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By Carol M. Swain | June 4, 1993
THE debate over Lani Guinier's fitness to serve as the Justice Department's civil rights chief rightly centers on her distrust of the democratic process and her failure to acknowledge African-Americans' significant progress under the Voting Rights Act.She favors artificial schemes for increasing the political power of minorities.I disagree. African-Americans, for example, cannot benefit from the continued emphasis on segregating black voters in black-majority districts.When the new House was sworn in last January, the number of black members rose to 38 from 25. They now constitute nearly 9 percent of the House as against 12 percent of blacks in the population.
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NEWS
December 27, 1990
Associate Judge Harry A. Cole retires next month from the Court of Appeals, Maryland's highest court. Judge Cole is the only black on the seven-judge court. The black community wants him replaced with a black. So, in fact, should the whole state. Diversity is important on a court that sits, deliberates and decides as a group.We assume Gov. William Donald Schaefer wants to nominate a black to the Court of Appeals. He has a good record in this area. In recent weeks he has named three blacks to the circuit courts in Baltimore City and Prince George's County and another to the Court of Special Appeals, an important intermediate level of the judiciary between the circuit courts and the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 10, 1997
I'VE BEEN black for many years. I've been too black for about six.That's how long I've been a newspaper columnist. Six years in which a succession of editors, a handful of race-phobic white readers and a smattering of fire-breathing black ones have sought to adjust the black content in my writing the way you would the picture on an old television.''Too black,'' they complain, followed moments later by, ''Not black enough.'' And that's just the editors.A Louis FarrakhanThe readers are worse.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 1994
Washington -- Jesse Jackson was looking very much like a has-been as recently as two months ago.After building up hopes, then ducking out of running for mayor of the District of Columbia, his stellar career as a tree-shaker and headline grabber seemed to slide to the brink of oblivion.After two unsuccessful campaigns for president, his campaign for District of Columbia statehood, a stillborn issue that he single-handedly reignited, was going nowhere fast. His opposition to NAFTA left his image almost as battered as Ross Perot's opposition left his. Mr. Jackson was marching tirelessly for various causes, but was anyone listening?
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | September 24, 1991
Washington -- Some observers have said that President Bush chose to nominate Clarence Thomas to a seat on the Supreme Court because he knew that black America would become divided, making confirmation easy.Those divisions have popped up in the confirmation hearings in sometimes ugly, virulent ways, revealing jealousies and class conflicts within black America that transcend the fate of Mr. Bush's black nominee.We have seen Alphonso Jackson, the director of the Dallas Housing Authority, demean the black members of Congress and other critics of Mr. Thomas as sellouts who are ''on corporate boards, fly around in Lear jets and eat at the Jockey Club,'' a prestigious restaurant here.
NEWS
By Bruce A. Jacobs | March 8, 1991
I CREATE advertising, among other things, for a living. I come up with ideas for ad campaigns, and I write commercials, and I translate marketing mumbo jumbo into ideas that sell things. I am also an African-American.I tell you all of this because I recently had an unexpected skirmish. It has to do with the long-standing battle to improve the image of black people in the American media. And it left me wondering which side of the barricade some self-styled black media critics are really on.A client of mine, for whom I recently created a TV commercial, called me on the telephone the other day. She was perplexed and upset.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | October 19, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Prior to the Millions More event in Washington last weekend - led by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan - a group of participants gathered at Howard University. It looked like a meeting of the kook fringe as speaker after speaker engaged in the wildest of conspiracy theories about why blacks who are poor continue to be mired in misery. According to some, Hurricane Katrina was a plot by the Bush administration to eliminate their "black problem." Maybe President Bush didn't create the hurricane, but he was responsible for blowing up the levees so that blacks in New Orleans would drown, thus easing welfare payments and reducing the number of black Democratic voters.
NEWS
By Tony Brown | February 2, 1993
I WAS assaulted on a television show once when I introduced data from a RAND Corporation study showing that 75 percent of black males earn a middle-class income. In fact, all of the panelists on that show -- 13 very prominent black professionals -- were so convinced that blacks are universally victimized that any good news, any statistical fact showing black men are not being exterminated, completely upset the agenda.But the real threat to black men is not extermination. It is the XTC psychological crippling caused by middle-class blacks, who incessantly drum into young black males the lie that they are becoming extinct.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | September 21, 1996
A WHITE FRIEND surprised me during a conversation at lunch a few years back when he casually commented that he had never thought of any African-American woman as attractive. I didn't respond because the remark struck me as ridiculous, if not dishonest.The women we call black come in enough shades, shapes and situations to provide at least one who is pleasing to the eye of any man who still has red blood pumping through his veins. Unless he is a racist. Was my ''friend'' trying to tell me something?
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1994
The hushed crowd stared at the scene unfolding before them in the pulpit of Baker Memorial Chapel at Western Maryland College.Two brothers -- one white, one black -- were reunited after discovering that their mother, a fair-skinned black woman, had given up her darker-skinned son because she was trying to pass for white.As James Felton entered the final scene of his original dramatic monologue, the emotional strain on his face throughout his performance faded away into a smirk."Ooh, yeah, well," stammered Mr. Felton, a junior psychology major.
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