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By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., fired three months ago as NAACP executive director, re-emerged on the Baltimore scene last night with a plea for black unity at a State of the Race conference.But Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam, failed to appear as scheduled for a "town hall meeting" at the 5th Regiment Armory.Ron Daniels, organizer of the conference, told the crowd of about 1,000 that Minister Farrakhan was in Baltimore but that unspecified "security concerns" had prevented him from appearing.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella | January 20, 2007
A local attorney is urging Baltimore's black mayoral hopefuls to get behind one black candidate or risk returning a white mayor to City Hall. In a letter sent yesterday to Mayor Sheila Dixon and several rivals, Warren A. Brown warned that a large field of black candidates would split the black vote. "Surely all of you must recognize that with five Blacks pursuing this office, a member of the `majority' community will certainly, once again, serve as Mayor of this City," Brown wrote. In addition to Dixon, Brown sent the letter to six people who plan to challenge her in September's Democratic primary, or are rumored to be considering runs.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | January 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The failure of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan to denounce inflammatory remarks made by an aide is complicating recent attempts by some African-American leaders to forge a pact of unity with the Nation of Islam.The virulently anti-Semitic speech made last November by Farrakhan aide Khalid Abdul Muhammad, in which he is quoted as calling Jews "the blood suckers of the black nation," has been attacked by a growing number of black leaders, including the Rev. Jesse Jackson, who called on Mr. Farrakhan to repudiate the comments, NAACP chief Benjamin Chavis and congressional Black Caucus Chairman Kweisi Mfume.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Minister Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam was in Baltimore last night, preaching unity among all African-Americans and promoting the Million Family March scheduled for Oct. 16 in Washington. The date marks the fifth anniversary of Farrakhan's Million Man March. Speaking at the Bread of Life Cathedral at Franklin and Cathedral streets, the Muslim leader invited black families of all backgrounds - from Christians to black nationalists to members of the Elks Club - to attend. He also said he would like to see at least 10,000 African-American couples take marriage vows at the march and noted that because the event will be three weeks before the presidential election, it was a golden opportunity to promote a black agenda in Washington.
NEWS
By Salim Muwakkil | August 29, 1994
THE NAACP looked at its future and it flinched. The group's recently ousted executive director, the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., represented the next step in African-Americans' freedom march, despite all his alleged faults. The 46-year-old Dr. Chavis may yet fulfill that leading role, and leave the nation's oldest civil rights organization behind.An overwhelming number of board members voted to dismiss the controversial Dr. Chavis. Their primary pretext was Dr. Chavis' commitment of $332,400 of the organization's money to settle a sexual discrimination complaint, but the fundamental motive was ideological.
NEWS
By DENTON L. WATSON | June 21, 1994
Freeport, New York.--Forty years after it led the struggle for the landmark Brown v. Board of Education school-desegregation decision and 30 years after it won passage of the most far-reaching civil-rights act since Reconstruction, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is mired in chaos over strategy.The bitter debate centers on the determination of the Rev. Benjamin Chavis, NAACP executive director, to reject the strategy that was essential for those victories in the courts and Congress and, instead, create alliances in the name of black unity.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers | February 10, 1994
THE NATIONAL Association for the Advancement of Colored People has done a grave disservice to African Americans by pretending Louis Farrakhan is not a hater and a bigot.In firing an aide last week for making "mean-spirited" anti-Semitic remarks -- but at the same time defending the "truth" of those remarks -- Mr. Farrakhan stayed true to his usual tactics of paranoid rhetoric and double talk.This is the Louis Farrakhan who frightens white America, the quintessential demagogue who operates by the old adage that "two wrongs don't make a right -- but it damn sure makes it even."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 2, 1996
Donte Young and Lori McDaniel went to Volcano's the night of Oct. 23 probably to listen to music, meet new people and take a much needed break from their college studies. Having fun was on their minds.In the wee hours of Oct. 24 both had been shot dead, by someone who had come to Volcano's with homicide on his mind. (We can safely assume that assailant was black. No one has reported seeing a white guy firing those shots that brought an end to two promising lives. If he had been, Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson would be holding press conferences and protests on Baltimore's streets even as you read this.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella | January 20, 2007
A local attorney is urging Baltimore's black mayoral hopefuls to get behind one black candidate or risk returning a white mayor to City Hall. In a letter sent yesterday to Mayor Sheila Dixon and several rivals, Warren A. Brown warned that a large field of black candidates would split the black vote. "Surely all of you must recognize that with five Blacks pursuing this office, a member of the `majority' community will certainly, once again, serve as Mayor of this City," Brown wrote. In addition to Dixon, Brown sent the letter to six people who plan to challenge her in September's Democratic primary, or are rumored to be considering runs.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Minister Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam was in Baltimore last night, preaching unity among all African-Americans and promoting the Million Family March scheduled for Oct. 16 in Washington. The date marks the fifth anniversary of Farrakhan's Million Man March. Speaking at the Bread of Life Cathedral at Franklin and Cathedral streets, the Muslim leader invited black families of all backgrounds - from Christians to black nationalists to members of the Elks Club - to attend. He also said he would like to see at least 10,000 African-American couples take marriage vows at the march and noted that because the event will be three weeks before the presidential election, it was a golden opportunity to promote a black agenda in Washington.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 2, 1996
Donte Young and Lori McDaniel went to Volcano's the night of Oct. 23 probably to listen to music, meet new people and take a much needed break from their college studies. Having fun was on their minds.In the wee hours of Oct. 24 both had been shot dead, by someone who had come to Volcano's with homicide on his mind. (We can safely assume that assailant was black. No one has reported seeing a white guy firing those shots that brought an end to two promising lives. If he had been, Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson would be holding press conferences and protests on Baltimore's streets even as you read this.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., fired three months ago as NAACP executive director, re-emerged on the Baltimore scene last night with a plea for black unity at a State of the Race conference.But Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam, failed to appear as scheduled for a "town hall meeting" at the 5th Regiment Armory.Ron Daniels, organizer of the conference, told the crowd of about 1,000 that Minister Farrakhan was in Baltimore but that unspecified "security concerns" had prevented him from appearing.
NEWS
By Salim Muwakkil | August 29, 1994
THE NAACP looked at its future and it flinched. The group's recently ousted executive director, the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., represented the next step in African-Americans' freedom march, despite all his alleged faults. The 46-year-old Dr. Chavis may yet fulfill that leading role, and leave the nation's oldest civil rights organization behind.An overwhelming number of board members voted to dismiss the controversial Dr. Chavis. Their primary pretext was Dr. Chavis' commitment of $332,400 of the organization's money to settle a sexual discrimination complaint, but the fundamental motive was ideological.
NEWS
By DENTON L. WATSON | June 21, 1994
Freeport, New York.--Forty years after it led the struggle for the landmark Brown v. Board of Education school-desegregation decision and 30 years after it won passage of the most far-reaching civil-rights act since Reconstruction, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is mired in chaos over strategy.The bitter debate centers on the determination of the Rev. Benjamin Chavis, NAACP executive director, to reject the strategy that was essential for those victories in the courts and Congress and, instead, create alliances in the name of black unity.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers | February 10, 1994
THE NATIONAL Association for the Advancement of Colored People has done a grave disservice to African Americans by pretending Louis Farrakhan is not a hater and a bigot.In firing an aide last week for making "mean-spirited" anti-Semitic remarks -- but at the same time defending the "truth" of those remarks -- Mr. Farrakhan stayed true to his usual tactics of paranoid rhetoric and double talk.This is the Louis Farrakhan who frightens white America, the quintessential demagogue who operates by the old adage that "two wrongs don't make a right -- but it damn sure makes it even."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | January 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The failure of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan to denounce inflammatory remarks made by an aide is complicating recent attempts by some African-American leaders to forge a pact of unity with the Nation of Islam.The virulently anti-Semitic speech made last November by Farrakhan aide Khalid Abdul Muhammad, in which he is quoted as calling Jews "the blood suckers of the black nation," has been attacked by a growing number of black leaders, including the Rev. Jesse Jackson, who called on Mr. Farrakhan to repudiate the comments, NAACP chief Benjamin Chavis and congressional Black Caucus Chairman Kweisi Mfume.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
More than 400 members of Baltimore's black and Korean communities joined yesterday to "sing a new song" of peace and unity at the church where Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke worships."
NEWS
June 13, 1994
3 of a kindI believe the June 6 Other Voices piece written by Barry Steel entitled, "Clinton's unprincipled opposition to war," should have been expanded to say, "Oh, and also Phil Gramm's and Dan Quayle's."Cindy McKennaBaltimoreAmprey letterAs one of the recipients of the May 26 letter from Baltimore School Superintendent Walter Amprey, I would like to comment on the emotional impact the letter had on me.My reactions were fear, then anger.My tenure as a school psychologist in elementary and middle schools has convinced me that unless we stop the downward spiral in urban education, our city will become a giant homeless shelter, refuge for a tribe of illiterate,hopeless people.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
More than 400 members of Baltimore's black and Korean communities joined yesterday to "sing a new song" of peace and unity at the church where Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke worships."
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