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By Derrick Jackson | October 19, 2004
MILWAUKEE, Wis. - There were about 100 middle-aged and elderly men and women, mostly African-American, in the auditorium at the Wisconsin Black Historical Society on a recent Sunday. They came to remember their stories of the 1950s, '60s, and '70s for the Voices of Civil Rights tour, a 70-day national effort by the American Association of Retired Persons, the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Library of Congress. Compared with Watts, Newark, and the Boston busing crisis, Milwaukee was a less well known but powerful fulcrum of civil rights activities in the '60s, including a school boycott and a riot.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 24, 1990
THE CONTENT OF OUR CHARACTER: A New Vision of Race in America. By Shelby Steele. St. Martin's. 175 pages. $15.95.AS A BLACK analyst of America's racial scene, Shelby Steele seems somewhat anomalous. He is neither preacher nor politician nor sociologist. He is a middle-aged professor of English who has an appropriately fine gift for powerful prose and an uncommonly sharp bulljive detector tuned in to the empty rhetoric that often passes for sound racial discourse these days.Steele seized his moment of national fame through two cover-story essays in Harper's magazine that quickly were followed by others in Commentary, the American Scholar and the New York Times magazine.
NEWS
December 31, 1990
Alice Brenda Henry Black, a city schools administrator, died Dec. 23 at her home in Northwood after a long illness. She was 50.A native of Baltimore, the former Alice Henry was a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and received her bachelor of science and master's degrees from what was then Morgan State College. She later received her doctorate in urban education from Temple University in Philadelphia.Dr. Black began her career as a science teacher at Calverton Junior High School and Walbrook Senior High School.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | July 23, 1991
Black leaders in Annapolis say they plan an aggressive lobbying effort to ensure that new political boundaries don't dilute black voting strength.As a city advisory panel prepares to hear public testimony tonight on redrawing political boundaries, black representation isexpected to dominate debate.The 13-member redistricting committee, appointed by Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins, has just begun reviewing two possible scenarios for new council districts drawn up by the administration.By year's end, the committee plans to recommend specific boundaries to the City Council, which must approve any changes.
NEWS
By Carol M. Swain | June 4, 1993
THE debate over Lani Guinier's fitness to serve as the Justice Department's civil rights chief rightly centers on her distrust of the democratic process and her failure to acknowledge African-Americans' significant progress under the Voting Rights Act.She favors artificial schemes for increasing the political power of minorities.I disagree. African-Americans, for example, cannot benefit from the continued emphasis on segregating black voters in black-majority districts.When the new House was sworn in last January, the number of black members rose to 38 from 25. They now constitute nearly 9 percent of the House as against 12 percent of blacks in the population.
NEWS
December 27, 1990
Associate Judge Harry A. Cole retires next month from the Court of Appeals, Maryland's highest court. Judge Cole is the only black on the seven-judge court. The black community wants him replaced with a black. So, in fact, should the whole state. Diversity is important on a court that sits, deliberates and decides as a group.We assume Gov. William Donald Schaefer wants to nominate a black to the Court of Appeals. He has a good record in this area. In recent weeks he has named three blacks to the circuit courts in Baltimore City and Prince George's County and another to the Court of Special Appeals, an important intermediate level of the judiciary between the circuit courts and the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 10, 1997
I'VE BEEN black for many years. I've been too black for about six.That's how long I've been a newspaper columnist. Six years in which a succession of editors, a handful of race-phobic white readers and a smattering of fire-breathing black ones have sought to adjust the black content in my writing the way you would the picture on an old television.''Too black,'' they complain, followed moments later by, ''Not black enough.'' And that's just the editors.A Louis FarrakhanThe readers are worse.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 1994
Washington -- Jesse Jackson was looking very much like a has-been as recently as two months ago.After building up hopes, then ducking out of running for mayor of the District of Columbia, his stellar career as a tree-shaker and headline grabber seemed to slide to the brink of oblivion.After two unsuccessful campaigns for president, his campaign for District of Columbia statehood, a stillborn issue that he single-handedly reignited, was going nowhere fast. His opposition to NAFTA left his image almost as battered as Ross Perot's opposition left his. Mr. Jackson was marching tirelessly for various causes, but was anyone listening?
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | September 24, 1991
Washington -- Some observers have said that President Bush chose to nominate Clarence Thomas to a seat on the Supreme Court because he knew that black America would become divided, making confirmation easy.Those divisions have popped up in the confirmation hearings in sometimes ugly, virulent ways, revealing jealousies and class conflicts within black America that transcend the fate of Mr. Bush's black nominee.We have seen Alphonso Jackson, the director of the Dallas Housing Authority, demean the black members of Congress and other critics of Mr. Thomas as sellouts who are ''on corporate boards, fly around in Lear jets and eat at the Jockey Club,'' a prestigious restaurant here.
NEWS
By Bruce A. Jacobs | March 8, 1991
I CREATE advertising, among other things, for a living. I come up with ideas for ad campaigns, and I write commercials, and I translate marketing mumbo jumbo into ideas that sell things. I am also an African-American.I tell you all of this because I recently had an unexpected skirmish. It has to do with the long-standing battle to improve the image of black people in the American media. And it left me wondering which side of the barricade some self-styled black media critics are really on.A client of mine, for whom I recently created a TV commercial, called me on the telephone the other day. She was perplexed and upset.
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