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By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
As a former New Left student leader of the 1960s, Michael Lerner remembers when blacks and Jews often fought for the same causes. Now they often seem to be fighting each other.The recent furor over Louis Farrakhan's Nation of Islam, its hate-filled attacks on Jews and black leaders' sometimes ambivalent response to those attacks is only the latest symptom of a gradual deterioration in the black-Jewish relationship.How to reconnect African-Americans and Jewish Americans? Mr. Lerner, who is writing a book on the question with black philosopher Cornel West, comes to the University of Maryland Baltimore County tonight to offer suggestions.
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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
When they meet Wednesday to discuss the arrest of a volunteer patrol member accused of assaulting a teenager, Jewish and black leaders will try to preserve decades of bridge-building that has led to a generally peaceful coexistence of diverse groups in Baltimore's Park Heights neighborhood. Those bonds have been strained by the allegations against a member of the Shomrim community patrol, a group of Orthodox Jews who work closely with police on neighborhood safety. Eliyahu Eliezer Werdesheim, 23, was charged with assault after police said he beat a 15-year-old black youth, whose wrist was broken in the incident.
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By Jonathen R. Cohen and Jonathen R. Cohen,Special to The Sun | February 12, 1995
When sometime in the next century social commentators begin discussing the disappearance of the American Jewish community through assimilation, disunity and lost political influence, Murray Friedman's history of the black-Jewish civil rights alliance may well serve as Exhibit A in the anthropological record."
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By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2010
'Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City,' by Antero Pietila (Ivan R. Dee, 320 pages, $28.95) Builder James W. Rouse is remembered as a visionary because of his shopping malls and new towns, like Columbia - promoted as free of racial discrimination. But Rouse had another, less egalitarian side, according to Antero Pietila, a former Baltimore Sun reporter and editorial writer. That side had shown itself a few years earlier in 1951 when, as vice president of the Northwood Co., Rouse looked the other way as blacks and Jews were excluded from the Northwood community.
NEWS
By Joel McCord l | November 2, 1991
The highly publicized gulf between blacks and Jews in the United States is not nearly as wide as one might think, judging from a study released yesterday by the Marjorie Kovler Institute for Black-Jewish Relations.The three-year-long study, unveiled at the Union of American Hebrew Congregations biennial meeting in the Convention Center downtown, found more than 200 model programs, many involving synagogues and black churches working together on projects in cities and on college campuses throughout the country.
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By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2010
'Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City,' by Antero Pietila (Ivan R. Dee, 320 pages, $28.95) Builder James W. Rouse is remembered as a visionary because of his shopping malls and new towns, like Columbia - promoted as free of racial discrimination. But Rouse had another, less egalitarian side, according to Antero Pietila, a former Baltimore Sun reporter and editorial writer. That side had shown itself a few years earlier in 1951 when, as vice president of the Northwood Co., Rouse looked the other way as blacks and Jews were excluded from the Northwood community.
NEWS
August 28, 1991
Blacks and JewsEditor: I am pained and appalled by the tragic deaths in Brooklyn and the subsequent obstreperous and violent clashes between groups of blacks and Jews. It is most heartening that Mayor David Dinkins has moved with alacrity, directness and power to end the confrontations between blacks and Hasidic Jews and urged black and Jewish leaders and lay persons to restore calm, respect and community pride and unity.It, too, is equally disquieting and a source of dismay, given the historic and long-standing bonds of amity and unity which have historically existed in this nation between blacks and Jews in our common struggle for social justice, human dignity and equality of opportunity for all, to observe the present fractious and divisive conflict in Brooklyn.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 22, 1993
Although it may have seemed like an interesting idea, in practice it turns out to be a mistake to show "Bridges and Boundaries: African Americans and American Jews" in two different places for its Baltimore run.This challenging exhibit tracing the history of cooperation and conflict between two of America's minority populations was organized by the Jewish Museum in New York; it had the services of an African-American curator, Gretchen Sullivan Sorin....
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | November 11, 1992
They sat side by side on the platform of Mount Moriah African Methodist Episcopal Church last night -- a Holocaust survivor and a black veteran who helped liberate Jews from Nazi concentration camps.Said Regina Spiegel, a survivor of several camps: "We are grateful to you, African-Americans willing to fight, and other soldiers, who laid down your lives to crush the tyranny of the Third Reich."Eight Holocaust survivors from the Annapolis area were present at the event, the first such tribute ever organized on this scale, said Don Aronson, co-chairman of the African American-Jewish Coalition of Anne Arundel County, which sponsored the evening.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | March 20, 1994
When Wellesley College professor Tony Martin delivered a lecture at Walbrook High School last week on Jewish involvement in the slave trade, the furor raised by his talk had far more to do with the question of who will assume leadership of the post-civil rights movement than with the search for historical truth.In wake of the uproar surrounding a virulently anti-Semitic speech given last year by former Nation of Islam spokesman Khallid Muhammad, and subsequent calls by Jewish organizations for mainstream black leaders to repudiate ties with Nation of Islam leader Minister Louis Farrakhan, the Martin lecture tapped into primal passions among both blacks and Jews.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 15, 2007
Obviously, someone has put crack in the nation's drinking water. What else can one think after the spasms of bigotry to which Mel Gibson, Isaiah Washington, Tim Hardaway and Michael Richards have treated us over the last nine months? That's a lot of stupid in a short period of time. And then there's radio shock-jock Don Imus, who, as even polar bears must know by now, recently leveled racist and sexist insults against the Rutgers University women's basketball team, most of whom are black.
NEWS
By Jonathen R. Cohen and Jonathen R. Cohen,Special to The Sun | February 12, 1995
When sometime in the next century social commentators begin discussing the disappearance of the American Jewish community through assimilation, disunity and lost political influence, Murray Friedman's history of the black-Jewish civil rights alliance may well serve as Exhibit A in the anthropological record."
NEWS
By Benjamin F. Chavis | July 13, 1994
Chicago -- FIFTY YEARS ago, the civil rights movement battled the concrete ills of legal segregation.We now face that era's legacy, a more insidious and complex form of injustice characterized by drastic disparities between the races.The socioeconomic gap has created an equally alarming chasm of attitudes and perceptions.Almost half of all African-American children live in poverty. Black unemployment is twice that of whites. The infant mortality rate in many black communities is equal to that of many Third World nations.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | June 15, 1994
It is painful to watch. Some 80 black leaders gather in Baltimore to develop new ways to deal with black joblessness, black poverty, black divorce and desertion, black children having babies (many out of wedlock), and a host of other problems faced by black families. But the media focus on the presence of a few Jewish pickets who protest the presence of Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam.This is an overreaction by some Jews and it serves to increase rather than diminish anti-Semitism in black America.
NEWS
By SELWYN R. CUDJOE | March 23, 1994
Wellesley, Massachusetts. -- Black scholars come from a distinguished and exemplary tradition, yet it is necessary to re-emphasize the importance of our responsibility particularly at a time when this tradition is being tested anew.This is especially true when students at Kean College applaud loudly when Khallid Muhammad calls Jews ''blood-suckers of the black nation and the black community;'' when students at Howard University chant in unison against what they perceive as the sins of the Jews; and when Tony Martin of Wellesley College teaches from texts proclaiming ''Jewish involvement in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and African slavery.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | March 20, 1994
When Wellesley College professor Tony Martin delivered a lecture at Walbrook High School last week on Jewish involvement in the slave trade, the furor raised by his talk had far more to do with the question of who will assume leadership of the post-civil rights movement than with the search for historical truth.In wake of the uproar surrounding a virulently anti-Semitic speech given last year by former Nation of Islam spokesman Khallid Muhammad, and subsequent calls by Jewish organizations for mainstream black leaders to repudiate ties with Nation of Islam leader Minister Louis Farrakhan, the Martin lecture tapped into primal passions among both blacks and Jews.
NEWS
By SELWYN R. CUDJOE | March 23, 1994
Wellesley, Massachusetts. -- Black scholars come from a distinguished and exemplary tradition, yet it is necessary to re-emphasize the importance of our responsibility particularly at a time when this tradition is being tested anew.This is especially true when students at Kean College applaud loudly when Khallid Muhammad calls Jews ''blood-suckers of the black nation and the black community;'' when students at Howard University chant in unison against what they perceive as the sins of the Jews; and when Tony Martin of Wellesley College teaches from texts proclaiming ''Jewish involvement in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and African slavery.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | June 15, 1994
It is painful to watch. Some 80 black leaders gather in Baltimore to develop new ways to deal with black joblessness, black poverty, black divorce and desertion, black children having babies (many out of wedlock), and a host of other problems faced by black families. But the media focus on the presence of a few Jewish pickets who protest the presence of Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam.This is an overreaction by some Jews and it serves to increase rather than diminish anti-Semitism in black America.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
Students at Northwestern High School, a nearly all-black school in a heavily Jewish corner of Baltimore, have heard much about tensions between blacks and Jews.But they viewed the matter yesterday from a new angle: They met three teen-agers who are both black and Jewish.The visitors -- Gad Kebede, 19; Batsheva Mekonen, 18, and Nurit Tezazo, 16 -- are Ethiopian-Israelis. Their families conserved their Jewish religion for more than 2,500 years in a remote area of Ethiopia before fleeing in the early 1980s to escape war and famine.
FEATURES
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
As a former New Left student leader of the 1960s, Michael Lerner remembers when blacks and Jews often fought for the same causes. Now they often seem to be fighting each other.The recent furor over Louis Farrakhan's Nation of Islam, its hate-filled attacks on Jews and black leaders' sometimes ambivalent response to those attacks is only the latest symptom of a gradual deterioration in the black-Jewish relationship.How to reconnect African-Americans and Jewish Americans? Mr. Lerner, who is writing a book on the question with black philosopher Cornel West, comes to the University of Maryland Baltimore County tonight to offer suggestions.
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