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FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
This is a wine for those who enjoy full-flavored, New World-style red wines. The malbec grape's ancestry may be French but this is a very Argentine wine from the exceptional Catena winery. It's a full-bodied, creamy-textured wine with enormous blackberry fruit and a distinct but pleasant gamy quality and hints of coffee and chocolate. It's fully dry, but there are echoes of the flavor of a good vintage Porto. Wine Find: 2008 Alamos Seleccion Malbec From: Mendoza, Argentina Price: $20 Serve with: Hearty stews, game, beef
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
Just in time for the cold weather comes this lush, textured cashmere blanket of a dry red wine. A masterful blend of syrah, zinfandel and merlot, it hits all the right notes of roundness, complexity and length. It offers full-bodied blackberry fruit seasoned with herbs, black pepper, coffee and chocolate. It's ready to drink but should have up to five years of staying power. At $14, it's an insanely fine value — worth buying by the case. Wine Find: 2008 Apothic Red "Winemakers Blend" From: California Price: $14 Serve with: Hearty roasts, stew, game
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Millennial Media, the Canton-based mobile advertising firm, was reportedly in talks to be acquired by Research in Motion, maker of the BlackBerry, but negotiations stalled over pricing for the Baltimore company. Millennial has said in the past that it is considering a public stock offering as an independent company. The private company ranks as one of the largest mobile ad firms in the nation. Citing anonymous sources, The Wall Street Journal on Thursday reported that Canada-based Research in Motion, or RIM, had been in talks with Millennial in recent months.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2009
The second BlackBerry outage in less than a week disrupted service for millions of users on two continents Tuesday and Wednesday. The company behind the service, Canada's Research in Motion Ltd., blamed a software upgrade for the problem, which it said was confined to North and South America. RIM said BlackBerry users were unable to send or receive e-mails and instant messages but did not lose phone service. Many users also found the Internet inaccessible. RIM said the disruptions began around 1:45 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, worsened around 6:30 p.m. and began to be fixed around 11:30 p.m. Service appeared restored by Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
A friend posted a message on Facebook asking if anyone knew what Skype was, if anyone had Skype and if anyone wanted to help her Skype. "Skype," I responded helpfully, "is an online video phone and one more way for my son to ignore me." Technology, they say, is bringing families closer together, with children cell-phoning, e-mailing and instant messaging their parents to a degree not possible in the days when communication meant a pay phone. However, my family has managed to put me on an electronic ice floe and boot me out to sea. Technology has provided my husband, son and daughter with new ways to tune me out. To begin, everybody has a BlackBerry except me. It is a situation I had better remedy if I want to be included on their ongoing text conversations.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | October 20, 2009
Watch out, BlackBerry. The iPhone is creeping into the workplace - and that's a good thing for BoxTone. The Columbia-based software firm has built a growing business on helping corporations monitor their employees' use of BlackBerry smart phones over the past four years. But the Apple iPhone has been a runaway hit among consumers, who are increasingly using these smart phones on the job - and putting pressure on their corporate information technology departments to support the devices.
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