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By Mary Ann Zehr and Mary Ann Zehr,Special to The Sun | May 11, 1997
Here was a place I did not want to disturb.Ten of us, each in separate, 15-foot-long kayaks, tried to make our way to the shore of the Blackwater River in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge for a lunch stop without displacing huge sections of waterlily pads. My husband and I had ventured out on a one-day summer kayaking trip to this secluded Dorchester County spot. And during our time on the water, we saw no one other than the people in our group.Lining both shorelines were acres of waterlily pads -- supporting hundreds of delicate pink and off-white flowers -- interwoven together in clusters and rooted to the bottom of the river by slender threads of plant material.
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By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
On a low-humidity puffy-cloud summer day, 8-year-old Zach Green of Gaithersburg rode a bicycle along the 5-mile Wildlife Drive in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge with his mother, Becky Green, and his grandmother, Andrea Adler, who lives in Bethesda. The three stopped at the first observation site along the drive, propped their bikes on kickstands and began walking up a short boardwalk to the spot where two sets of binoculars were available for searching the marshy grasses and slow-moving Blackwater River.
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NEWS
April 19, 2007
The state Board of Public Works agreed yesterday to spend $10.3 million to purchase 728 acres near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge to preserve forests and farmland that had been threatened by a proposed golf resort. With Comptroller Peter Franchot absent, Gov. Martin O'Malley and state Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp approved the deal, ending a battle of more than year between developer Duane Zentgraf and environmental groups. The decision means that Zentgraf can build 675 homes for senior citizens on 328 acres along Egypt Road.
NEWS
April 19, 2007
The state Board of Public Works agreed yesterday to spend $10.3 million to purchase 728 acres near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge to preserve forests and farmland that had been threatened by a proposed golf resort. With Comptroller Peter Franchot absent, Gov. Martin O'Malley and state Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp approved the deal, ending a battle of more than year between developer Duane Zentgraf and environmental groups. The decision means that Zentgraf can build 675 homes for senior citizens on 328 acres along Egypt Road.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | October 5, 2006
A state commission voted yesterday to block a proposed $1 billion golf resort near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, handing a surprise victory to environmentalists who feared the huge project would clutter one of the Chesapeake region's most beautiful landscapes. The state Critical Area Commission, which reviews construction in waterfront areas, said the developer cannot build a conference center, hotel and retail complex on 313 acres of farms and wetlands next to the Little Blackwater River.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA AND TOM PELTON and JENNIFER SKALKA AND TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTERS | March 25, 2006
The Maryland Senate killed a bill yesterday that sought to limit development near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on the Eastern Shore, handing a victory to advocates of growth and local control. Sen. James Brochin, the Baltimore County Democrat who sponsored the legislation, attributed the defeat to an influx of lobbyists working for the developer who wants to build a $1 billion resort community near the refuge. But even Democratic leaders -- Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden of Baltimore -- voted against the bill, which would have barred construction on about a third of the 1,080-acre site in an environmentally sensitive area along Little Blackwater River.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | February 28, 2006
Local officials have told the developer of a proposed resort and conference center near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge to modify his plans, a move that is expected to delay the project for several months. The Cambridge City Council had been scheduled to vote on the final plan for the 3,200-home subdivision last night. But the vote has been put off while the developer, Duane E.E. Zentgraf, prepares a redesign that moves about 180 homes so they are at least 1,000 feet from the Little Blackwater River, said Anne Roane, city planner.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest joined yesterday with those supporting legislation that would limit the size of a 3,200-home golf resort planned near the entrance of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. "We have a juggernaut of developers seeing open space where they can develop houses," said Gilchrest, an Eastern Shore Republican. "Do we sit back passively so we can be consumed by more impervious surfaces and more landfills?" Gilchrest spoke at a hearing in Annapolis on a bill sponsored by state Sen. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, that would prohibit construction in environmentally critical areas within 1,000 feet of rivers flowing into national wildlife refuges.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
As a state commission considers voting today on whether to allow a 2,700-home golf resort near Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, it must weigh whether state law prohibits such intense development in an area surrounded by protected wetlands and farms. But even as debate over the $1 billion Blackwater Resort continues, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. - whose administration had called approval of the project a mostly local decision - is studying requests to preserve some of the land with state money, an aide said yesterday.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON and CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTERS | August 22, 2006
CAMBRIDGE -- Plans for a billion-dollar golf resort community that has drawn protests from environmentalists won approval yesterday evening from the Cambridge City Council. The 2,700-home Blackwater Resort project - which opponents view as sprawl that would endanger the nearby Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge - now must receive approval from a state commission appointed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that reviews construction within 1,000 feet of Chesapeake Bay tributaries. Supporters hope the construction on top of wetlands and farm fields will bring thousands of new residents - and millions in tax dollars - to a city of about 11,000 that has lost population since the 1960s.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | October 5, 2006
A state commission voted yesterday to block a proposed $1 billion golf resort near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, handing a surprise victory to environmentalists who feared the huge project would clutter one of the Chesapeake region's most beautiful landscapes. The state Critical Area Commission, which reviews construction in waterfront areas, said the developer cannot build a conference center, hotel and retail complex on 313 acres of farms and wetlands next to the Little Blackwater River.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
As a state commission considers voting today on whether to allow a 2,700-home golf resort near Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, it must weigh whether state law prohibits such intense development in an area surrounded by protected wetlands and farms. But even as debate over the $1 billion Blackwater Resort continues, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. - whose administration had called approval of the project a mostly local decision - is studying requests to preserve some of the land with state money, an aide said yesterday.
NEWS
September 3, 2006
Blackwater Resort will hurt watershed The Sun's editorial "Bad day at Blackwater" (Aug. 27) failed to mention one important issue regarding the Blackwater Resort controversy: A Mason-Dixon Polling & Research survey conducted in Dorchester County found that 73 percent of the voters opposed changing the zoning to allow intensive development of the critical area near the Little Blackwater River. Many of the people who have been protesting against the project at council meetings are Dorchester County residents.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
If you're going to sell your soul, make sure you get a sweet deal, because you'll never get it back. That's the wisdom the Cambridge City Council should have taken to heart before it voted last week in favor of a billion-dollar resort community proposed for the southern edge of the Dorchester County town. Cambridge is the jewel of the Choptank River, and that pretty river is the matriarch of all Eastern Shore waterways. But the town's once-substantial cachet - Annie Oakley, the Wild West Show sharpshooter, liked Cambridge so much that she retired there - has suffered through decades of hard economic times, lingering racial tension and, as if that weren't bad enough, derisive comparisons with Salisbury, its bustling neighbor to the south, and tony Easton to the north.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON and CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTERS | August 22, 2006
CAMBRIDGE -- Plans for a billion-dollar golf resort community that has drawn protests from environmentalists won approval yesterday evening from the Cambridge City Council. The 2,700-home Blackwater Resort project - which opponents view as sprawl that would endanger the nearby Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge - now must receive approval from a state commission appointed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that reviews construction within 1,000 feet of Chesapeake Bay tributaries. Supporters hope the construction on top of wetlands and farm fields will bring thousands of new residents - and millions in tax dollars - to a city of about 11,000 that has lost population since the 1960s.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA AND TOM PELTON and JENNIFER SKALKA AND TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTERS | March 25, 2006
The Maryland Senate killed a bill yesterday that sought to limit development near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on the Eastern Shore, handing a victory to advocates of growth and local control. Sen. James Brochin, the Baltimore County Democrat who sponsored the legislation, attributed the defeat to an influx of lobbyists working for the developer who wants to build a $1 billion resort community near the refuge. But even Democratic leaders -- Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden of Baltimore -- voted against the bill, which would have barred construction on about a third of the 1,080-acre site in an environmentally sensitive area along Little Blackwater River.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
If you're going to sell your soul, make sure you get a sweet deal, because you'll never get it back. That's the wisdom the Cambridge City Council should have taken to heart before it voted last week in favor of a billion-dollar resort community proposed for the southern edge of the Dorchester County town. Cambridge is the jewel of the Choptank River, and that pretty river is the matriarch of all Eastern Shore waterways. But the town's once-substantial cachet - Annie Oakley, the Wild West Show sharpshooter, liked Cambridge so much that she retired there - has suffered through decades of hard economic times, lingering racial tension and, as if that weren't bad enough, derisive comparisons with Salisbury, its bustling neighbor to the south, and tony Easton to the north.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 19, 1995
The gold blade of the spinner shimmered as it moved across the submerged end of a blowdown, its revolutions causing vibrations to carry down the rod, a pulse that with each faint beat reinforced the newness of spring.Already the spinner had taken two 7-inch yellow perch from the creek, and the day was as young as the season. Cast. Retrieve. Walk a few yards. Cast. Retrieve. Release. Walk a few steps more. Cast. Retrieve. Release. And so on.Three ducks bathed in a backwater left by heavy rains a week or more ago. Tracks marked the creek banks, where earlier a raccoon had paused at water's edge and then ambled away.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | February 28, 2006
Local officials have told the developer of a proposed resort and conference center near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge to modify his plans, a move that is expected to delay the project for several months. The Cambridge City Council had been scheduled to vote on the final plan for the 3,200-home subdivision last night. But the vote has been put off while the developer, Duane E.E. Zentgraf, prepares a redesign that moves about 180 homes so they are at least 1,000 feet from the Little Blackwater River, said Anne Roane, city planner.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest joined yesterday with those supporting legislation that would limit the size of a 3,200-home golf resort planned near the entrance of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. "We have a juggernaut of developers seeing open space where they can develop houses," said Gilchrest, an Eastern Shore Republican. "Do we sit back passively so we can be consumed by more impervious surfaces and more landfills?" Gilchrest spoke at a hearing in Annapolis on a bill sponsored by state Sen. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, that would prohibit construction in environmentally critical areas within 1,000 feet of rivers flowing into national wildlife refuges.
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