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By CLARENCE PAGE | August 8, 1995
Washington. -- Later this month, New York City Police Officer Peter Del Debbio is scheduled to face criminal charges filed by fellow officer Desmond Robinson in 1994.That was when Mr. Del Debbio, off-duty and on his way home to Long Island, shot Mr. Robinson, who was undercover and in pursuit with his gun drawn of a suspected pickpocket. Forensic accounts suggest that Mr. Del Debbio stood over Mr. Robinson as he lay on a subway platform and shot him at least four times in the back. A fifth slug was lodged in Mr. Robinson's waist pouch.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | May 29, 1991
Residents will see a familiar face at the next Town Council meeting.After a two-year absence, Selby M. Black will rejoin the council,filling the seat vacated when Perry L. Jones Jr. was elected mayor."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 18, 2005
CHICAGO -- Conrad Black, the former press magnate who built Hollinger International Inc. into the world's third-largest publisher of English-language newspapers, was charged yesterday with helping steal $51.8 million from the company. The 61-year-old former chairman and chief executive officer of Hollinger International and three former company executives were accused of wire fraud and mail fraud in an 11-count indictment unsealed in U.S. District Court in Chicago. Prosecutors issued an arrest warrant for Black, who has been a British lord since 2001.
NEWS
June 9, 1991
Because amendments to the Voting Rights Act and court rulings suggest that states that can create new congressional districts with a majority of minority voters should do so, there is pressure in Maryland and elsewhere to search for ways to accomplish it. Here it would be the Fifth District, largely Prince George's County, that would be recontoured to elect a black candidate. In its present boundaries, the Fifth is about 44 percent black.The Maryland Republican Party has produced a redistricting map in which the Fifth would be 56 percent black.
NEWS
By Starita Smith | February 19, 2001
DURING THIS Black History Month, there is much to be done to recapture and reclaim our black heritage. One major undertaking lies right under our feet -- the reclamation and preservation of thousands of African-American cemeteries. I was recently reminded of the need for this work when I went home to Cincinnati. As part of a weekend of racial reconciliation, members of local Unitarian churches placed handsome headstones on the graves of my great-grandparents in a small black cemetery there.
NEWS
By Hugh Pearson | May 27, 1994
FOR YEARS now, the same regrettable scene has played itself out repeatedly all over the country.A young black man is beaten or killed by the police -- usually after having committed a crime -- and a large group of black people march on city hall or police headquarters, demanding justice.Consider Ernest Sayon, who died in police custody on April 29 after he had been arrested at the scene of a drug deal in a public housing project on Staten Island, N.Y.Or the scuffle in January at a Harlem mosque.
NEWS
May 18, 1992
One outgrowth of the Los Angeles riots has been public awareness of tensions that for years have smoldered just below the surface between blacks and Korean merchants. This lesson should not be lost. Baltimore officials ought to be working hard right now to heal the rifts that exist here before they erupt in violence.Both Koreans and blacks see themselves as persecuted minorities. But over the years a wall of misunderstanding has built up, owing to differing cultural and historical experiences.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | October 28, 1994
Nashville, Tennessee. -- Ayoung news executive asked me for my reaction to that ''Bell Curve'' book about the genetic &L inferiority of black people.I laughed. Confused, he said, ''I thought you'd be angry and call it a dangerous book.''''It is useless, damaging and dangerous in these times of deep racial troubles in America,'' I said.I was laughing because I was reminded of the funny ways in which claims of black inferiority have graduated from the crude and comical to elitist pseudo-scientific.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | December 30, 1992
Terrance Stowes set out to design a calendar that would teach people about famous black men and woman who were first in their fields.The result has been a calendar that not only teaches people, especially children, about historic black figures, but also spotlights the achievements of men and women long out of the limelight.Mr. Stowes left out such famous figures as Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, so he could include people like Madame C. J. Walker and Ralph Johnson Bunche."I wanted to put in people who maybe others didn't know that much about," said Mr. Stowes, a staff sergeant who lives at Fort Meade and works in the Pentagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 15, 2005
Please don't make a big deal of it, OK? Danielia Cotton is a black chick from New Jersey: pretty, svelte, the camera loves her. But she isn't trying to be the next Mariah or Beyonce. Armed with her guitar, a take-no-mess attitude and a blues-rich voice, Cotton is an AC/DC-loving rocker determined to make her presence felt in a melanin-challenged arena. Besides, the singer-songwriter-musician isn't the first black woman to rock out - and do it well. Surely, you've heard of a force of nature named Tina Turner.
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