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By CARL T. ROWAN | October 14, 1993
Washington. -- Normally you'd never read a word in this column about a Friars Club roast in which the egoists of the entertainment world vie to see who can be most vulgar, ethnically offensive or disgusting.But I must comment on the recent roasting of Whoopi Goldberg at which her alleged lover, Ted Danson, showed up in blackface with an array of ''nigger'' jokes and lewd comments about his supposed sex life with Whoopi.What makes this ''roast'' worth national commentary is not that the Friars Club apologized -- for a day. It is not that the black woman Whoopi says she wrote most of the ''nigger'' stuff that Mr. Danson used.
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NEWS
By Michael Cross-Barnet | November 2, 2012
Given the trouble she's gotten into in recent years (think: trying to trademark the word "Hon"), one might presume Cafe Hon owner Denise Whiting would take special care to avoid unforced errors that cast her establishment in a less than flattering light. One might presume so. But one would be wrong. The Sun's Jill Rosen reported this week that Cafe Hon posted on its Facebook page a photo of one of its staff members in blackface for Halloween. That's right: a white person, in blackface, "dressing up" as a black person (in this case, the singer Whitney Houston)
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
After complaints from several people, Cafe Hon removed a picture early Thursday morning of one of its staff members in blackface for Halloween. The Hampden restaurant had posted the photo on its Facebook page. It showed an employee, in blackface, apparently dressed for Halloween as Whitney Houston, singing with a smudge of white powder around the nose. "We humbly apologize for our misjudgement in posting a Halloween picture, we have removed the picture," Cafe Hon said on Facebook early Thursday.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
After complaints from several people, Cafe Hon removed a picture early Thursday morning of one of its staff members in blackface for Halloween. The Hampden restaurant had posted the photo on its Facebook page. It showed an employee, in blackface, apparently dressed for Halloween as Whitney Houston, singing with a smudge of white powder around the nose. "We humbly apologize for our misjudgement in posting a Halloween picture, we have removed the picture," Cafe Hon said on Facebook early Thursday.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | December 5, 2006
Only two weeks after unleashing a racially offensive tirade at a West Hollywood comedy club, actor Michael Richards appeared in blackface at a celebrity roast for Whoopi Goldberg over the weekend, drawing gasps from the audience, according to WJZ-TV, Channel 13, the CBS affiliate in Baltimore. Except that he didn't. WJZ's story, broadcast at least twice yesterday afternoon in breaking-news style by anchor Sally Thorner, was attributed to DatelineHollywood.com. But WJZ's news department was apparently unaware that every story on the Web site satirizes Hollywood.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 15, 1996
Bouncing Bobby Berger greeted me with a hug at the doors of the dinner theater of the Best Western Motel in Baltimore Travel Plaza."Greg, I didn't think you'd make it," Bobby said, obviously happy to see me. He didn't know the half of it. I'd promised him last month that I would attend his retirement performance Mother's Day. That was before I was sent on an assignment abroad. I returned to Baltimore only the previous Monday.So here I was, about to watch Bobby perform his blackface Al Jolson routine for the last time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 12, 2000
About midway through Spike Lee's new movie, "Bamboozled," two African-American performers are shown preparing and applying blackface makeup. Following instructions spoken by an off-screen voice, they do it the old-fashioned way: burning corks in alcohol, crushing the ash, mixing the powder with water to make a slurry shiny as wet tar. The tight shot of the stuff might suggest that a few centuries of American racial history have been magically distilled into...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 9, 2003
In the uncomfortable art of Beverly McIver, the past continually intrudes on the present and makes itself visible literally on the artist's face. McIver is an African-American artist whose tense, expressionistic paintings of herself depict a stereotypical "Mammy" of the minstrel era, a sad-faced clown with exaggerated lips and eyes drawn in crude blackface makeup. Not surprisingly, a lot of people are disturbed by such images, which recall this country's painful racial history in a particularly pointed way. Why would a black artist, of all people, they wonder, deliberately adopt a stereotype that has been so ugly and hurtful?
FEATURES
February 28, 2007
Minstrel shows topic of talk, clips The Midnight Rambles Race Films Series continues at the Creative Alliance at the Patter son, 3134 Eastern Ave. In Black Like You, John Strausbaugh gives a talk and shows film clips of minstrel shows with white performers in blackface. The 7:30 p.m. program is free. Call 410-276-1651 or go to crea tivealliance.org.
NEWS
By Michael Cross-Barnet | November 2, 2012
Given the trouble she's gotten into in recent years (think: trying to trademark the word "Hon"), one might presume Cafe Hon owner Denise Whiting would take special care to avoid unforced errors that cast her establishment in a less than flattering light. One might presume so. But one would be wrong. The Sun's Jill Rosen reported this week that Cafe Hon posted on its Facebook page a photo of one of its staff members in blackface for Halloween. That's right: a white person, in blackface, "dressing up" as a black person (in this case, the singer Whitney Houston)
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 14, 2007
Wait a minute. Wait a minute. You ain't heard nothin' yet." Before it was a cliche, it was a prophecy: Eighty years ago this month, audiences watched - and listened - as a character in a major motion picture spoke to them for the first time. The actor was Al Jolson, and the movie was The Jazz Singer. The effect was revolutionary. Within two years, talking pictures were everywhere, no one was releasing silent films, and three decades of silent-filmmaking was obsolete - tossed on the scrap heap.
FEATURES
February 28, 2007
Minstrel shows topic of talk, clips The Midnight Rambles Race Films Series continues at the Creative Alliance at the Patter son, 3134 Eastern Ave. In Black Like You, John Strausbaugh gives a talk and shows film clips of minstrel shows with white performers in blackface. The 7:30 p.m. program is free. Call 410-276-1651 or go to crea tivealliance.org.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | December 5, 2006
Only two weeks after unleashing a racially offensive tirade at a West Hollywood comedy club, actor Michael Richards appeared in blackface at a celebrity roast for Whoopi Goldberg over the weekend, drawing gasps from the audience, according to WJZ-TV, Channel 13, the CBS affiliate in Baltimore. Except that he didn't. WJZ's story, broadcast at least twice yesterday afternoon in breaking-news style by anchor Sally Thorner, was attributed to DatelineHollywood.com. But WJZ's news department was apparently unaware that every story on the Web site satirizes Hollywood.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,[Sun Pop Music Critic] | November 26, 2006
A HUSKY BLACK MAN DRESSED garishly in drag -- blue wig, frosted lipstick -- raps and fries chicken on what appears to be a makeshift plantation as African-American children dance around him, sucking on chicken bones. The scene is from "Fry That Chicken" by Ms. Peachez, a music video that in the last two months has been downloaded more than 600,000 times on Youtube. The song has also received spins on urban stations. It was preceded by an even bigger hit: DJ Webstar & Young B's "Chicken Noodle Soup," which for months has been a mainstay on black radio and in clubs, the video a favorite on Youtube and MTV. The nonsensical song even spawned a dance -- a shuffling, arm-flapping jig that grinning black kids perform in the video.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2005
NOVEL Dancing in the Dark By Caryl Phillips. Alfred A. Knopf. 224 pages. One of the most famous entertainers to don blackface on the American stage was a black man. He was Bert Williams, a native West Indian who emigrated to the U.S. with his parents as a boy and became half of the vaudeville team Williams and Walker, the first black performers to make it to Broadway. In Dancing in the Dark, Caryl Phillips ventures to imagine the unknown inner life of this enigmatic historical figure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 9, 2003
In the uncomfortable art of Beverly McIver, the past continually intrudes on the present and makes itself visible literally on the artist's face. McIver is an African-American artist whose tense, expressionistic paintings of herself depict a stereotypical "Mammy" of the minstrel era, a sad-faced clown with exaggerated lips and eyes drawn in crude blackface makeup. Not surprisingly, a lot of people are disturbed by such images, which recall this country's painful racial history in a particularly pointed way. Why would a black artist, of all people, they wonder, deliberately adopt a stereotype that has been so ugly and hurtful?
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 22, 1998
From Tuesday through Sunday, a lavish musical about Al Jolson is scheduled to run at the Lyric Opera House in Baltimore. It's a little-known footnote that Jolson, an Orthodox Jew and the son of a rabbi, is an alumnus of the Catholic-run St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys.Jolson (1886-1950) is remembered for his performances in blackface. As Mel Watkins wrote in his landmark 1994 history on black humor, "On the Real Side," when Jolson and other performers - black and white - donned burnt cork, they created a "caricature that for many whites defined black Americans on and off the stage for more than a century."
NEWS
By Mary C. Curtis | November 10, 1998
I DIDN'T know whether to laugh or cry. The day was Halloween. The place was the grocery store. The mood was supposed to be fun. Most employees were dressed for the occasion. One was a clown, another a mad scientist. But the first person customers saw as they walked in could only be one thing.The cashier was in full regalia, the antebellum "Mammy" of all mammies, with head rag, blackface (that extended to the arms and hands) and the largest behind you have ever seen. I'm not sure how many pillows she had stuffed back there, but the effect was altogether grotesque.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 12, 2000
About midway through Spike Lee's new movie, "Bamboozled," two African-American performers are shown preparing and applying blackface makeup. Following instructions spoken by an off-screen voice, they do it the old-fashioned way: burning corks in alcohol, crushing the ash, mixing the powder with water to make a slurry shiny as wet tar. The tight shot of the stuff might suggest that a few centuries of American racial history have been magically distilled into...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 1999
Hearing the words of actor Ossie Davis alone would be enough to justify seeing "I'll Make Me a World: a Century of African-American Arts," starting tonight on PBS."Art was at one time the only voice we had to declare our humanity," says Davis, one of the first voices heard in this six-hour documentary series on the history of black artists in 20th century America."When we were described as barely above cattle, certainly not human, it was our art that we had to show the rest of the world that possibly we were humans.
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