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Black Velvet

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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 2008
We asked painter Tony Shore, whose gritty new images of gang violence and street crime are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, whether he'd been watching too much TV lately - specifically, The Wire, HBO's police drama about gang violence and street crime in Baltimore. Not at all, Shore replied. Over the past few months he's been far too busy making his signature acrylic-on-black-velvet paintings to watch TV. Still, since winning the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts' $25,000 Sondheim Artscape Prize last summer, Shore has taken his painting in an unexpected direction.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 26, 2009
Jeremy Guthrie got a package delivered to him in the clubhouse and was very proud of the contents: a pair of fancy blazers - one in black velvet. Frankly, I thought only Prince wore velvet blazers, but maybe I'm just out of touch. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 26, 2009
Jeremy Guthrie got a package delivered to him in the clubhouse and was very proud of the contents: a pair of fancy blazers - one in black velvet. Frankly, I thought only Prince wore velvet blazers, but maybe I'm just out of touch. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 2008
We asked painter Tony Shore, whose gritty new images of gang violence and street crime are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, whether he'd been watching too much TV lately - specifically, The Wire, HBO's police drama about gang violence and street crime in Baltimore. Not at all, Shore replied. Over the past few months he's been far too busy making his signature acrylic-on-black-velvet paintings to watch TV. Still, since winning the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts' $25,000 Sondheim Artscape Prize last summer, Shore has taken his painting in an unexpected direction.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | December 22, 1996
This holiday season's answer to party dresses are party pants. They have the advantage of eliminating the hemline issue altogether. They are also almost universally flattering because they give the illusion of a long, lean line. All the top designers have them, but the evening pants idea has trickled down to all price points. Here are some ideas and inspirations from the runways.Universal velvetThe new evening basic -- black velvet trousers -- can be the foundation for many looks. Josie Natori, the diva of lingerie design, showed them with a lace bustier.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | April 8, 1993
Fall means serious investment dressing -- coats, career suits and evening clothes. Shopping and thinking ahead will keep you flush and in step with the fashion pack.Give clearance rack remainders a last look. Heavier knits that look too dark and moody now will be just the ticket this autumn. Think accessories as you cruise resort flea markets and antique shops. Think before you banish anything from your closet. Think black.* Jet was what glittered at the designer collections, but it is far less pricey at the vintage and collectibles shops.
FEATURES
By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times News Service | July 29, 1993
PARIS -- Now it's official. The miniskirt emerged as the fashion of the hour in the fall shows of the couture houses here.Gianni Versace started to unwrap the leg on opening day. Karl Lagerfeld used the micro-miniskirt as the partner of the new Chanel jacket. Yves Saint Laurent threw his scissors on the side of short clothes. In doing so, he reinstated his position as a leader of fashion, not a follower. His clothes, which had been on the conservative side for some time, developed a fresh new spin.
FEATURES
By Francine Parnes and Francine Parnes,Contributing Writer | November 25, 1993
If you're bent on slipping into something comfortable for the holidays, consider a bodysuit with a long wrap skirt or evening pants."A bodysuit stays down, and it doesn't ride up, gap or wrinkle," says Patti Cohen, a vice president at Donna Karan. "That's the main reason for it. You put it on along with your stockings, and you're almost dressed.""It's the modern blouse of the '90s," designer Josie Natori says.Panne or smooth velvet, sheers, glittery knits and embroidered lace are the top holiday looks, according to Karen Bromley, speaking for the Intimate Apparel Council.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | November 20, 1991
Coats, like everything else in fashion, have been caught up in the craze for changing fabrics, categories and uses.BTC Once satin, velvet, lace and lame were strictly for evening, but now clothes made of or trimmed in any of these voluptuous fabrics are considered appropriate for day as well as night. Some of these fragile materials have also been treated to wear well in all weather.At the Paris fashion showings last month, several editors were spotted wearing a boxy topper of black velvet with quilted satin sleeves that reversed to a quilted satin lining.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | November 14, 1993
Today's black-tie dressing appears to be about everything but the tie.That bit of silk at the neck has lost its importance, and the focus now is on accessories that have been reinvented or borrowed from the ladies. The possibilities for originality are endless for the creatively fashionable male, but may present problems for the man who does formal wear by the old formulas.The idea is to relax, enjoy the less restrictive social climate and put some fun into dress for festive occasions. A little thought makes sense, too.* Resist looks that make you uncomfortable.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 14, 2007
A Baltimore artist whose portraits of family and friends painted on black velvet capture the poignant and gritty flavor of working class life in the city was named the winner yesterday of this year's Janet and Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. Tony Shore, 35, accepted the $25,000 award from Mayor Sheila Dixon amid tears of joy and gratitude before a crowd of several hundred assembled at the Baltimore Museum of Art, where the work of the finalists is on display. The award is named after the longtime Baltimore civic leader and his wife.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | March 1, 2006
For more than a decade, Baltimore native Tony Shore has made members of his large, extended family in the city's Pigtown neighborhood the subjects of his signature realistic paintings on black velvet, a material he associates with his working-class origins and the tastes it inspired in his youth. His most recent paintings, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, are an extension of earlier work in which the artist rendered his family members in domestic settings -- watching TV, doing housework, sitting on the steps outside their homes -- with remarkable sensitivity both to their personal dignity and to the artistic possibilities of the oil on black velvet medium, which in his hands allows colors to float out of the inky background like luminous bubbles of illusionary space.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
Leaping lizards! Velvet is back for men this fall. No, not lounge-lizard wear, but beautiful silk- and cotton-based velvet blazers in colors like black, chocolate brown and garnet. "Velvet blazers are being tipped as one of the season's hottest items for men -- for fashion-conscious men, that is," says David Wolfe of the Doneger Group, which forecasts fashion trends. In New York, velvet blazers are selling like crazy, in spite of the warm weather. Stephen Cardino, men's fashion director for Macy's East, says most of the store's stock is being bought at this point by 16- to 24-year-olds who wear them clubbing.
FEATURES
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
When a bloodied Hasim "Rock" Rahman threw the big right hand that won him the heavyweight title Saturday, he did it in style, wearing black velvet HOBOs with red satin trim. Just like 20-1 underdog Rahman, HOBO, the Washington-based urban fashion line that opened a boutique in Baltimore a year ago, was largely obscure before last weekend. But both were suddenly famous in the fifth round, when Rahman knocked out defending champ Lennox Lewis while wearing trunks with the rhinestone logo - which stands for Helping Our Brothas Out. Since then, photos of Baltimore's overnight boxing sensation and the label he endorses have been splashed across the world.
FEATURES
By Karen Klages and Karen Klages,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 9, 1997
Velvet has lost its reputation as being only for special occasions.Count the world of fashion in on the make-over.Last fall, Donna Karan featured classic column dresses in a not-so-classic velvet. "Burnout velvet" is how Karan's people refer to the process. It looked like acid had been thrown on the dresses, eating away big chunks of the velvet pile in some key spots. What remained was a jolting, sexy combination of sheer-and-velvet.The fun is not stopping with the coming of spring.The venerable house of Gucci is showing tie-dye velvet dresses with whip snake boots.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | December 22, 1996
This holiday season's answer to party dresses are party pants. They have the advantage of eliminating the hemline issue altogether. They are also almost universally flattering because they give the illusion of a long, lean line. All the top designers have them, but the evening pants idea has trickled down to all price points. Here are some ideas and inspirations from the runways.Universal velvetThe new evening basic -- black velvet trousers -- can be the foundation for many looks. Josie Natori, the diva of lingerie design, showed them with a lace bustier.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 11, 1994
In Baltimore, at least in some circles, it's a high compliment to be compared to Raoul Middleman, especially if you're a 22-year-old artist having your first important show and Middleman was one of your instructors at the Maryland Institute. I'm guessing Tony Shore appreciated that I noticed Middleman's style -- like it was so hard -- throughout Shore's "Bawlmer Portraits" (acrylic on black velvet) at Gallery M, 1000 Hollins St. And just as soon as I made the comparison, Shore was pointing the way to a portrait of Middleman hanging in the rear of the gallery.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | March 1, 2006
For more than a decade, Baltimore native Tony Shore has made members of his large, extended family in the city's Pigtown neighborhood the subjects of his signature realistic paintings on black velvet, a material he associates with his working-class origins and the tastes it inspired in his youth. His most recent paintings, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, are an extension of earlier work in which the artist rendered his family members in domestic settings -- watching TV, doing housework, sitting on the steps outside their homes -- with remarkable sensitivity both to their personal dignity and to the artistic possibilities of the oil on black velvet medium, which in his hands allows colors to float out of the inky background like luminous bubbles of illusionary space.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 11, 1994
In Baltimore, at least in some circles, it's a high compliment to be compared to Raoul Middleman, especially if you're a 22-year-old artist having your first important show and Middleman was one of your instructors at the Maryland Institute. I'm guessing Tony Shore appreciated that I noticed Middleman's style -- like it was so hard -- throughout Shore's "Bawlmer Portraits" (acrylic on black velvet) at Gallery M, 1000 Hollins St. And just as soon as I made the comparison, Shore was pointing the way to a portrait of Middleman hanging in the rear of the gallery.
FEATURES
By Francine Parnes and Francine Parnes,Contributing Writer | November 25, 1993
If you're bent on slipping into something comfortable for the holidays, consider a bodysuit with a long wrap skirt or evening pants."A bodysuit stays down, and it doesn't ride up, gap or wrinkle," says Patti Cohen, a vice president at Donna Karan. "That's the main reason for it. You put it on along with your stockings, and you're almost dressed.""It's the modern blouse of the '90s," designer Josie Natori says.Panne or smooth velvet, sheers, glittery knits and embroidered lace are the top holiday looks, according to Karen Bromley, speaking for the Intimate Apparel Council.
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