subgenre that explored the computer-generated worlds of virtual reality. Now, in the 1990s, new authors and recombinant forms are emerging from the corpus of cyberpunk fiction, once dominated by the American writers William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. The most prominent newcomer is the Manchester-born Englishman Jeff Noon, whose first novel, a cyber-fairy tale called " Vurt," was this year's winner of Britain's Arthur C. Clarke award for science fiction.
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