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NEWS
By Karlayne Parker and Karlayne Parker,UniSun Editor | October 7, 2007
The hot summer months are gone now. But that doesn't mean our memories of summer fun have faded. We've captured some of the summer's hottest events to help you remember what it was like to enjoy outdoor fun while wearing shorts, T-shirts, sandals and cool shades. For a group of people in their 40s and 50s, some of these events brought back memories of their youth, including a concert by George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic at the Stone Soul Picnic. The funkmaster and the band were among the featured acts at the annual picnic at Druid Hill Park.
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SPORTS
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 18, 2009
If you love baseball and care about the future of the game, you have to root for the Baltimore Black Sox. The Black Sox are a youth team in the 16-year-old division of the Mid-Atlantic Baseball Association. All but two of their players are African-American. Their coaches are African-American. And if you don't think this is remarkable, you haven't paid attention to what's going on with baseball in this country. The bottom line is this: The game has become an afterthought for many African-Americans.
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SPORTS
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 18, 2009
If you love baseball and care about the future of the game, you have to root for the Baltimore Black Sox. The Black Sox are a youth team in the 16-year-old division of the Mid-Atlantic Baseball Association. All but two of their players are African-American. Their coaches are African-American. And if you don't think this is remarkable, you haven't paid attention to what's going on with baseball in this country. The bottom line is this: The game has become an afterthought for many African-Americans.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | July 16, 2008
On the agenda for a recent two-week pilgrimage I made to Las Vegas was a totally wholesome event in which I participated along with a buddy who also committed journalism here at The Sun and now works at USA Today. The two of us were entered in a tournament featuring a decades-old baseball board game. Seventy devotees of something called the APBA baseball game gathered at the Palace Station in Vegas - site of O.J. Simpson's gimme-the-memoribilia event several months ago - to vie for the board-game championship playing with great teams of the past.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
Mencken: The American Iconoclast Marion Elizabeth Rodgers Shades of Glory: The Negro Leagues and the Story of African American Baseball Lawrence D. Hogan National Geographic Books / 418 pages / $35 Who knew Satchel Paige, the great African-American Hall of Famer, pitched for a Baltimore team? Well, he did. Back in 1930, Paige jumped from the Birmingham Black Barons in the National Negro League to the Baltimore Black Sox in the Eastern Colored League. Three months later, he jumped back.
SPORTS
October 10, 2005
QUESTION OF THE DAY Has the curse of the Bambino returned? It is last year's news. The "Curse of the Black Sox," now that's an issue. If the White Sox go all the way, poor "Shoeless" Joe Jackson can rest in peace at last. Joe Roman Baltimore It appears that it has indeed returned. Three strikes and they're out! Zina Makar Reisterstown Last fall, the Red Sox managed to capture the "Ghost of the Bambino." Recently, it was reported that the kidnapped "Ghost" broke free from his captors.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | September 9, 1999
ONE BY one, the guys are leaving. Buck Leonard, Frazier Robinson, Leon Day -- this summer, Henry Kimbro, our Elite Giants' star center-fielder and leadoff man, died at 87 in his home town, Nashville, Tenn.By now, any former regular in the Negro Leagues must be past 70. As far as the records show, no player for the Baltimore Black Sox, who preceded the Elites, is still alive. Before long, there won't be any former Elites, either.What, if anything, will be their memorial?The very sites of their home games -- respectively, Maryland Park at Bush and Russell streets in South Baltimore, an interlude at old Oriole Park in Waverly, Bugle Field off Edison Highway in East Baltimore, and a final year at Westport Stadium off Old Annapolis Road -- are hard to make out. Each terrain looks very different now.Material objects are most scarce.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | August 2, 1992
THE NEGRO BASEBALL LEAGUES: A PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY.Phil Dixon with Patrick J. Hannigan. Amereon House. 364 pages. $34.95JULY 2, 1903: THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF HALL-OF-FAMERBIG ED DELAHANTY.Mike Sowell. Macmillan.326 pages. $20. In publishing tradition, new baseball books appear as a new pennant race begins. However, a book about Ed Delahanty, who drowned in the Niagara River in mid-season, can logically come out on that mournful anniversary; as for the best picture book on pre-Jackie Robinson black players, it is welcome whatever the season.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 1, 2006
Opinion: There's only one appropriate response to Rafael Palmeiro's telling The Sun that if some team might happen to want him, "I don't see myself as someone who brings a lot of luggage." Is he kidding? Fact: Two of the 12 Negro leagues players going into the Hall of Fame this year have Baltimore connections. Jud Wilson played third base for the Baltimore Black Sox for most of the 1920s. Ben Taylor managed the Black Sox. Opinion: Forget the drama of all those trades and the gambles that various teams took.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Mike Klingaman and Candus Thomson and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
The chest thumps. The fingers sweeping from heart to sky. The little boy enveloped in his father's Popeye arms at home plate. The tearful moment between the record holder and the family of the 1960s home run hero. Were those moments just seven years ago part of baseball's greatest times or the biggest fraud since the Chicago Black Sox scandal of 1919? Jose Canseco's "tell-all" book on steroid abuse won't win prizes or shake baseball's foundation, but it could skew the way future generations view the long-ball era of the 1990s.
NEWS
By Karlayne Parker and Karlayne Parker,UniSun Editor | October 7, 2007
The hot summer months are gone now. But that doesn't mean our memories of summer fun have faded. We've captured some of the summer's hottest events to help you remember what it was like to enjoy outdoor fun while wearing shorts, T-shirts, sandals and cool shades. For a group of people in their 40s and 50s, some of these events brought back memories of their youth, including a concert by George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic at the Stone Soul Picnic. The funkmaster and the band were among the featured acts at the annual picnic at Druid Hill Park.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 1, 2006
Opinion: There's only one appropriate response to Rafael Palmeiro's telling The Sun that if some team might happen to want him, "I don't see myself as someone who brings a lot of luggage." Is he kidding? Fact: Two of the 12 Negro leagues players going into the Hall of Fame this year have Baltimore connections. Jud Wilson played third base for the Baltimore Black Sox for most of the 1920s. Ben Taylor managed the Black Sox. Opinion: Forget the drama of all those trades and the gambles that various teams took.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
Mencken: The American Iconoclast Marion Elizabeth Rodgers Shades of Glory: The Negro Leagues and the Story of African American Baseball Lawrence D. Hogan National Geographic Books / 418 pages / $35 Who knew Satchel Paige, the great African-American Hall of Famer, pitched for a Baltimore team? Well, he did. Back in 1930, Paige jumped from the Birmingham Black Barons in the National Negro League to the Baltimore Black Sox in the Eastern Colored League. Three months later, he jumped back.
NEWS
By JEFF BARKER and JEFF BARKER,SUN REPORTER | October 22, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Those old enough to have witnessed even an aging "Shoeless Joe" Jackson play baseball still marvel at a man with one of the sweetest strokes the game has ever seen. Part of it, they say, was the size of his hands. They were so large that they seemed to envelop "Black Betsy," the slightly curved, stained hickory bat that he swung so fluidly and had lovingly mounted on a wall of his South Carolina home after he retired. But for all his baseball acumen, Jackson would probably have had a hard time grasping that the debate over his banishment from the game would continue, with Congress playing a role, 85 years after he was among eight Chicago White Sox players banned in 1920 for allegedly conspiring to fix the 1919 World Series.
SPORTS
October 10, 2005
QUESTION OF THE DAY Has the curse of the Bambino returned? It is last year's news. The "Curse of the Black Sox," now that's an issue. If the White Sox go all the way, poor "Shoeless" Joe Jackson can rest in peace at last. Joe Roman Baltimore It appears that it has indeed returned. Three strikes and they're out! Zina Makar Reisterstown Last fall, the Red Sox managed to capture the "Ghost of the Bambino." Recently, it was reported that the kidnapped "Ghost" broke free from his captors.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Mike Klingaman and Candus Thomson and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
The chest thumps. The fingers sweeping from heart to sky. The little boy enveloped in his father's Popeye arms at home plate. The tearful moment between the record holder and the family of the 1960s home run hero. Were those moments just seven years ago part of baseball's greatest times or the biggest fraud since the Chicago Black Sox scandal of 1919? Jose Canseco's "tell-all" book on steroid abuse won't win prizes or shake baseball's foundation, but it could skew the way future generations view the long-ball era of the 1990s.
SPORTS
By JIM HENNEMAN | March 15, 1992
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Somebody said a long time ago that if you were in this business long enough, you'd eventually make every possible mistake.I've now officially been in this business long enough. And if Leon Day thinks I've been in it too long, he's got a legitimate reason.It seems that while culling information about Earl Weaver's possible nomination to the Hall of Fame and the nominees under consideration by the veterans committee, there was a serious case of miscommunication. It was mentioned that one problem the veterans committee has is the difficulty of nominating candidates while they are alive -- and that most of Weaver's competition would come from among the deceased.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | July 6, 2003
For someone known only to the cognoscenti, William Faris was a marvel. Watch- and clockmaker, silversmith, tavern keeper, gardener, man about town: Faris, born in London in 1728, was a l757-1804 Annapolitan. Never a nob, never a pol; what he did was, at age 63, start a journal of sights and doings. Scholars have been dipping into Faris for decades; now the Maryland Historical Society has published him in full: The Diary of William Faris (496 pages, $55). On an inverted-L plot on West Street, he had rabbits, pigs, bees, a cow, flowers (74 listed varieties)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
Sept. 28 started out swell for George Sisler. Before the game that Tuesday afternoon, the St. Louis Browns fans presented the American League's top hitter with a spanking new 1920 silver tea set - plaudits for a job well done. The Browns had flopped that season despite Sisler's heroics - he batted .407, with 19 home runs and 122 RBIs. What's more, the sturdy first baseman had cracked his 248th base hit the day before, matching the major league record set in 1911 by the Detroit Tigers' Ty Cobb.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | July 6, 2003
For someone known only to the cognoscenti, William Faris was a marvel. Watch- and clockmaker, silversmith, tavern keeper, gardener, man about town: Faris, born in London in 1728, was a l757-1804 Annapolitan. Never a nob, never a pol; what he did was, at age 63, start a journal of sights and doings. Scholars have been dipping into Faris for decades; now the Maryland Historical Society has published him in full: The Diary of William Faris (496 pages, $55). On an inverted-L plot on West Street, he had rabbits, pigs, bees, a cow, flowers (74 listed varieties)
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