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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Suspensions and other disciplinary actions for African-American students fell at Anne Arundel County schools last year because of new practices, said a school system team examining purported racial disparities in punishments. The audit, design and planning team was created by schools Superintendent Kevin Maxwell as part of efforts to address concerns about school discipline, particularly among African-American students, who school officials say make up 22 percent of the school district's enrollment but account for a higher percentage of suspensions.
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NEWS
By Chris Soto | August 11, 2014
Every so often, there is reason to cheer a little louder both within the gates of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., and 350 miles down Interstate 95 at the U.S. Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, D.C. This year, the academy had a banner admissions class, enrolling 256 highly qualified, bright-eyed cadets who took their oaths of office under a beautiful New England summer sky on June 30th. The group, not including international cadets, boasts an average GPA of 3.87 and includes 214 varsity letter earners, numerous class presidents and many other talented young people who will lead our great nation into the next generation.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
More African-American students in Maryland's Class of 2012 successfully passed a rigorous Advanced Placement exam than ever before, as the state continued to lead the nation in the percentage of students deemed college- and career-ready, according to data released Wednesday by the national College Board. The 11.4 percent of black students who earned a score of 3 or better on an exam still comprises a small fraction of the 29.6 percent of all Maryland seniors who passed a test. But it is among the highest percentages in the nation, reflecting the increased access and success for black students on the exams.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Baltimore police deployed extra officers around Digital Harbor High School in Federal Hill and a handful of other schools this week to ensure students' safety in the wake of recent threats and violent attacks against Latino students. The beefed-up security presence appears to have calmed a situation that was threatening to get out of hand after all but seven of the Digital Harbor's more than 100 Latino students stayed home last Friday because they feared being attacked by black students on the streets near the school.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | May 11, 2008
Under pressure to reduce the suspension rate of black students, Anne Arundel County is making progress by training staff in how to work with people of different backgrounds and giving troublesome students more support. Experts say such training is a key to keeping African-American students throughout Maryland in school. Last year, 13.9 percent of black children were suspended statewide, compared with 5.8 percent of white kids. Studies have linked suspensions and expulsions to lower academic achievement and higher dropout rates.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
A nurturing atmosphere and dedicated instructors are needed to overcome society's hurdles and boost the academic performance of black students, a teaching expert told more than 200 educators yesterday.Asa Hilliard III, an award-winning educator who spoke to a standing-room-only audience at a conference on educating black students at the Johns Hopkins University, said educators must change goals, structures and attitudes to boost morale of black students."Change these three things and we will see achievement improve," Mr. Hilliard said.
NEWS
By REBECCA TROUNSON and REBECCA TROUNSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- This fall 4,852 freshmen are expected to enroll at the University of California, Los Angeles, but only 96, or 2 percent, are black - the lowest figure in decades and a growing concern on the campus. For several years, students, professors and administrators at UCLA have watched with discouragement as the numbers of black students declined. But the new figures, released last week, have shocked many on campus and prompted school leaders to declare the situation a crisis. UCLA - which has such storied black alumni as baseball legend Jackie Robinson, Nobel laureate Ralph Bunche and former Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, and is in a county that is 9.8 percent black - now has a lower percentage of black freshmen than either its cross-town rival, the University of Southern California, or UC-Berkeley, the school often considered its top competitor within the UC system.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
Parents of students in the county schools' Black Student Achievement Program took educators to task Monday, saying their children feel alienated in the school system and suggesting dozens of ideas for strengthening support for minority students.During the three-hour meeting at the Board of Education building in Ellicott City, parents listed about 50 recommendations for the school system to improve test scores of black students and increase awareness of black history.the recommendations are passed, teachers would view "Eyes on the Prize," principals would hire more black coaches, and administrators would have to track hiring practices of black teachers.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | June 20, 1993
Finally, the Howard County school system has come up with a program that could improve the achievement level of African-American students.For nearly seven years, the Black Student Achievement Program has been the only game in town when it came to addressing the gnawing problem of black students' low test scores. Unfortunately, the BSAP has concentrated most of its efforts on esteem-building programs, giving short shrift to what goes on within Howard classrooms.But a new program, developed by the school system's Human Relations Office, proposes that teachers rethink the way they teach African-American children and use new techniques to boost their academic progress.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | September 27, 1998
ONE OF THE BEST big bands in the country, the Baltimore Jazz Orchestra, gave a concert Wednesday night at the Peabody Institute featuring legendary songstress Ethel Ennis.As striking to me as the superb renditions of numbers written by Gershwin, Ellington and Basie was the composition of the audience -- almost entirely white.Perhaps the setting had a lot to do with that. The Peabody Conservatory isn't generally regarded as a venue for hot music. But African Americans invented jazz, and it was a bit disconcerting to see so few present for a performance by one of the true vocal masters of the musical idiom, Ms. Ennis.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
It was just a moment of poor teenage judgment: One student threw a marker across a classroom at Digital Harbor High, sparking an argument between a Latino student and a black student. Since they couldn't fight in class, they agreed to meet after school on Federal Hill. The fight was a nasty one, and the Latino boy was sent to the hospital with a concussion. Then word spread, and though school leaders believe the incident wasn't about race, it was impressions that mattered last week.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Baltimore police plan to deploy officers around city schools until the school year ends to ensure student safety amid recent racial tensions, while school officials joined civil rights leaders to urge students of different races to peacefully resolve differences. The actions followed recent threats and violent attacks on Latino students as well as the Memorial Day robbery and murder of a 15-year-old Mexican student who had dropped out of high school to help his family. Black and Hispanic leaders called for peace at a news conference Monday afternoon, before police deployed several officers to Federal Hill near Digital Harbor High School to deter groups of students from fighting in the streets.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | May 15, 2014
Among my fellow liberals this is not a popular view: Brown v. Board, the historic Supreme Court decision of May 1954, has had negative consequences as well as positive. The unanimous decision of the court was intended to ensure that black students would have equal access to public schools and a far better education than they were getting. It was obvious that separate was far from equal. White schools had better teachers, better facilities and better-performing students. If black children were able to sit side by side with white students, it was thought, the black children would learn more.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
At 16, Dorant Wells has experienced the complexities of what Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark school desegregation ruling, has wrought: He attended a middle school full of students of different colors and nationalities, but one where he sometimes felt there were lower expectations for black students. Now at his nearly all African-American high school, Milford Mill Academy in Baltimore County, he sees value in the special character of the school, while acknowledging he may be less prepared to enter a diverse world.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
It's been 76 years, but Lyn Henley doesn't consider it too late for the University of Maryland to do the right thing. In 1937, Henley's first cousin - Wilmeth Sidat-Singh - was blocked from playing in a football game at Maryland because he was black. The school didn't yet admit black students. Singh was a top player for Syracuse, Maryland's opponent on Saturday at Byrd Stadium. Rather than cause a stir, Syracuse benched Singh that day and lost the game, 13-0. Singh, a U.S. Army pilot, died in a plane crash in 1943.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
I commend Professor George La Noue for his careful and comprehensive analysis of the recent judicial decision concerning Maryland's historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) ( "Antiquated ruling on desegregation," Oct. 27). I concur in his observations and would like to add a couple of comments. When I came to Maryland almost a quarter century ago to join the University System of Maryland, I became engaged in a fascinating historical process. Wikipedia lists 106 HBCUs in the United States, including two- and four-year and various specialized institutions.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
After years of dismal suspension rates for Howard County's black students, school officials will conduct a formal study of why black students are disciplined more often than white students.The analysis is prompted by the school system's annual suspension report, to be presented at today's school board meeting, which found that black students and males in general continue to be disproportionately suspended from schools."We need to ask some very pointed questions about that," said Associate Superintendent James McGowan.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1994
This summer, while other youngsters are splashing in the pool, 40 Howard County students will be trying to find the value of "X" and learn the composition of the iron atom.The new, five-week Summer Bridge Program, sponsored by the school system's Black Student Achievement Program (BSAP), lets black middle and high school students take mathematics and science lessons to help prepare for the academic challenges of the next school year.The enrichment program begins June 27 and ends July 29 at Howard Community College.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
I was a bit confused by the letter Jeff Nelson wrote regarding the need for a White Student Union at Towson University. For the record, "white" is how most people would describe me. That's no more a part of my heritage than the fact that my eyes are blue. Now I claim no particular expertise in racial matters, but it seems to me that being black comes with a heritage, much more so than being white. White people in the U.S. were spared slavery, Jim Crow, segregation and having to struggle for equal rights.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The College Board reports that Maryland high school students again led the country last year in their pass rate on Advanced Placement tests. Even better, the board reported that more African-American students earned passing scores than ever before. That Maryland has been able to increase the number and diversity of students taking AP classes while continuing to see rising test scores is a hopeful sign as the state stands poised to adopt a more challenging curriculum. Last year, 29.6 percent of Maryland high seniors passed at least one of the AP exams, which are offered in 34 subjects including chemistry, calculus, English literature, history and foreign languages.
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