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Blacks In Wax

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By Sloane Brown | December 10, 2000
The temperatures may have been dropping outside, but they were rising inside the Great Blacks in Wax Museum as some 200 folks grooved at the "Oldies but Goodies Dance." Many guests brought homemade eats, typifying the cozy and kickin' atmosphere. However, at Bridget Scott's and Theresa Shelton's table, a professionally decorated cake took center stage. "It's my birthday today," Bridget explained, as she surveyed her ready-made b-day party. Among others getting into the swing of things: Liz Byrd, event chair; Phyllis Smith, event co-chair; Carol Jolley, Elma Goodman, Roberta Miller, and Sonia Poteat, event committee members; Jesse Booker Williams, Bernard Jennings and Patricia Tunstall, museum board members; Michelle Bryant, Social Security Administration computer specialist; James Owens, Harlem Park Elementary fourth grade teacher; Nora Ellison, independent financial counselor; Gaines Lansey, Morgan State University procurement officer; Lindsey Marable, Bethlehem Steel industrial engineer; Trina Walton, Fair Chance Inc. secretary; and Michael Brice, Maryland correctional officer.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
A cadre of spiritual giants was inducted Saturday into the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum as the East Baltimore gallery looks to expand in its third decade. About 1,000 people gathered in Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center for a tribute ceremony honoring three pastors and a gospel singer for their roles inspiring the country through faith. "Thank God for blessing them so that they could bless others," Rep. Elijah Cummings told the audience. "I want to thank our honorees for changing the trajectory of so many people's destiny.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 27, 2006
Howard E. Rollins Jr., a Baltimore-born actor whose achievements included a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination for 1981's Ragtime, will be joining the lineup at the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum next week. Rollins' early credits included the soap opera All My Children and a pair of influential TV miniseries: Roots: The Next Generation (playing George Haley, the brother of Roots author Alex Haley) and King, a dramatization of the life of Martin Luther King Jr., in which he played Andrew Young.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
Retired basketball star Chris Webber will help the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum raise funds for a $75 million replacement facility scheduled to open on Baltimore's North Avenue corridor in 2015. The museum announced that Webber, a five-time National Basketball Association All-Star who played from 1993 to 2008, will help launch an initiative next week to raise $4 million for the sports wing of a $7 million gallery of sports, recreation and athletics that will be part of the new museum.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
Elmer P. Martin, president and co-founder of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum in East Baltimore, died last week while traveling in Egypt. Councilwoman Helen L. Holton, a Northwest Baltimore Democrat and a member of the museum's board of trustees, confirmed last night that Martin, 54, died Thursday while traveling with his wife, Joanne M. Martin, the museum's executive director. Holton said she did not know the cause of death. "It is a great loss to this community," Holton said. Holton, who announced Martin's death at last night's City Council meeting, said Martin is "someone who will truly be missed for his contributions to the African-American community."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 3, 2002
TROY BRAILEY, hitching his way from South Carolina to Baltimore in the 1930s, probably had no idea he'd end up in wax. Brailey, through the kindness of strangers willing to pick up a black man headed north, found his way to Baltimore and worked as a shoeshine boy, presser and waiter before moving on to greater things. Those "greater things" are the reason the Great Blacks in Wax Museum unveiled last month its wax figure of Brailey, the legislator and civil rights activist who died in 1994.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
ALL RACES CAN learn about and appreciate the contributions of blacks at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum in Baltimore, America's first such museum.Dedicated to the study and preservation of African-American history, it is an educational and cultural center where scenic displays with life-size and lifelike wax figures offer the visitor a positive presentation of history including the struggles, achievements and contributions of African experiences.Established by college professors Elmer and Joanne Martin in 1983 in a building on Saratoga Street, it was relocated in October 1988 to a renovated building at 1601 E. North Ave. (Phone 563-3404)
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1994
Elmer and Joanne Martin began their mission to keep black history alive by carting around four wax figures in their car. Thirteen years later, 117 figures line two floors of their Great Blacks in Wax Museum in a converted East Baltimore firehouse.While their collection of wax figures has grown, one thing hasn't changed."We live right on the financial edge," Mrs. Martin laments. "An institution can't survive on that level. We can't live in the survival mode and be around 10 years from now."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
Dr. Elmer P. Martin, co-founder and president of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum Inc., died Thursday of an apparent heart attack while on a Nile River boat trip in Egypt. He was 54 and lived in Randallstown. Recalled as an educational visionary who wanted to bring both little- and well-known incidents of black history to life, he founded the museum with $30,000 he had saved to buy a home. The museum opened in 1983 in a storefront on West Saratoga Street. Today, the museum is in several rowhouses and a former fire station in the 1600 block of E. North Ave. and attracts about 275,000 visitors annually.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - Education and outreach programs at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum in East Baltimore got a boost last night when the U.S. Senate, as expected, approved a measure that would pour $5 million into the cultural center's coffers. The House approved this week an identical bill to help expand civil rights and violence-prevention initiatives at the nation's first wax museum honoring African-Americans. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings introduced the National Great Black Americans Commemoration Act of 2003, which would add Justice Department money to state, city and private funds aimed at expanding exhibits, facilities and programs at the Baltimore museum, which drew 220,000 visitors last year.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
The deputy director of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum, where a 20-year-old man was fatally stabbed during a fight at a party Friday night, said he was cutting ties with a local promoter who had described the parties to museum officials as Christian fundraisers. Fliers for the parties, posted on a Web page for Big Les Productions, describe them as events for young adults and "mature" high school students. Many of the posters show young men flashing what appear to be gang signs or raising their middle fingers, and promise a "sexy ladies dance contest."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 22, 2009
The 20-year-old who was fatally stabbed Friday night in East Baltimore was attacked during a fight at a party at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum, records show. Police said the museum, which is in the 1600 block of E. North Ave. and features more than 100 life-size wax figures of prominent black leaders, had been rented out for a "large party" held by a group called the Baltimore Christian Warriors, according to court records and museum staff. A number of fights erupted, and Joshua Hargrove was stabbed as a group of men were escorted out of the facility just before midnight, records show.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 22, 2009
The 20-year-old who was fatally stabbed Friday night in East Baltimore was attacked during a fight at a party at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum, records show. Police said the museum, which is in the 1600 block of E. North Ave. and features more than 100 life-size wax figures of prominent black leaders, had been rented out for a "large party" held by a group called the Baltimore Christian Warriors, according to court records and museum staff. A number of fights erupted, and Joshua Hargrove was stabbed as a group of men were escorted out of the facility just before midnight, records show.
NEWS
August 28, 2008
Grandparents as Parents set to meet Sept. 10 Grandparents As Parents, a support group for grandparents raising their grandchildren, will meet from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 10 at the Bain Center, 5470 Ruth Keeton Way, Columbia. The discussion topic is "Helping Your Child Succeed in School." Free child care is provided; reservations are required. The group offers information on services and financial assistance and an opportunity to meet other grandparents raising children. Information: 410-313-1940.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 10, 2008
Joanne Martin sat across from me yesterday morning at the Great Blacks In Wax Museum. I held my head in my hands, mumbling something no doubt incoherent about what I'd like to do to distributors of rap videos. "I've had people come to this museum from around the world who tell me their only exposure to African-Americans is through rap videos," Martin said. "I had a group of people from London tell me that; I had a group of people from Russia tell me that; I had a group of people from Egypt tell me that."
FEATURES
July 10, 2007
Exhibit Learn about Negro Leagues Go see the history of African-American baseball players from the 1800s to the 1960s in Discover Greatness: An Illustrated History of the Negro Baseball Leagues at the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum, 1601 E. North Ave. Hours today are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Call 410-563-7809 or go to ngbiwm.com. FYI Susan Reimer is on vaca tion. Her column returns July 29.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [DANA KINKER] | July 5, 2007
FAMILY JOHN PAUL JONES DAY Celebrate the father of the American Navy, John Paul Jones, and learn about his contributions during the American Revolution at a wreath-laying ceremony on Saturday at his crypt beneath the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel. Afterward, there will be a flag-raising ceremony accompanied by a musical presentation from the Fife and Drums of Prince William III and cannon demonstrations. There will also be children's activities such as a scavenger hunt, knot-tying and paper hat-making.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Reporter | February 1, 2007
Throughout February, celebrate Black History Month and the rich heritage of African-American culture at an array of events. From African art exhibits and historical theater shows to jazz concerts and hip-hop film showings, a month of educational, thought-provoking and entertaining activities are taking place. Below are some of the area's many Black History Month happenings. Continuing "Super Stars: The Navy's Black Admirals" -- Items and photos on the Navy's black admirals, Feb.
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