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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 26, 2002
Q. There was something on the news about how tea drinkers are less likely to have heart attacks. Does it matter if it is regular or decaffeinated tea? What about hot tea compared with iced tea? And is herb or green tea as good as black tea in this regard? A. Harvard researchers report in the current edition of the journal Circulation that tea seems to have heart-healthy properties. Almost 2,000 heart-attack patients were questioned about their tea-drinking habits and were followed for roughly four years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | May 28, 2013
When I went to Thailand two years ago, I developed an obsession for the way the culture makes - make that "takes" (as is tradition) - their iced tea. We pseudo Southerners scoop loads of sugar into ours. But Thailanders make theirs as if it were coffee - by adding milk. The result is a beautiful, layered, orange beverage that's creamy, bitter and sweet all at the same time. Better than a milk shake any day, in my opinion. So I was beyond excited to see the Long Thailand Tea listed among the specialty cocktails at My Thai's new location in Little Italy.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 9, 2005
LONDON - For centuries, Britain has been characterized by its abysmally dank weather, its oddly refreshing warm beer, its dysfunctional royal families and, perhaps above all, its almost fanatical love for a steaming hot mug of strong black tea. The weather here still stinks, the beer is still unchilled and Britain's royal family remains energetically unbalanced. The role of traditional black tea in Britain, though, apparently is weakening. Sharing the headlines here with stories about the Iraq war, North Korean nukes and the disintegration of the European Union has been the news that sales of traditional British teabags fell by 16 percent over the past two years, while loose tea sales dropped 9 percent.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
Messr. Editors -- The following verses are extracted from the Philadelphia Public Ledger of Monday last. As they describe my case so well, I will thank you to publish them once more. For the last five or six years I have been most horribly afflicted with Dyspepsia and Liver Complaint. They very best of physicians have done all they could for me, and I have tried many other remedies, but all to no purpose, and finally concluded that I would take no more medicine of any kinds. My friends, however, advised me as a last resort, to try the much talked of Brandreth Pills.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | September 22, 2002
Q. I read the article about using catnip as a mosquito repellent. Will merely planting catnip around the house ward off mosquitoes? Or is it necessary to crush the leaves, releasing the plants' oils? Given the situation with West Nile virus, it would be wonderful if using catnip as a foliage planting could create a safer zone around our homes. A. The ingredient in catnip that appears to have mosquito-repellent properties is nepetalactone. To activate the compound you have to crush the leaves and release the volatile oil. Just planting catnip around your house is unlikely to afford any protection from mosquitoes.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 25, 2004
You recently wrote about a link between black cohosh and liver problems. I have a friend who has had hepatitis C for 23 years. She had been taking black cohosh for menopausal hot flashes, but her liver enzymes were high. When I read your column I e-mailed her, and she quit taking the herb. Today she phoned to tell me her liver enzymes are now down significantly. She credits quitting the black cohosh for this dramatic improvement. We both thank you. We are delighted to learn that your friend had such a positive outcome.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | September 15, 1991
It is all preliminary -- much of the scientific work has been done on animals in other countries -- but there is some evidence that drinking tea may help stave off cancer and lower cholesterol.Research from one study presented at the International Tea Symposium in New York earlier this year indicates that zTC consumption of Chinese green tea inhibits esophageal cancer in rats. Another paper shows that the main constituent of Japanese green tea (epigallocatechin gallate, or EGCG) seems to prevent cancerous skin tumors in mice and apparently has lowered the incidence of gastric cancer in some Japanese people who consume it in large quantities.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | July 7, 2002
Q. I am a tea drinker -- green, black and herbals. I grew up putting milk in my black tea, but I drink iced tea and herbals unadulterated. I overheard a conversation in which someone said putting milk in tea destroys the healthful benefits of the phytochemicals. Is this a fact? If it does have some effect, does it completely negate all the benefits of the black tea? A. Don't worry about the milk in your black tea. According to Jeffrey Blumberg, chief of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at Tufts University, milk doesn't interfere substantially with those beneficial plant chemicals.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 28, 1999
Q. I read in your column about a nondrug treatment for toenail fungus. Could you please send me the home remedy since I now have fungus myself? The prescription my doctor offered is way too expensive.A. Over the years we have collected lots of remedies for nail fungus. This infection can make nails thick, rough, yellowish-brown and crumbly. Our favorite approach is a vinegar soak -- 1 part vinegar to 2 parts warm water.Q. I took Zocor for high cholesterol and stopped because it caused me to have seizures.
FEATURES
By Garret Condon and Garret Condon,THE HARTFORD COURANT | February 6, 1996
Tea, with about 40 milligrams of caffeine per brewed cup, has half the buzz of java. But unlike coffee, tea might have some definite health benefits. In animal research and in epidemiological studies, tea seems to protect against cancer and heart disease -- and it might also fight tooth decay.Zhi Y. Wang, a research scientist at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, is one of the world's leading tea investigators. He says lab studies on animals show that tea prevents the formation of cancerous tumors on a number of body sites.
HEALTH
By Elaine Pelc, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Elaine Pelc weighs in on teas. There are many health claims surrounding tea. Some have stronger supporting evidence than others. Tea can be broken down into five types: white, green, black, oolong and herbal. The first four are all created from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis bush and are categorized based on their levels of oxidation, which means a change in chemical structure when exposed to oxygen.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | March 12, 2008
Wintry sunlight seeps into the storefront window, brightening the entryway and glinting off dozens of metallic canisters that, displayed behind the bar, hold dreamy-named versions of the elixir that is Teavolve's raison d'etre. Mandarin green. Lapsang souchong. Lemon mango. Rooibos paradise. Golden Jasmine. Sonari assam. Sundew. Deeper into the room, people sit across from one another absorbed in conversation, hands wrapped around warm mugs. Local art lines the walls and a soothing soundtrack that the owners accurately call "chill lounge" filters through unobtrusively.
NEWS
By ALICE LESCH KELLY AND ROSIE MESTEL and ALICE LESCH KELLY AND ROSIE MESTEL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 2005
Tea, to China's 18th-century Emperor Chien Lung, was more than a whistle-wetting pick-me-up: It was "that precious drink which drives away the five causes of sorrow." Western businesses are banking on our buying into Chien Lung's sentiments. In addition to selling a cornucopia of loose green teas, they have distilled the brew's essence and added it to health bars, supplements, diet aids, gum, soft drinks and skin creams - even, in Asia, to Kit Kat candy bars. Green tea is good for us: That mantra has been chanted in the West since the early 1990s, when studies reported that the infusion, sipped for centuries in China and Japan, appeared to help fight off cancers when drunk by lab mice or rubbed on their skin.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 9, 2005
LONDON - For centuries, Britain has been characterized by its abysmally dank weather, its oddly refreshing warm beer, its dysfunctional royal families and, perhaps above all, its almost fanatical love for a steaming hot mug of strong black tea. The weather here still stinks, the beer is still unchilled and Britain's royal family remains energetically unbalanced. The role of traditional black tea in Britain, though, apparently is weakening. Sharing the headlines here with stories about the Iraq war, North Korean nukes and the disintegration of the European Union has been the news that sales of traditional British teabags fell by 16 percent over the past two years, while loose tea sales dropped 9 percent.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2004
I'm an herbal tea drinker, but recently I saw a TV show that suggested regular tea is better for the body than herbal tea. Is this true? Perhaps. Studies show that black and green teas pack more of an antioxidant punch than herbal teas. With a different chemical makeup than black and green tea, the herbal variety has fewer flavonoids (plant-derived antioxidants). Bottom line? While herbal tea does have the advantage of being caffeine-free, it wouldn't hurt you to also drink regular tea. So, come tomorrow's tea time, try brewing a pot of Darjeeling or Earl Grey.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 29, 2004
My husband had bypass surgery five years ago, and last year he had two stents put in. The heart doctor asked if he was taking vitamin E. We said he'd taken it for years, and the doctor said to stop it immediately. He claims studies show it is bad for the heart. Is this true? We don't know of any evidence that vitamin E is bad for the heart, but most research suggests it is not helpful, either. A study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine (July 26, 2004) analyzed data from seven studies involving more than 100,000 people.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2004
It's a rare person who has never taken comfort in tea. Suffering from a cold? Add honey and lemon and soothe your throat. Feeling blah in bleak midwinter? Add a spoonful of sugar and a splash of milk, and let a cup of tea brighten your spirits. If you think just any warm beverage could play the part, the Tea Council of the U.S.A. has news for you. Researchers are proving what our hearts have always known - tea is good for you. So good, in fact, that you might want to consider it health food.
FEATURES
By Joan Cirillo and Joan Cirillo,Special to The Sun | August 16, 1995
Portland, Ore. -- The Sattwa Chai package advertises its dry, aromatic contents as "The Tea That Stirs The Maker." The founders of Oregon Chai call their liquid tea concentrate, "A cup of wild abandon. A Sip of Consequence." And the blend in coffee peddler Starbucks' Chai Spice box releases a sweet cardamom scent for "an exotic and unusual taste."Welcome to the world of chai, the hottest new beverage in the Pacific Northwest. Pronounced ch-eye, the traditional milky Asian blend of spices and black tea has become the latest latte here in restaurants and coffee bars, markets, health food stores and college hangouts.
NEWS
By Jennifer Rubell and Jennifer Rubell,Tribune Media Services | July 18, 2004
Martha Stewart kept a few bottles of it on the defense table during her federal trial in New York. Ben Affleck drank it during an interview with Playboy. Teen-agers gulp it out of giant bottles with trippy graphics. And ladies-who-lunch sip it out of crystal glasses with a slice of lemon. Yes, we're talking about iced tea, the unofficial drink of summer. Around the country, iced tea is all the rage. According to Joe Simrany, president of the Tea Association of the U.S.A., Americans spent $2 billion on ready-to-drink iced tea last year, 10 times more than we spent in 1990.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 25, 2004
You recently wrote about a link between black cohosh and liver problems. I have a friend who has had hepatitis C for 23 years. She had been taking black cohosh for menopausal hot flashes, but her liver enzymes were high. When I read your column I e-mailed her, and she quit taking the herb. Today she phoned to tell me her liver enzymes are now down significantly. She credits quitting the black cohosh for this dramatic improvement. We both thank you. We are delighted to learn that your friend had such a positive outcome.
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