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NEWS
May 12, 2002
The annual Blacksmith Days will be held at the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 19. The highlight of this year's event will be a demonstration by blacksmith Nol Putnam. He will demonstrate and discuss "Designing and Building a Garden Gate" from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, with questions and answers from 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.; and from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, with questions and answers from 4:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Other highlights include an Anvil in Wheelbarrow relay race from noon to 12:30 p.m. and an auction of items forged by area blacksmiths from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., both Saturday.
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EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | June 16, 2012
Master blacksmith Nick Vincent, founder and past president of the Blacksmith Guild of Central Maryland, says he started out modestly 29 years ago — a hammer, an anvil and very little idea of what he was doing. "The first things I ever made I made in my back yard in Reisterstown," said Vincent, who now operates Nathan's Forge, his one-man blacksmithing enterprise, in Uniontown. "I made some hooks, and they were awful," he added with a grin. Vincent has come a long way since then.
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NEWS
May 11, 2003
The Blacksmith Guild of Central Maryland will hold Blacksmith Days from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 18 at the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster. Bob Patrick, 2002 Alex Bealer Award winner, will show how to make an ornate poker and display forge welding. Don Witzler will make a cowboy-head walking stick and other items from round stock. Additional demonstrations by local guild members Dave Morgan and John Larson and others will be featured. Events Saturday will include a family and friends craft ideas exchange and workshop from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., the third annual Anvil in Wheelbarrow Relay Race from noon to 12:30 p.m. and an auction of items forged by area blacksmiths from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday events will include a craft ideas exchange from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., a silent auction of blacksmith work and equipment from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and a smithing contest from noon to 12:30 p.m. Tailgating begins at 8 a.m. both days, with sales of tools, books and blacksmith equipment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Marshall E. Price, a Caroline County blacksmith, met his fate at the end of a rope wielded by a lynch mob on July 2, 1895, for the murder of a 13-year-old girl, Sallie E. Dean, whom he accosted as she made her way to school. Earlier this month, with a friend, Joe Coale, I went to the Eastern Shore to spend a perfectly wonderful sun-splashed autumn day with former Gov. Harry R. Hughes, who lives in Denton. After talking for a while in the den of his home, Hughes suggested a tour of some of the county's historic sites.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 2000
SEVERNA PARK'S blacksmith shop, in Kinder Farm Park, stands beneath the branches of a spreading tree much like Longfellow's village smithy of old. But in Kinder park, the tree is not a chestnut but a historic black oak - one so imposing at 90 feet high and nearly 16 feet in circumference that it has been recognized by the Maryland Big Tree Program as the ninth largest of its species in Maryland. Inside the shop, Terry Steel pursues the career he began almost 30 years ago when he left a technical job in satellite imaging to take up the hands-on profession of blacksmithing.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 1996
LINEBORO blacksmith Michael Kaiser is one of the Carroll County artists and craftsmen scheduled to show their work this weekend at the Hanover Area Arts Guild's Crafts Extravaganza III in Hanover, Pa.Joining him from Carroll will be Sharon Schaeffer, a basket-weaver, and Carolyn Seabolt, a batik, wood and clay artist. Both are of Westminster.On Sunday, Kaiser will offer conversation and a display from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the opening of the crafts show, which includes works by more than 20 crafts people from southern Pennsylvania and Carroll County.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
If you happen to find blacksmith Mike Kaiser tomorrow at the Carroll County Farm Museum, don't expect to stand there and quietly watch him forge S-shaped hooks.The pony-tailed and bespectacled Mr. Kaiser expects more from his audience.Yesterday, for example, the accountant-turned-blacksmith told groups of visiting school youngsters, "This is not MTV. Don't just stand there and let me entertain you. Ask questions. Learn something."Mr. Kaiser and other blacksmiths -- from Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Delaware -- will be demonstrating their trades and competing against one another during "Blacksmith Day" at the Farm Museum from noon to 5 p.m.Visitors can watch blacksmiths working at portable forges set up on the museum grounds.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | September 27, 1993
Pounding iron takes more than a lot of muscle.Albin Drzewianowski knows firsthand that molding iron, or blacksmithing, is based on skill.Mr. Drzewianowski, a Westminster resident who has been blacksmithing since 1988, said, "Muscle is the least important aspect of blacksmithing. It's the skill and knowledge of how and where to hit the metal and the temperature of the forge. These are the critical factors."Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mr. Drzewianowski and some 40 other blacksmiths will share their talent with the public during the fifth annual Blacksmith Day at the Carroll County Farm Museum.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
'Twas under a spreading chestnut tree that the village smithy stood, the poet Longfellow said, and the mighty blacksmith wielded his hammers with arms as strong as iron bands.But no more, said Peter Wilkinson. The physical antithesis of the legendary village blacksmith, the 32-year-old transplanted Englishman produces the same artistry in iron and steel using the education, technique and modern equipment that he said has replaced sheer muscle power.Mr. Wilkinson learned his trade in a five-year apprenticeship -- studying college-level mechanical engineering, metallurgy and practical metal fabrication.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Larry Carson | May 20, 2005
Pimlico Race Course blacksmith Greg Wheeler, 25, has been kicked by more horses than he can count. "Most people around here have," says the third-generation farrier. His busy season is now, when he shoes about eight racehorses a day. His work this week included fitting shoes for Experts Only, a 5-year-old mare that is scheduled to run at Pimlico today. "Everyone wants the horse to have good shoes for the race," says Wheeler, a Sykesville resident. Almost like fashionistas, racehorses require new shoes every 30 days.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
With the weather leapfrogging fall's cheerful chill to winter's blustery bite, the warmest person at the Howard County Conservancy's fall festival Saturday was iron man Allen Dyer. The light from a brilliant fire illuminated the Ellicott City blacksmith, who pumped a huge bellows that fed the dancing flames. Then he spun a thin metal bar in his hands as he heated it until it glowed red. A rapt audience watched Dyer as he transformed the iron into a curved workshop tool, hammering, heating and hammering again until, satisfied, he dipped it into a bucket of water.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2010
Rudi Bethke Sr., a retired master blacksmith who produced parts not found in a catalog, died of cancer Feb. 1 at the Virtua Garden State Hospital in Marlton, N.J. The former Gardenville resident was 69. During his 22 years making snowplow parts and water meter-reading devices for Baltimore City agencies, Mr. Bethke was the go-to man when a metal component broke. Newspaper articles said he could make almost anything, although the one task he did not perform was shoeing a horse. "An imposing, broad-shouldered man," said a 2004 Baltimore Sun article, he "saunters through the city garage like John Wayne in a cowboy movie."
NEWS
October 5, 2008
As the seat of Harford County government, Bel Air had no significant industry in the 1800s. It did support stores and services for residents and local workers. Many blacksmiths operated in the town, including Philip G. Hunter. He was born in 1833 and lived in Bel Air at the time of the 1860 Census. After moving to Havre de Grace and Halls Cross Roads, he returned to Bel Air and worked shoeing horses and as a blacksmith. In 1900 he moved to North Eutaw Street in Baltimore. He died in a city hospital Oct. 4, 1906.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
Travelers whizzing up and down York Road probably don't realize when they get to Stevenson Lane, they're at the epicenter of Rodgers Forge. Recently, colleague Laura Vozzella reported in her column that The Times of London, in a profile of Olympian Michael Phelps, said that he hailed from "the blue-collar mill town of Towson" - to be more accurate, it's Rodgers Forge. We take our neighborhoods seriously around here. Rodgers Forge has Phelps, and Towson can claim Olympic swimmers Anita Nall (1992)
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | May 13, 2007
After taking some blacksmithing classes about 25 years ago, Nick Vincent began forging iron in his backyard after work. In time, says Vincent, who was working full time at the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., the forging became too much and about 16 years ago he decided that something had to go - either his job of 20 years or blacksmithing. Vincent chose to keep forging and never looked back. "I am my own boss, and I get to create things," the 55-year-old Uniontown man said. "I love working in front of the fire in the summer when it's 107 degrees outside.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
Eight years ago, Christopher Holt came across a dusty old blacksmith shop in Wales. From the moment he entered the shop and heated his first piece of hot steel, he knew it was something he wanted to pursue. He went to work as an apprentice for Welsh blacksmith Ronnie Pipp. He worked with Pipp until 2001 when he heard about a class offered through the Artist-Blacksmith's Association of North America (ABANA), a nonprofit organization that began 30 years ago with 20 blacksmiths and has grown to 5,000 members and more than 50 affiliates.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
With the weather leapfrogging fall's cheerful chill to winter's blustery bite, the warmest person at the Howard County Conservancy's fall festival Saturday was iron man Allen Dyer. The light from a brilliant fire illuminated the Ellicott City blacksmith, who pumped a huge bellows that fed the dancing flames. Then he spun a thin metal bar in his hands as he heated it until it glowed red. A rapt audience watched Dyer as he transformed the iron into a curved workshop tool, hammering, heating and hammering again until, satisfied, he dipped it into a bucket of water.
NEWS
By MARY ELLEN GRAYBILL and MARY ELLEN GRAYBILL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2005
Nestled in a new Cape Cod in White Hall, on Jolly Acres Road, a blacksmith's family starts its day early. David Belt Sr., 47, and his apprenticed son, Brian, 19, go to a truck filled with the equipment of a modern-day farrier - an anvil that will be used to hammer horseshoes to fit horses and an ever-expanding supply of aluminum shoes for racers and heavier shoes for riding horses. They will head to the barns of McDonogh School in Owings Mills, or Tranquillity Farms in Jacksonville, or to other farms in the horse country of Maryland.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 10, 2005
Of the hundreds of people who conduct business at the Bank of America's Light Street financial center every weekday, many may not fully appreciate the wealth all around them. It's not just the money in the vaults. There's a wealth of architectural metalwork and other ornamentation on every surface of the main banking floor. Much of it was created by Samuel Yellin, considered the finest wrought-iron maker in the United States in the late 1920s. He created elaborate iron gates, stair railings, dragon's head figures, even ornate bases for the desks where customers sign their checks.
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