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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | November 5, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Millions of black workers crippled the South African economy yesterday with a nationwide strike to protest the government's economic policies and their -- impact on the nation's black majority.Hundreds of businesses shut down and major urban areas were virtually deserted as an estimated 3.5 million workers observed the first day of a two-day strike.Fifteen people were killed in clashes between strike supporters and opponents at a gold mine in the conservative town of Welkom in the Orange Free State.
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NEWS
By Oren Levin-Waldman | December 23, 2013
Fast food workers in more than a hundred cities across the country went on strike for a $15 an hour wage earlier this month. They were calling it a strike for a livable wage. Fast food workers epitomize the low-skilled working poor in America, but a $15 an hour wage is not about poverty. Rather it speaks to their desire to become respected members of the middle class. Opponents, particularly those in the fast food industry and other low-wage employers, will naturally trot out the standard economic model that such an increase can only lead to lower employment.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | November 6, 1993
Talks about promotions for blacks and better wages for all workers have stalled between BUILD and downtown hoteliers, and Donald P. Hutchinson, president of the Greater Baltimore Committee, said yesterday that it will be "difficult" to get them started again.If no progress is made in the hotel talks, 2,000 members of BUILD, a church-based activist group, are expected to protest downtown Nov. 21 during the group's annual convention."Quite frankly, it's difficult at this point," Mr. Hutchinson said after meeting with 20 ministers from BUILD and allied groups for an hour yesterday.
NEWS
By Seth Rockman | April 5, 2007
Last week's raid on a Baltimore employment agency and the conviction of a local restaurateur remind us that undocumented workers cook our meals, stitch our T-shirts and perform invisible but indispensable labor throughout the city. The recent crackdown is noteworthy for targeting the employers, but immigrant laborers ultimately bear the highest costs when the law is enforced. In this regard, the long history of "illegal" labor in Baltimore offers a different context to consider the 69 workers arrested last week.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1996
A lawyer representing 10 black Giant Food Inc. current and former employees yesterday said she will file a $285 million class action lawsuit against the grocery chain for "pervasive, systemic and institutionalized" racial discrimination.The attorney, Jo Ann Myles of Greenbelt, said the Landover-based chain understated the extent of racist behavior last week when it announced that five current employees and two former employees would sue Giant for "isolated" and "repugnant" racist behavior at two warehouses.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
After working 30 years at Social Security's complex in Woodlawn, Gilbert Jefferson was fed up. Jefferson had been turned down for dozens of promotions by 1991, and was increasingly frustrated as he saw better jobs awarded to white males with less seniority and fewer qualifications. So when a white male was given the management analyst position that Jefferson had sought, he began setting up meetings with other black workers at Social Security to discuss suing over discrimination. At one of the first meetings, 37 black colleagues offered to put their accounts of discrimination into writing, he said.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - At first, I thought Mexican President Vicente Fox was trying for some sort of laugh line when he asserted that his country's migrant workers in the United States do work that "not even blacks want to do." I wondered what jobs those might be. Shining shoes? Cleaning homes? Washing dishes? Tending the garden? Raising other people's kids? How about picking cotton? No-suh, boss. Black workers are like other workers. There's hardly any job that we won't do, if you'll pay us a decent wage.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | August 24, 1993
Unemployment in Maryland, which reached a nine-year high last year, hit black and male workers harder than other groups, the U.S. Department of Labor reported yesterday.In an analysis of the state's 1992 job market, the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that while Maryland's unemployment rate rose three-quarters of a percentage point to 6.6 percent, women saw no increase in joblessness.The unemployment rate for women remained at 5.9 percent in 1992.At the same time, the unemployment rate for blacks jumped nearly 1 1/2 points to 11.2 percent.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
After working 30 years at Social Security's complex in Woodlawn, Gilbert Jefferson was fed up. Jefferson had been turned down for dozens of promotions by 1991, and was increasingly frustrated as he saw better jobs awarded to white males with less seniority and fewer qualifications. So when a white male was given the management analyst position that Jefferson had sought, he began setting up meetings with other black workers at Social Security to discuss suing for discrimination. At one of the first meetings, 37 black colleagues offered to put their accounts of discrimination into writing, he said.
NEWS
By Seth Rockman | April 5, 2007
Last week's raid on a Baltimore employment agency and the conviction of a local restaurateur remind us that undocumented workers cook our meals, stitch our T-shirts and perform invisible but indispensable labor throughout the city. The recent crackdown is noteworthy for targeting the employers, but immigrant laborers ultimately bear the highest costs when the law is enforced. In this regard, the long history of "illegal" labor in Baltimore offers a different context to consider the 69 workers arrested last week.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - At first, I thought Mexican President Vicente Fox was trying for some sort of laugh line when he asserted that his country's migrant workers in the United States do work that "not even blacks want to do." I wondered what jobs those might be. Shining shoes? Cleaning homes? Washing dishes? Tending the garden? Raising other people's kids? How about picking cotton? No-suh, boss. Black workers are like other workers. There's hardly any job that we won't do, if you'll pay us a decent wage.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
After working 30 years at Social Security's complex in Woodlawn, Gilbert Jefferson was fed up. Jefferson had been turned down for dozens of promotions by 1991, and was increasingly frustrated as he saw better jobs awarded to white males with less seniority and fewer qualifications. So when a white male was given the management analyst position that Jefferson had sought, he began setting up meetings with other black workers at Social Security to discuss suing for discrimination. At one of the first meetings, 37 black colleagues offered to put their accounts of discrimination into writing, he said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
After working 30 years at Social Security's complex in Woodlawn, Gilbert Jefferson was fed up. Jefferson had been turned down for dozens of promotions by 1991, and was increasingly frustrated as he saw better jobs awarded to white males with less seniority and fewer qualifications. So when a white male was given the management analyst position that Jefferson had sought, he began setting up meetings with other black workers at Social Security to discuss suing over discrimination. At one of the first meetings, 37 black colleagues offered to put their accounts of discrimination into writing, he said.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Social Security Administration has settled a lawsuit involving 2,200 black male employees who had accused the agency of discriminating against them in promotions and pay because of their race and sex. Attorneys for the employees, who worked at the agency's Woodlawn headquarters between 1995 and this year, said the group settled the class action for a "significant" amount of money - in the millions - and for changes in SSA policies on...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 6, 2002
Warmth and good cheer filled the Forum ballroom. So did some 300 members and guests of the Association of Black Media Workers -- the Baltimore affiliate chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists -- gathered for the group's "2001 Annual Kwanzaa Celebration." The evening began with the traditional Kwanzaa libation ceremony, honoring several local community leaders for representing the different principles of Kwanzaa. One of the most heartfelt moments came when Joanne Martin accepted the plaque for Kugichagulia (self-determination)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 7, 2001
Tables in the ballroom at the Forum dazzled with kente cloth centerpieces, napkins of red, green and black gaily sprouting from water glasses, and brightly decorated cards describing the seven Kwanzaa principles fanned out at each place setting. After all, this was the 2000 Kwanzaa Event and 25th Anniversary Celebration for the Association of Black Media Workers. The holiday spirit flourished as 350 festively dressed guests arrived for the evening's Kwanzaa libation ceremony, dinner and dancing.
NEWS
By LEN SHINDEL | February 17, 1992
Francis Brown, 61, has worked at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point Plant for 36 years. He was one of the leaders of Steel and Shipyard Workers for Equality, which formed in the early 1960s. Later, he was an elected official of the steelworkers' union Local 2610. He is now collecting documents of the black steelworkers' struggle to be placed in the archives of Morgan State University's Soper Library.Mr. Brown bitterly remembers applying for work at Bethlehem's employment office in 1956. ''I went to a trade school.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Office of Personnel Management, National Security Agency's Equal Employment Office. Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
The National Security Agency, the nation's largest and most secretive spy organization, has a secret of its own: one of the most dismal records in the federal government for hiring and promotion of minorities.Black workers at NSA say they are routinely bypassed for promotions. And the agency's own statistics show that only 2.45 percent of those at the highest pay grades are African-Americans, while the figure is 4.8 percent for the government as a whole.In a memo distributed to employees last month, a top NSA official readily acknowledged the agency "lags behind" the rest of the federal government in hiring minorities.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1999
A group of former and current employees has charged a prestigious Anne Arundel County organization that provides work and job training for disabled adults with discriminating against its black workers.Helped by the Anne Arundel chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, seven blacks filed suit against the Providence Center in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday, with hopes of turning it into a class-action suit that could affect more than 100 employees of the Arnold-based agency.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 23, 1998
WELLINGTON, South Africa -- On a sun-drenched slope in the hills that produce this country's finest wines, where white landowners have grown rich while their black workers have remained poor, the grapes of reconciliation are now being grown.A white farmer has given his black workers 25 acres of prime land, worth $500,000. And the new owners have named their vineyard -- the first ever owned by South African blacks -- "Klein Begin" (Afrikaans for "Small Beginning")."It's an opportunity to gain something out of life," says Solly Skippers, one of the 16 black partners in the new vineyard.
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