Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlackshear
IN THE NEWS

Blackshear

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 25, 2009
On January 21, 2009, GRADY; devoted husband of Landletter Blackshear. Friends may visit the Family Owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Monday after 8:30 A.M. The family will receive friends on Tuesday at the Franklintown Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, 901 W. Mulberry Street at 11 A.M., followed by funeral service at 11:30 A.M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 25, 2009
On January 21, 2009, GRADY; devoted husband of Landletter Blackshear. Friends may visit the Family Owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Monday after 8:30 A.M. The family will receive friends on Tuesday at the Franklintown Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, 901 W. Mulberry Street at 11 A.M., followed by funeral service at 11:30 A.M.
Advertisement
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2006
Leonard A. Blackshear, a champion of African-American history and culture who founded the Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation, died Friday morning at his home in the Riva Woods section of Annapolis. For almost six years, he had suffered from multiple myeloma, a rare cancer of the bone marrow. Mr. Blackshear was 62. Born in Savannah, Ga., Mr. Blackshear soon moved with his family to Queens, N.Y. After graduating from John Adams High School at age 15, Mr. Blackshear enrolled at Hunter College in Manhattan to study engineering.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
Throwing a party while mourning the host is the challenge faced this weekend by the friends and family of Leonard A. Blackshear, founder of the Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival. Blackshear, who also founded the Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation, died in March at age 62 of cancer. Tonight, the city of Annapolis will dedicate the story wall at the memorial to Kinte and Alex Haley at City Dock, monuments that Blackshear made a reality. The next morning, the 19th festival will open at the Anne Arundel County fairgrounds in Crownsville.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1996
Jeff Blackshear wasn't born to play offensive guard. Born two months premature, he weighed only 3 pounds. He was more horse jockey than football material.Blackshear's mother, Julie, was 5 feet 9 and weighed 275 pounds. Robert, his father, was 6-7 and 350."And out came a runt," said Blackshear.Almost 27 years and more than 300 pounds later, Blackshear -- 6-6 and 323 pounds -- is one of the biggest players on the Baltimore Ravens and in the NFL.He wears a 5XL shirt, has a 46-inch waist and wears a size-15 shoe.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Michael Dresser and Paul Adams and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
Glendening administration officials have told lawmakers that David L. Blackshear was ousted as the top executive of Baltimore-Washington International Airport in part because of allegations that he made comments offensive to women and African-Americans. The administration has declined to publicly discuss the reasons behind Blackshear's forced resignation. But officials have privately offered an explanation to several lawmakers after some criticized the administration for the sudden departure of the well-regarded airport executive.
NEWS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Contributing writer | June 14, 1991
Former county Board of Education member Patsy B. Blackshear has beennamed one of five finalists for the job of Baltimore school superintendent.The city school board search committee deliberated for three hours Monday in a closed-door meeting before deciding on Blackshear and four other candidates for the final list.The committee is charged with finding a replacement for outgoing Superintendent Richard C. Hunter. Hunter's three-year contract expires July 31 and was not renewed by the board at the urging of BaltimoreMayor Kurt L. Schmoke.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | June 14, 1991
When Patsy Baker Blackshear left the Washington school system to become an associate superintendent in Baltimore, she said she was undaunted by the city schools' troubles and excited about working under the "strong leadership" of Dr. Richard C. Hunter."
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Gary Lambrecht and Christian Ewell and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
To compare someone to a professional wrestling character these days might compel that person to violence.But tell Ravens right guard Jeff Blackshear -- all 6 feet 6 and 323 pounds of him -- that he's one-half of "Harlem Heat" and he just shrugs.Blackshear and left guard Orlando Brown earned the nickname -- after the tag team on TNT's "Monday Nitro" -- through their intimidating style of play."That's something that J. J. [defensive tackle James Jones] came up with," Blackshear said. "We're always the ones who smack other people around, we're the ones who start fights."
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
As the Ravens planned strategy for courting a possible future running back in Lawrence Phillips, the team reached agreement in principle yesterday with right guard Jeff Blackshear, who accepted a five-year contract extension worth $18.7 million, including a signing bonus estimated at $6 million.After months of negotiations capped by daylong talks, Ravens vice president of administration Pat Moriarty and Ted Marchibroda Jr., Blackshear's agent, agreed to terms last night.Blackshear, a seven-year veteran, had one year left on his contract.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
This summer, the city of Annapolis will name the walkway along the Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley memorial after Leonard A. Blackshear, the activist who envisioned and helped bring the memorial to downtown Annapolis. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer proposed the tribute, and the city council unanimously approved the resolution last week. The walkway along the story wall - which features inspirational plaques - will bear Blackshear's name. It is a fitting honor, Moyer said. "This is a way of acknowledging a contribution that he made to all of us," she said.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | March 31, 2006
When Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer passes by the Alex Haley statue and memorial wall along Annapolis' waterfront, she thinks of Leonard A. Blackshear. "This is indeed Leonard's walk and Leonard's wall," she said this week of Blackshear, who died of cancer March 24. Haley wrote the best-seller Roots about his ancestor Kunta Kinte, who is believed to have arrived as a slave at Annapolis' City Dock in 1767. For Blackshear, a telecommunications business owner who founded the Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation, roots were a favorite metaphor for making the past seem present and real, here and now. "Roots provide an anchor in a world moving so fast," Blackshear said in an interview last year at a children's genealogy summer camp.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2006
Leonard A. Blackshear, a champion of African-American history and culture who founded the Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation, died Friday morning at his home in the Riva Woods section of Annapolis. For almost six years, he had suffered from multiple myeloma, a rare cancer of the bone marrow. Mr. Blackshear was 62. Born in Savannah, Ga., Mr. Blackshear soon moved with his family to Queens, N.Y. After graduating from John Adams High School at age 15, Mr. Blackshear enrolled at Hunter College in Manhattan to study engineering.
NEWS
April 2, 2005
On March 27, 2005, HATTIE MAEBLACKSHEAR-STERLING devoted mother of Mary E., and Warren S. Leath, Carolyn Washington and the late Dr. Hattie Mae Gaines. Also survived by other loving family and friends. Friends may call at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, 2222 W. North Avenue on Sunday from 2 to 6 P.M. Family Hour Monday 11:30 A. M with funeral to follow at 12 noon at Unity United Methodist Church, Edmondson Avenue and Stricker Street.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
A British organization's planned march through Annapolis - described as an apology across generations for the trans-Atlantic slave trade - was granted a waiver from municipal fees by the Annapolis city council yesterday. The London-based Lifeline Expedition is working with the local Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation Inc. in planning the Annapolis event as the kickoff for its first U.S. tour. As part of its quest to heal scars left by slavery, the group has scheduled the stop in Annapolis for Sept.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
A British organization's planned march through Annapolis -- described as an apology across generations for the trans-Atlantic slave trade -- was granted a waiver from municipal fees by the Annapolis city council yesterday. The London-based Lifeline Expedition is working with the local Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation Inc. in planning the Annapolis event as the kickoff for its first U.S. tour. As part of its quest to heal scars left by slavery, the group has scheduled the stop in Annapolis for Sept.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Mike Preston and Gary Lambrecht and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1998
There is no doubt that left tackle Jonathan Ogden is the most talented player on the Ravens' offensive line. But the consensus in the team's locker room is that right guard Jeff Blackshear deserved Ogden-like recognition among the fans, players and coaches who decided on this year's Pro Bowl team.At 6 feet 6, 323 pounds, Blackshear cuts an imposing figure. He has become known for his no-flash, bruising style of punishing defensive linemen and linebackers. His toughness and consistency may be his biggest assets.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
Leonard A. Blackshear's sixth-floor hospital room could be mistaken for his office. An attache case sits on a shelf. Business folders - one with a yellow adhesive note shouting "FAX" - lie across the bed. A secretary patches business calls to his bedside phone. The unwavering tenacity that helps the 57-year-old businessman fight a debilitating illness, which he declines to discuss, fueled his key role in the 20-year push to build a memorial to Pulitzer Prize-winning "Roots" author Alex Haley on Annapolis City Dock.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Allegations of cronyism at Baltimore-Washington International Airport spread from the executive offices to the airport's fire department yesterday after union firefighters claimed that they are being managed by politically connected friends of Gov. Parris N. Glendening who lack airport emergency experience. Local 1742 of the International Association of Fire Fighters took an overwhelming vote of no confidence in airport public safety administrators, saying they have put public safety at risk by not following proper emergency procedures on several occasions and by placing unqualified people on emergency equipment.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.