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By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Facing scathing criticism from Democrats questioning the U.S. government's reliance on private security firms in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the chairman of Blackwater USA rejected accusations yesterday that his company employs "cowboys" who do more harm than good. Erik Prince, 38, a former Navy SEAL who started Blackwater about 11 years ago, said during hearings on Capitol Hill that his company has been wrongly painted as a band of mercenaries and has faced "baseless allegations of wrongdoing."
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
On a low-humidity puffy-cloud summer day, 8-year-old Zach Green of Gaithersburg rode a bicycle along the 5-mile Wildlife Drive in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge with his mother, Becky Green, and his grandmother, Andrea Adler, who lives in Bethesda. The three stopped at the first observation site along the drive, propped their bikes on kickstands and began walking up a short boardwalk to the spot where two sets of binoculars were available for searching the marshy grasses and slow-moving Blackwater River.
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NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki demanded yesterday that the U.S. Embassy replace the private security company Blackwater USA after a shootout last weekend reportedly left 11 Iraqis dead. "This crime has inflamed contempt, hatred and anger, both from the government and the Iraqi public. Hence, it is important that this company's activities be frozen and the American Embassy invest in the services of another one," al-Maliki said. "According to the Ministry of Interior, this is the seventh time that this company has been responsible for similar actions."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Trapped in a steel cage barely big enough to hold her, the large squirrel was not happy, pawing at the bars and trying them with her teeth. Matt Whitbeck and Cherry Keller of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were glad to see her, though. The furry gray prisoner, released after being weighed and checked, offered yet another sign that the Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel, once vanishingly rare, has come back. This supersized, reputedly shy member of the squirrel family now is considered fully recovered, according to federal wildlife officials.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | November 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Howard Krongard, the embattled State Department inspector general who is accused of blocking investigations into security contractor Blackwater Worldwide, abruptly recused himself from all Blackwater inquiries yesterday after a congressional panel confronted him with evidence that his brother is serving on a company advisory board. The spreading Blackwater scandal involves allegations that its armed security guards, under contract to the State Department to guard diplomats in Iraq, killed at least 17 Iraqi civilians in Baghdad in September.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 10, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The helicopter was hovering over a Baghdad checkpoint to the Green Zone, one typically crowded with cars, Iraqi civilians and U.S. military personnel. Suddenly, on that May 2005 day, the copter dropped CS gas, a riot-control substance the U.S. military in Iraq can use only under the strictest conditions and with the approval of top military commanders. An armored vehicle on the ground also released the gas, temporarily blinding drivers, passers-by and at least 10 U.S. soldiers operating the checkpoint.
NEWS
By Paul Weinstein Jr. and Marc Dunkelman | October 12, 2007
Capitol Hill is abuzz over allegations of vigilantism and recklessness by U.S. contractors in Iraq. But reports that Blackwater USA has operated outside the law could turn out to be a window into a much larger Bush administration scandal. Largely unnoticed over the last seven years, President Bush has increased the number of contractors working for the federal government at an unprecedented rate. And as the Blackwater debacle shows, the federal government is not equipped or prepared to exercise proper oversight over this vastly expanded, federally empowered work force.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 24, 2007
BAGHDAD -- An Iraqi official conceded yesterday that expelling a private U.S. company accused in the deaths of at least 11 Iraqis would leave a "security vacuum" and said a joint U.S.-Iraqi commission would look at ways to better regulate companies that protect Western personnel and facilities in Iraq. The panel is expected to hold its first meeting within days, the U.S. Embassy said. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki demanded Wednesday that the embassy find a replacement for Blackwater USA and that the company's activities in Iraq be frozen after Blackwater guards protecting a U.S. convoy were involved in a shooting Sept.
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Henry Weinstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 6, 2005
Families of four American men who were murdered and burned by Iraqi insurgents in Fallujah, Iraq, last March sued Blackwater Security Consulting yesterday, accusing the high-profile private security firm of fraud and of putting its employees at unnecessary risk. After the men were killed, the bodies of two were strung up on a bridge over the Euphrates River, and photos were transmitted around the world. The lawsuit, filed in Raleigh, N.C., near where the firm has its headquarters, alleges that the men were not provided with armored vehicles or the weapons they were promised.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Residents will help plan the future of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on Maryland's Eastern Shore as part of a xTC comprehensive conservation plan required under a new federal law.Blackwater, a 17,000-acre haven for migratory waterfowl, is one of the largest and most diversified wildlife refuges on the East Coast. The refuge will be among the first in the nation to tackle the comprehensive plan.In the past, most refuge managers wrote separate plans addressing individual issues, such as hunting or protection of endangered species, rather than an integrated plan.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
The Republican mantra to get rid of regulations just grates my ears. And after Hurricane Sandy, the most recent example of climate chaos, caused incalculable damage, the Republicans are suggesting privatizing search and rescue operations. Anyone who calls for less regulations is heartless and somehow ignores the deaths left in the anti-regulatory wake. The latest travesty are the illnesses and deaths caused by the New England Compounding Center ("Report finds lax pharmacy oversight," Oct. 31)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
First, the bad news: The boy-king Joffrey is still alive.  Now, the good news: That was one amazing episode of television.   Written by George R.R. Martin himself (hallowed be his name) and directed by Neill Marshall, "Blackwater" used the lion's share of "Game of Thrones'" Season 2 budget on a large-scale, epic, fiery battle that showed off special effects and   action   sequences rarely seen on TV. This was television not as mere television, but as a big, blockbuster action movie.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Another 112 acres of wetlands are being added to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge, federal officials announced Wednesday. The Blackwater acquisition for $505,000 is part of more than 6,200 acres of wildlife habitat being preserved at seven refuges nationwide, according to the Department of Interior. The purchases are being paid for with more than $6 million from sales of federal duck hunting stamps. Maryland's Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski hailed the announcement, noting that the refuge is one of Dorchester County's top tourist attractions.
NEWS
Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
Ronald M. Tillier, a retired Ford Motor Co. executive and longtime Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge volunteer, died Sunday. He was 72. Mr. Tillier, who enjoyed competitive clay and skeet shooting, was attending a meet Sunday afternoon in Kennedyville on the Eastern Shore when he was stricken. "He was just preparing to call for targets to be thrown by the trapper when he simply dropped where he was standing," said his wife of 48 years, the former Margaret "Peggy" Clare.
SPORTS
May 1, 2011
Laura Shaver of Manchester writes: I am a "peeking mom" who is fascinated by the Friends of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Eagle Cam that allows people to watch eaglets hatch and grow. It refreshes every 15 seconds, which was great until I saw the Norfolk Botanical Gardens Eagle Cam has live streaming. The Norfolk camera seems to be sponsored by a TV station as well as viewers. Blackwater seems to rely on just us. I have donated and don't mind doing it, but it would be nice if "our" Maryland eagles to look as good as Virginia's.
NEWS
By Capital News Service | November 2, 2009
The Chesapeake Bay is slated to get $50 million in funding, thanks to an appropriations bill that passed the Senate last week and awaits President Barack Obama's signature. In Maryland, the funds will include $1 million for the Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network, which provides support to more than 160 parks, wildlife refuges and museums around the Chesapeake Bay, as well as 22 water trails. The bill also includes $2 million for the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Dorchester County, and $500,000 for the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 18, 2007
BAGHDAD -- American officials scrambled to head off a potential crisis yesterday after irate Iraqi authorities canceled the license of the American security firm Blackwater USA, whose guards were accused of shooting to death eight civilians while guarding a U.S. State Department motorcade. The swift response to Sunday's deaths was Iraq's boldest step to assert itself against foreign security contractors who have long been accused of racing through Baghdad's streets and firing without restraint at anyone they see as a threat.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- State Department investigators offered Blackwater USA security guards immunity during an inquiry into last month's deadly shooting of 17 Iraqis in Baghdad, which could complicate efforts to prosecute the company's employees involved in the episode, government officials said yesterday. The State Department investigators from the agency's investigative arm, the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, offered the immunity grants even though they did not have the authority to do so, the officials said.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | December 6, 2008
5 Blackwater guards indicted in Iraq killings WASHINGTON: Five Blackwater Worldwide security guards have been indicted and a sixth was negotiating a plea with prosecutors for a 2007 shooting that left 17 Iraqis dead and became an anti-U.S. rallying point for insurgents, people close to the case said yesterday. Prosecutors obtained the indictment late Thursday and had it put under seal until it is made public, perhaps by Monday. All who discussed the case did so on condition of anonymity because it remains sealed.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 10, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The helicopter was hovering over a Baghdad checkpoint to the Green Zone, one typically crowded with cars, Iraqi civilians and U.S. military personnel. Suddenly, on that May 2005 day, the copter dropped CS gas, a riot-control substance the U.S. military in Iraq can use only under the strictest conditions and with the approval of top military commanders. An armored vehicle on the ground also released the gas, temporarily blinding drivers, passers-by and at least 10 U.S. soldiers operating the checkpoint.
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