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By CLARENCE PAGE | December 1, 1993
Chicago.--Most of the public debate over whether the delicate question of race should matter in adoptions tends to miss the point. Maybe the real question is not whether whites should be allowed to adopt black babies, but rather, why are so few black parents allowed to adopt?Trans-racial adoptions, usually between white parents and black children, have won praise from some as a valuable, although still rare, way to find homes for adoptable black children.Unfortunately, since 1972 they also have been roundly condemned by the National Association of Black Social Workers as ''cultural genocide.
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NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 6, 1991
Washington.THE CLOSER we get to war with Iraq, the louder black voices ask why any African-American should fight in a Persian Gulf war. In a very thoughtful column in the Washington Post Ron Walters, chairman of the political science department at historically black Howard University, said:''To put it bluntly, the Bush administration is playing race politics in a manner that would continue to deny national resources to blacks, while black lives are disproportionately...
NEWS
By Blaine Taylor | September 14, 1994
IT'S THE TIME of year for the Defenders' Day re-enactment at Fort McHenry, marking the anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore.But during such re-enactments little mention usually is made of the role African Americans played in the War of 1812. Black soldiers fought on both sides.What whites of that era feared most was a black slave uprising in the wake of the British assault.Some members of the British high command were planning just such a dreaded revolt.After taking command of the newly formed North American Station on Apr. 1, 1814, the next day Vice-Admiral Sir Alexander Forrester Inglis Cochrane, 55, issued this proclamation to black slaves in the United States that made white Americans' blood run cold:"This is therefore to give notice that all those who may be disposed to emigrate from the United States, will with their families be received on board His Majesty's ships or vessels of war . . . when they will have their choice of either entering into His Majesty's sea or land forces, or of being sent as FREE settlers to the British possessions in North America or the West Indies, where they will meet with all due encouragement."
NEWS
By Ron Howell | April 24, 1998
PEOPLE don't often acknowledge it, but the Nation of Islam, headed now by mercurial Minister Louis Farrakhan, once published a newspaper -- Muhammad Speaks -- that ran some of the most incisive and timely reports to be found about black people.No less a figure than the brilliant historian C.L.R. James (a Marxist who could not tolerate the Nation's bizarre black supremacist ideas) said in the early 1970s: "I don't understand their ideology, but whoever edits their newspaper is a genius."For tens of thousands of blacks from sea to sea, Muhammad Speaks offered domestic and international news with a militant black perspective that was unique in the country.
FEATURES
By Gregory Lewis and Gregory Lewis,San Francisco Examiner | February 11, 1994
"Your mother is so ugly," said Alonzo "Hamburger" Longhorn on a recent Uptown Comedy Club TV show, "when she moved into her new apartment, the neighbors chipped in to buy her curtains."The lowdown, funky, nasty Dirty Dozens is back in vogue.The dozens is a game of verbal combat, played mostly by black males on street corners. It is designed to teach participants to maintain control and keep cool under adverse circumstances."We played the dozens for recreation, like white folks play Scrabble," H. Rap Brown once said.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 2000
A LONG OVERDUE spotlight is about to be cast on a largely ignored aspect of Annapolis life -- the African-American community in Eastport, which is the subject and title of an exhibit opening Sundayat Mount Zion United Methodist Church at 612 Second St. The exhibit is the result of two years of work by a committee of about 20 members under the direction of Peg Wallace, chairwoman of the Eastport Historical Committee, who likes to make sure everyone gets...
FEATURES
By Karin D. Berry and Karin D. Berry,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
It's black America's dirty little secret: Many African-Americans are prejudiced against each other on the basis of color.Filmmaker Spike Lee explored the problem in his movie "School Daze," and was castigated by many for doing so. Now Kathy Russell, Midge Wilson and Ronald Hall examine the history and implications of this deep-rooted prejudice in "The Color Complex."In the predominantly black neighborhood outside St. Louis where I grew up, we used to recite: "If you're white, you're all right; if you're brown, stick around; if you're black, jump back."
NEWS
By MARTIN C. EVANS | February 16, 1992
They were mostly in their 30s and 40s, old enough to have developed a perspective on life but still young enough to be passionate about it, to dream a different world.They, more than 50 black photographers who worked on documenting black America, milled about in an upstairs exhibition hall at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington one afternoon last week, brought together by the opening of "Songs of My People," an exhibition of the fruits of that documentary effort.Having flown or driven in from as far away as San Jose or as nearby as Upper Marlboro, they greeted each addition to their swelling ranks with collegial admiration and, sometimes, with the uninhibited enthusiasm of those who have shared some inner passage, some transcendent ordeal.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 14, 2001
YOU PROBABLY shouldn't read this column. At least, not if you haven't yet seen the new Denzel Washington movie, Training Day. I'll be giving away a major plot point, so if you want to preserve the element of surprise, turn back now. You see, one spends a good part of the movie trying to figure out whether Mr. Washington's character, an LAPD narcotics detective named Alonzo Harris, is a committed cop or a cop who needs to be committed. Is he, in other words, a good cop whose unorthodox and even illegal methods are necessary to the dirty task at hand, or is he just a swaggering bully whose moral compass slipped down the sewer a long time ago?
NEWS
January 3, 2007
On December 30, 2006, JOSEPH EUGENE BLACK; loving son of Bonita and Thomas Ginn and Raymond and Olga Black; cherished brother of Wayne Black, John Ginn, Wanda Black, Raymond Black, Jr. and Sarah Ginn. A Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue, Saturday 10 A.M. Interment Holy Rosary Cemetery. Friends may call Friday 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M.
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