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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
BEAUFORT, N.C. -- The crew stowed its plunder and raised the Jolly Roger in triumph, and skipper Walter Matheson set the wheel for home. It was a cold, bright day in November aboard the lumbering Pelican III, and a long quest had finally ended.Crew members believed they'd found the flagship of Blackbeard the pirate, the 40-gun Queen Anne's Revenge, buried on a sandbar in 20 feet of water two miles offshore. They'd felt it in their bones almost from the moment a diver emerged from the brown water to shout, "There's cannons down there!"
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By Mike Giuliano | May 31, 2011
It seems fitting that "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" is about the search for the fountain of youth, because the fourth installment in this theme park ride-derived movie series shows signs of growing old. Although Johnny Depp remains sly and swaggering as Captain Jack Sparrow, his audience-wooing attitude isn't quite enough to carry this picture. It's a long movie that's needlessly drawn out as Sparrow and several longtime antagonists vie to find those magic waters.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Royster and Amy L. Royster,COX NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2000
BEAUFORT, N.C. - Timbers from the wreck believed to be Blackbeard's flagship waited 282 years until archaeologists lifted them to the surface recently. Through 20 feet of bottle-green water, divers raised four deteriorated wood planks from the port side of the shipwreck to waiting research vessels. These pieces of wood may resolve critical mysteries surrounding Blackbeard's pirate career, including the origin of his ship, the Queen Anne's Revenge. Although fall is prime excavation season, project director Mark Wilde-Ramsing said damage done to the wreck by Hurricane Floyd made recovering the timbers more urgent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
It doesn't look much like coins, this misshapen hunk of stone-encrusted metal. But peer closer, and the coral-like formation turns out to be several dozen 19th-century half-dollars, clinging together like barnacles on a rock. Sure, it's ugly. That's what spending more than a century at the bottom of the ocean can do to a coin. This numismatic mutation is but one of the many wonders on display as part of "Shipwreck! Pirates & Treasure," a traveling exhibition opening Friday at the Maryland Science Center . Part pirate fantasy, part high-tech odyssey, the exhibit is devoted to treasure, highlighting both the scurvy scalawags who plundered it and the modern adventurers who spend years scouring the ocean floor trying to recover it. The result is a happily schizophrenic exhibit that starts off talking about pirates, Jolly Rogers and unfortunate people walking the plank.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1997
BEAUFORT, N.C. -- Divers here have pulled barnacle-encrusted cannons and pewter dinner plates from the sandy offshore shallows, a bounty wrested from what they say was Blackbeard's pirate ship.To the people of this coastal boating village, the relics might as well be gold.Mayor Hunter Chadwick foresees new motels and restaurants jammed with wide-eyed tourists, eager to see the belongings of the seas' most notorious pirate. They would be whisked here on a four-lane highway connecting this isolated landing with the inland capital of Raleigh.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | May 31, 2011
It seems fitting that "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" is about the search for the fountain of youth, because the fourth installment in this theme park ride-derived movie series shows signs of growing old. Although Johnny Depp remains sly and swaggering as Captain Jack Sparrow, his audience-wooing attitude isn't quite enough to carry this picture. It's a long movie that's needlessly drawn out as Sparrow and several longtime antagonists vie to find those magic waters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
It doesn't look much like coins, this misshapen hunk of stone-encrusted metal. But peer closer, and the coral-like formation turns out to be several dozen 19th-century half-dollars, clinging together like barnacles on a rock. Sure, it's ugly. That's what spending more than a century at the bottom of the ocean can do to a coin. This numismatic mutation is but one of the many wonders on display as part of "Shipwreck! Pirates & Treasure," a traveling exhibition opening Friday at the Maryland Science Center . Part pirate fantasy, part high-tech odyssey, the exhibit is devoted to treasure, highlighting both the scurvy scalawags who plundered it and the modern adventurers who spend years scouring the ocean floor trying to recover it. The result is a happily schizophrenic exhibit that starts off talking about pirates, Jolly Rogers and unfortunate people walking the plank.
NEWS
By Dave Schleck and Dave Schleck,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2003
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Sea currents have tossed around pirate Blackbeard's flagship for nearly 300 years. But now the game is getting treacherous for the sunken Queen Anne's Revenge, according to research conducted by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. The ocean's coy pursuit started in June 1718, when the heavily armed pirate ship ran aground in Beaufort Inlet about a mile off the coast of central North Carolina. The rest of the story is told centuries later by geologists like Jesse McNinch, a VIMS professor who recently returned from a research expedition studying the sandy bottom around the wreck.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
On the water, nasty stuff happens: scrapes, dings and boo-boos. And that's just the boat. For the humans aboard, a first-aid kit is a must. Adventure Medical Kits, long a supplier to adventurers on terra firma, has come up with eight versions to cover anything from day-tripping to deep-blue voyages. The Marine 300 ($49; www.adventuremedicalkits.com) is perfect for the Chesapeake Bay, where medical assistance is about an hour away. The blue bag is smaller than a Stephen King thriller and weighs 1 pound, 14 ounces.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | November 12, 1995
"The Comic Strip Century," edited by Bill Blackbeard and Dale Crain. Kitchen Sink Press. Two volumes. 480 pages. $79.95 On the cover, the Yellow Kid, jug-eared progenitor of all that is loved, loathed and celebrated today as the American comic strip, carries his caption as ever on his nightshirt: "Me Mudder wud drop Ded if she seen dis Golleckshun." And so it proceeds. From the Yellow Kid through Calvin and Hobbes and The Far Side, this compilation presents and pays tribute to a century of the glorious genre of art and journalism from 1895 to date.
NEWS
By Dave Schleck and Dave Schleck,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2003
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Sea currents have tossed around pirate Blackbeard's flagship for nearly 300 years. But now the game is getting treacherous for the sunken Queen Anne's Revenge, according to research conducted by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. The ocean's coy pursuit started in June 1718, when the heavily armed pirate ship ran aground in Beaufort Inlet about a mile off the coast of central North Carolina. The rest of the story is told centuries later by geologists like Jesse McNinch, a VIMS professor who recently returned from a research expedition studying the sandy bottom around the wreck.
NEWS
By Amy L. Royster and Amy L. Royster,COX NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2000
BEAUFORT, N.C. - Timbers from the wreck believed to be Blackbeard's flagship waited 282 years until archaeologists lifted them to the surface recently. Through 20 feet of bottle-green water, divers raised four deteriorated wood planks from the port side of the shipwreck to waiting research vessels. These pieces of wood may resolve critical mysteries surrounding Blackbeard's pirate career, including the origin of his ship, the Queen Anne's Revenge. Although fall is prime excavation season, project director Mark Wilde-Ramsing said damage done to the wreck by Hurricane Floyd made recovering the timbers more urgent.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1997
BEAUFORT, N.C. -- Divers here have pulled barnacle-encrusted cannons and pewter dinner plates from the sandy offshore shallows, a bounty wrested from what they say was Blackbeard's pirate ship.To the people of this coastal boating village, the relics might as well be gold.Mayor Hunter Chadwick foresees new motels and restaurants jammed with wide-eyed tourists, eager to see the belongings of the seas' most notorious pirate. They would be whisked here on a four-lane highway connecting this isolated landing with the inland capital of Raleigh.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
BEAUFORT, N.C. -- The crew stowed its plunder and raised the Jolly Roger in triumph, and skipper Walter Matheson set the wheel for home. It was a cold, bright day in November aboard the lumbering Pelican III, and a long quest had finally ended.Crew members believed they'd found the flagship of Blackbeard the pirate, the 40-gun Queen Anne's Revenge, buried on a sandbar in 20 feet of water two miles offshore. They'd felt it in their bones almost from the moment a diver emerged from the brown water to shout, "There's cannons down there!"
NEWS
May 27, 2005
In Brief Bypass surgery vs. stent Bare-metal stents, used to prop open cleared heart arteries, fail to lengthen survival as much as bypass surgery in patients with multiple diseased blood vessels, according to a study published in yesterday's New England Journal of Medicine Researchers in New York found that patients with more than one clogged cardiac artery were about 25 percent less likely to die when surgeons routed the flow of blood around an...
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 1997
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- The stories of Captain Kidd, John "Calico Jack" Rackam, Blackbeard and other assorted rogues, are highlighted in a new exhibit devoted to the fact and fiction of pirate history, currently on view at the Mariners Museum in Newport News."
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