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By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1996
Standing at the base of a Calvert Street statue dedicated to "Negro" military heroes, Angley Peterson reflected yesterday on the plight of fellow black soldiers who he said often were isolated and confused during the Vietnam War."But that was nothing compared to how our ancestors had it," said Mr. Peterson, dressed in a faded green military coat, tan beret and spit-shined Army boots. "They fought hard for a country that had enslaved them and treated them as though they were nothing. Still, they fought hard."
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 20, 2011
Nathan Bedford Forrest was a cotton planter and a trader in horses, cattle and black people. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Forrest, whose business dealings had made him wealthy, raised a cavalry unit to fight for the Confederacy. He is remembered as an instinctive military genius whose daring and unpredictability gave Union forces fits. He is also remembered for leading a rebel band that overwhelmed a Union stronghold, Fort Pillow, Tenn., massacring 300 mostly black soldiers and civilians, including children, after the soldiers had dropped their weapons.
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NEWS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | March 1, 1991
Richard Epps is 18 years old, black, proud, wears a stovepipe hair style and wooden beads and has some provocative ideas about blacks who fought in the Civil War.But come June, the senior at Milford Mill High School in Baltimore County will be trading in his hair cut, beads and perhaps even a few of his radical ideas. He's joining the Marines.Yesterday, as the war in the Persian Gulf appeared all but over, Epps and a group of fellow seniors marked the last day of Black History Month with a discussion of the role of black soldiers during the Civil War.Their guide was the movie "Glory," 1989's Academy Award-winning film about the trials and triumphs of the all-black Massachusetts 54th Regiment.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
On a cold November day in 1865, hundreds of United States Colored Troops who had served during the Civil War marched proudly in uniform through the streets of Harrisburg, Pa. The procession formed downtown near the state Capitol, winding its way to the mansion of a local abolitionist. There, the war heroes were praised for their service to the nation. The Pennsylvania Grand Review, the only event of its kind, attracted black soldiers from more than two dozen states, including Maryland, to celebrate the end of the Civil War. Next weekend, tourism officials hope to draw descendants of the troops, history buffs and travelers to a four-day celebration in Harrisburg.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 26, 1992
LEAVENWORTH, Kan. -- In the 1860s, it was a swampy meadow where black soldiers slept because they were barred from the white barracks. Last night it was to become the site of a monument to those soldiers, a 12-foot bronze statue of a black cavalryman pulling back the reins of his horse.The Buffalo Soldier Monument at the Army's Fort Leavenworth commemorates a chapter of military history that is at once proud, shameful and unsung: the existence of separate and unequal all-black regiments in the Army, from the end of the Civil War to the integration of the armed forces in 1952.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
John Zubritsky, a Civil War enthusiast and author, said he found mostly derogatory references to African-American Civil War soldiers during 15 years of planning, researching and writing his novel."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 13, 2007
At high noon yesterday, motorists heading north on Calvert Street as they approached Lexington Street could not help but notice the clanging and banging as workers labored to move the large bronze statue. It is probably the most attention the monument has received in its 30-plus years at the north end of Battle Monument Plaza, which sits in the middle of the 100 block of N. Calvert St. For years, the 13-foot-tall statue, which is dedicated to black soldiers, stood facing north on Calvert.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
The Army has charged two more black sergeants at Aberdeen Proving Ground with sexual misconduct involving female soldiers, further alarming Harford County NAACP officials who claim the military investigation is motivated by racial prejudice.Staff Sgt. Wayne Gamble and Sgt. 1st Class Ronald Moffett are the ninth and 10th black soldiers criminally charged since allegations of widespread sexual misconduct at the Army post were announced in November. Four cases have been resolved by court-martial or by administrative hearings.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1996
Mike Brown, a Maryland park ranger, marched into a West Baltimore elementary school wearing the dress blues of a Union Civil War soldier, with a sword at his hip and a .58-caliber Enfield rifle in one hand.By the time he finished giving a first-person account of the war as experienced by a black Civil War hero from Baltimore, Sgt. Maj. Christian A. Fleetwood, about 70 fifth-graders had touched his woolen uniform and explored the cruelties of slavery and combat.Mr. Brown, 41, a ranger at Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, has traveled the state for six years giving "living history" presentations about the role of African-Americans in the Civil War. He speaks to school and youth groups about 25 times a year.
TOPIC
By JONATHAN TILOVE and JONATHAN TILOVE,NATIONAL PARK SERVICE | February 14, 1999
RICHMOND, Va. - With his black skin and Union blue re-enactor's fatigues, Kenneth Brown thinks it the better part of valor not to trespass on the privately owned fields and forests that were once the Civil War battleground of New Market Heights. But standing beside the road last summer, Brown surveyed the hallowed grounds just above and beyond the one-time capital of the Confederacy. Here in the early autumn of 1864, in little better than an hour, 14 black Union soldiers won Medals of Honor for wresting the Heights, amid terrible casualties, from some of the Confederacy's toughest troops, and thereby proving to a doubting nation the mettle of their race.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com and Sun TV Critic | February 21, 2010
T he PBS documentary "For Love of Liberty" has a great and vital American story to tell. I just wish it had told it more effectively in TV terms. It needed to be less like a classroom presentation, and more like the all-engaging, sweeping historical saga that it has the makings to be. But even with its flaws, the film still offers a revealing look at the potential of Black History Month programming and the role that mainstream TV plays in shared memory and a group's sense of identity.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | April 21, 2008
I never saw my father wear a flag pin, but he was a patriot. He was more faithful to the United States of America than I would have been if my life had been as burdened by legally sanctioned racism. He grew up in the Jim Crow South, where his opportunities were severely limited. He attended inferior schools and was taught to be deferential to whites. He endured vicious bigotry inside the newly integrated Army, where he served as a lieutenant, and out. When he returned from Korea as a combat veteran, he bought a baby blue 1953 Chevrolet.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 13, 2007
At high noon yesterday, motorists heading north on Calvert Street as they approached Lexington Street could not help but notice the clanging and banging as workers labored to move the large bronze statue. It is probably the most attention the monument has received in its 30-plus years at the north end of Battle Monument Plaza, which sits in the middle of the 100 block of N. Calvert St. For years, the 13-foot-tall statue, which is dedicated to black soldiers, stood facing north on Calvert.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
His last name was common in South Carolina - maybe not as plentiful as "Smith" or "Jones," but it certainly wasn't unique. Then in John R. Gourdin's travels with the Marines, he began to realize he was meeting fewer and fewer people of the same name. For the next 15 years, he scoured phone books in search of other Gourdins, making contact in person or over the phone to trace their history. "Without exception, all of the Gourdins I've met, that I've run into, I've been able to trace them back to South Carolina," he said.
NEWS
October 9, 2003
The U.S. Colored Troops Institute will hold its Fall 2003 Civil War Conference this weekend, recognizing 17 black soldiers who earned the Medal of Honor for bravery and courage in combat during the Civil War. The event will honor those who fought and died to liberate 4 million black people from slavery, said author John Gourdin, president of the Central Maryland chapter of the Afro-American Historical Genealogical Society and chairman of the conference planning...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 20, 2002
DEMOCRATIC gubernatorial candidate Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend went to the podium Thursday evening to deliver her campaign message to Baltimoreans. Her forehead showed no signs of the browbeating it took to get her to the candidates' forum in the War Memorial Plaza building. For two weeks prior to the forum, the Townsend camp had hinted she might not attend. Previous engagement in Prince George's County, you understand. Then the message that many black voters aren't completely sold on Townsend must have sunk in with someone on her staff.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- After holding the documents in her hands, Margaret Tildon returned to her Washington home, closed the bathroom door and began to tremble.After late-night sessions at her computer and exhausting hours at the National Archives, she had found what she was searching for: a yellowed document so old she didn't want to touch it. It revealed that Ephraim M. Tilden, her great-grandfather and a black man, had fought in the Civil War in a Baltimore regiment of the U.S. Colored Infantry.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It would be easy, perhaps too easy, to put Vernon J. Baker on a pedestal and turn the modest, humble old soldier into a symbol.But Baker, 77, wants none of that."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2000
SOMMOCOLONIA, Italy - Albert O. Burke, 80, silently strolled around the ruins of a medieval fortress in the village where dozens of black servicemen were killed Dec. 26, 1944, and broke down. "I felt I owed it to the fellows to come back," he sobbed as two other frail veterans held him up. "But I don't think I want to come back here anymore." The place that stirred him so deeply was Sommocolonia, a poignant footnote in both World War II military history and the uncompleted story of America's black war veterans.
TOPIC
By JONATHAN TILOVE and JONATHAN TILOVE,NATIONAL PARK SERVICE | February 14, 1999
RICHMOND, Va. - With his black skin and Union blue re-enactor's fatigues, Kenneth Brown thinks it the better part of valor not to trespass on the privately owned fields and forests that were once the Civil War battleground of New Market Heights. But standing beside the road last summer, Brown surveyed the hallowed grounds just above and beyond the one-time capital of the Confederacy. Here in the early autumn of 1864, in little better than an hour, 14 black Union soldiers won Medals of Honor for wresting the Heights, amid terrible casualties, from some of the Confederacy's toughest troops, and thereby proving to a doubting nation the mettle of their race.
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