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By Lois Fenton | May 16, 1991
Q I am in the film business. And while I am no actor or producer, I average probably a black-tie affair a week. I don't have the money of a producer, either. But "black tie" is business dress for me. So I'd like to have a little more variety without buying three more tuxedos. Any suggestions?A: Stay with the classics for your evening suit; leave the variations for your accessories.One of the first changes in "proper" black-tie dressing was the introduction of flattering wing collar shirts (more correctly worn with tailcoats for white-tie dressing)
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By Rachel Gatulis and For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
I just came from celebrating the marriage of two of Andrew's good friends this past weekend. We had the best time, surrounded by great friends. The ceremony was tasteful and simple. The reception was at a prestigious (read: very fancy) country club and was absolutely beautiful. The invitation said "black tie. " To reiterate: the men were asked to wear their jackets if they left the reception room for any reason, so as to not offend the other members at the club. However, I was in the minority wearing a long dress.
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By Lois Fenton | December 13, 1990
Q I have a nice pocket watch that was given to me at my retirement. How is this watch worn?A: When vested suits were in vogue, the pocket watch commonly dangled across a man's chest (occasionally perilously close to his belly) in a position of prominence.Today, when vests are not worn on traditional suits, the watch is carried in the watch pocket (a tiny slitlike opening just below the waistband of the trousers), or if the suit does not have one, in either side pocket of the trousers. The chain then drops in a small U-shape and attaches discreetly to the nearest belt loop (between the pocket and the belt buckle)
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By James C. Morant | March 22, 2012
What, exactly, made 17-year-old Trayvon Martin "suspicious" in the eyes of the man who shot him to death? The question makes me think back to the time before my mom passed away, when she was hospitalized in a highly respected hospital here in Baltimore. On one Sunday, after church, I went to visit her. Security at this hospital was in full action that day. Each visitor, apparently, had to sign in to declare what person and room they intended to visit. I was dressed in a black suit, white shirt, black tie, black socks and black dress shoes.
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By Lois Fenton | January 5, 1992
Few occasions in a man's life are so full of questions as his wedding day. "What do I wear?" is high on the list. While other questions may have multiple answers, protocol plays the major role on this day. The bridegroom's attire is quite specifically prescribed.The type of clothes he will wear is determined by the formality of the wedding and the time of day. Traditionally, weddings are either daytime formal, evening formal, daytime informal or evening informal.For a daytime formal wedding, the bridegroom wears a cutaway coat of dark, oxford gray wool (sometimes referred to as a morning coat)
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By Lois Fenton | January 10, 1991
Q: I recently attended an evening champagne-tasting event. Since we would be drinking fine champagne from France, I wore a dark suit, white shirt and tie. Others came in everything from black tie, to suits, blue blazers and even jeans. Jeans seemed to be an insult to our hosts. What's the right attire for such an occasion?A: Clothes should be appropriate to the event and tied to the time of day. Since champagne is considered to be the most festive of drinks, jeans were probably inappropriate.
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By Vida Roberts | November 14, 1993
Monkey suit, a manly, slangy reference to black tie, is definitely a misnomer. Put any man in a monkey suit and he suddenly stands taller, sounds more intelligent and exudes handsome homo sapien charm and wit.Black-tie dressing does all that, which is why the traditional basic black dinner jacket, white shirt and black tie combination has gone virtually unchanged in this century. Once men got on to a good thing they were not about to tamper with it. Why, in some Baltimore families, Papa's tux is passed on to junior, and with judicious use of mothballs, pressing and alterations, goes the social rounds with yet another generation.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 2, 1994
Black tie or blue jeans, sports events or concerts, there's something for every taste and pocketbook coming up on our social calendar. There are so many events planned over the next six months that we decided to run three months today. April, May, June events will be listed in March.JANUARY:9: 10th annual Fillmore Frolic, Sheraton Baltimore North inTowson, 2 p.m.-4 p.m., speaker Alan Walden, WBAL-radio. Voluntary contributions benefit the Women's Housing Coalition's literacy program. Call (410)
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By Vida Roberts | November 14, 1993
Today's black-tie dressing appears to be about everything but the tie.That bit of silk at the neck has lost its importance, and the focus now is on accessories that have been reinvented or borrowed from the ladies. The possibilities for originality are endless for the creatively fashionable male, but may present problems for the man who does formal wear by the old formulas.The idea is to relax, enjoy the less restrictive social climate and put some fun into dress for festive occasions. A little thought makes sense, too.* Resist looks that make you uncomfortable.
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By Rachel Gatulis and For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
I just came from celebrating the marriage of two of Andrew's good friends this past weekend. We had the best time, surrounded by great friends. The ceremony was tasteful and simple. The reception was at a prestigious (read: very fancy) country club and was absolutely beautiful. The invitation said "black tie. " To reiterate: the men were asked to wear their jackets if they left the reception room for any reason, so as to not offend the other members at the club. However, I was in the minority wearing a long dress.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Days after Sheila Dixon made history by becoming the first woman elected mayor in Baltimore, she made it clear that she knows how to do more than win - she knows how to party. Dixon, who won Tuesday's general election with 88 percent of the vote, unveiled a six-day schedule of events to mark her inauguration, including stops along the way to promote city workers, families and senior citizens. After her swearing-in at Morgan State University on Dec. 4, Dixon will host a black-tie ball at the Baltimore Convention Center - the headline event - emceed by Susan Taylor of Essence magazine and featuring live musicians.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - Donning tuxedos and evening gowns, Maryland Republicans flocked to Washington last night for an inaugural gala in the shadow of the White House that raised $400,000 for the resurgent state party. State GOP Chairman John M. Kane said the event was among the most profitable fund-raisers for party operations, capitalizing on tomorrow's inauguration of President Bush and the close ties of several Marylanders to the White House. Doro Bush Koch, sister of the president and a Montgomery County resident, was an honorary guest, thanking Marylanders for their work on her brother's campaign.
NEWS
By Paul McMullen and Sun Staff | June 11, 2004
Wasn't this a marketing can't-miss? Michael Phelps has endorsement deals with more than a half-dozen companies. Two, Visa and Argent Mortgage, are also linked to thoroughbred racing's Triple Crown. Its middle stop is in Baltimore, where organizers of the Preakness Parade asked the local boy made very good to be this year's grand marshal. Why didn't Phelps take that limo ride down Eutaw Street? The thanks, but no thanks from Team Phelps -- which consists of the swimmer and a core of advisers that includes his agent, his coach and his mother -- points to how Phelps has juggled the demands of sponsors who have made the 18-year-old from Rodgers Forge rich, the international media that want to tell his story and the training that made him a sensation in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2004
Hooray! April 1. We can finally believe that spring is really here. Feel like celebrating? Well, the spring party rush is about to begin, and chances are your favorite nonprofit is throwing some sort of fund-raiser. Whatever your description of fun is, you probably can find it at one party, at least, over the next three months. Consider these categories and examples: In the cultural black-tie arena, one springtime tradition continues at the Walters Art Museum, as its Women's Committee presents its 15th Annual Art Blooms April 16-18.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2004
Creative teen-agers are getting more time in the spotlight this year, thanks to a new program designed to celebrate high school theater. Organizers believe a local branch of the Cappies program, in which students review student theatrical productions and vote on awards for outstanding performances (on stage and off), will encourage young writers, motivate actors, singers and stage crew members, and add excitement to the amateur theater experience. "If it's not talked about, it doesn't seem like it's valued," said Carol Lehan, director of the Baltimore Cappies.
BUSINESS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Special to SunSpot | December 15, 2003
Poinsettias deck the lobby. A holiday-themed sweater adorns the receptionist. And you've just been invited to your company's annual shindig. 'Tis the season. Though the recent gains in the economy have not led many companies to stop pinching pennies, most Baltimore-area firms plan to spend a little something on holiday cheer for their employees this season. Whether it's full-blown affairs with champagne and tuxedos or sedate lunches out with the team, the local 9-to-5 world will find a way this month to punctuate the season -- even if it might not be as elaborate as in Christmases past.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | December 18, 1992
I knew it would happen to Bill Clinton; I just didn't know it would happen this soon.In his acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention, Clinton reminded us of his humble roots in Hope, Ark., a town of 10,000 where the biggest event was -- and still is -- the watermelon festival, where there is a contest to see who can spit the seeds the farthest."
FEATURES
By Lois Fenton | November 1, 1990
QI've noticed in the Midwest and in the South that relatives who are not part of the wedding party sometimes wear black tie. When I attended a family wedding recently, I left my tux at home. Would it have been OK to wear it?A: You can wear a black-tie evening suit for such occasions without appearing to be overdoing it. Nevertheless, most men are a bit cautious about seeming to be "too dressed." That's why, at a dressy wedding, it would not be wrong for any male guest to dress in black tie.As attested to by any James Bond fan, men look fantastic in black tie. They also look marvelous in "white-tie-and-tails," the ultimate in formal wear; but a man who wears such a "full dress" get-up when it is not called for looks ridiculous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2002
The month of March may - as the saying goes - come in like a lion, and go out like a lamb. However - if we're talking parties - this April resembles an animal more along the lines of the Tasmanian Devil.You know, that whirling-dervish cartoon character? The spring party season comes on like gangbusters this month, and it stays strong through June, as many charities throw their annual fund-raisers. So many parties to choose from. So little time! April 6 The Magic of Life Gala: Benefits LifeBridge Health pediatric programs.
NEWS
By Joy Green and Joy Green,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
Some civic groups raise money each year by throwing a lavish ball, complete with live music and formal attire. The Phantom Ball is nothing like that. The annual bash sponsored by the Baltimore Reads literacy organization - a fund-raiser that has brought in more than $500,000 in the past nine years - invites donors to purchase tickets and even tables for an imaginary event. They can contribute to a worthy cause, but avoid the obligation of attending a black-tie affair. "People like the idea that they do not need to get dressed up and attend a traditional gala event," said Jim R. Williams, a former event chairman and co-creator of the ball.
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