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By Ron Howell | April 24, 1998
PEOPLE don't often acknowledge it, but the Nation of Islam, headed now by mercurial Minister Louis Farrakhan, once published a newspaper -- Muhammad Speaks -- that ran some of the most incisive and timely reports to be found about black people.No less a figure than the brilliant historian C.L.R. James (a Marxist who could not tolerate the Nation's bizarre black supremacist ideas) said in the early 1970s: "I don't understand their ideology, but whoever edits their newspaper is a genius."For tens of thousands of blacks from sea to sea, Muhammad Speaks offered domestic and international news with a militant black perspective that was unique in the country.
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By Karin D. Berry and Karin D. Berry,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
It's black America's dirty little secret: Many African-Americans are prejudiced against each other on the basis of color.Filmmaker Spike Lee explored the problem in his movie "School Daze," and was castigated by many for doing so. Now Kathy Russell, Midge Wilson and Ronald Hall examine the history and implications of this deep-rooted prejudice in "The Color Complex."In the predominantly black neighborhood outside St. Louis where I grew up, we used to recite: "If you're white, you're all right; if you're brown, stick around; if you're black, jump back."
NEWS
By MARTIN C. EVANS | February 16, 1992
They were mostly in their 30s and 40s, old enough to have developed a perspective on life but still young enough to be passionate about it, to dream a different world.They, more than 50 black photographers who worked on documenting black America, milled about in an upstairs exhibition hall at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington one afternoon last week, brought together by the opening of "Songs of My People," an exhibition of the fruits of that documentary effort.Having flown or driven in from as far away as San Jose or as nearby as Upper Marlboro, they greeted each addition to their swelling ranks with collegial admiration and, sometimes, with the uninhibited enthusiasm of those who have shared some inner passage, some transcendent ordeal.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 14, 2001
YOU PROBABLY shouldn't read this column. At least, not if you haven't yet seen the new Denzel Washington movie, Training Day. I'll be giving away a major plot point, so if you want to preserve the element of surprise, turn back now. You see, one spends a good part of the movie trying to figure out whether Mr. Washington's character, an LAPD narcotics detective named Alonzo Harris, is a committed cop or a cop who needs to be committed. Is he, in other words, a good cop whose unorthodox and even illegal methods are necessary to the dirty task at hand, or is he just a swaggering bully whose moral compass slipped down the sewer a long time ago?
NEWS
May 16, 2006
On May 14, 2006, LEROY WOODLAND BLACK JR, beloved husband of the late Audrey R. Black (nee Neukomm) loving father of Le Roy Woodland Black, III and his wife Kathy and George Neukomm Black and his wife Chris, he is also survived by granddaughter Michelle Audrey Black, a grandson David Matthew Black and his wife Beth and a great granddaughter, Madeline. Friends may call at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck Inc., Funeral Home, 5305 Harford Rd (at Echodale) Tuesday 2 to 5 P.M. where funeral services will be held Wednesday, 10 A.M. Interment Moreland Memorial Park.
NEWS
December 22, 2003
On December 21, 2003 ETHEL BLACK (nee Snoskey), loving wife of the late Graham "Roy" L. Black, devoted mother of Robert LeRoy Black and his wife Judie and James Ronald Black and his wife Margaret Ann, devoted brother of Linton Black, Jeanie Hoshall, Jane Dix, Betty Francis, and Nancy Leonard, cherished grandmother of Eric A., Mitchell Robert, and Jason Ryan Black. Also survived by eight great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends in the Lemmon Funeral Home of Dulaney Valley Inc., 10 W. Padonia Rd.(at York Rd)
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