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By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 7, 1991
She has long, beautiful hair, a perfect figure and clothes to die for.Sound like Barbie? Almost: Meet Shani -- the newest Mattel invention for little girls.Shani is an 11 1/2 -inch doll with black features, including a broader nose and fuller lips. Her name means "marvelous" in Swahili, and Shani (SHAW-nee) already is earning that description among kids and retailers; early sales have been strong.But not everyone is enthralled. To some, Shani is reviving unresolved debates about what defines beauty -- especially for black women.
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NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 10, 2013
The civil rights movement was full of dynamic and evocative images. Today, even many of us born after its iconic moments were captured on film can describe Martin Luther King Jr.'s outstretched arm pointing a sea of people toward a future decades beyond the short span of his life, or German shepherds in Birmingham ripping into black skin, as if we had watched these events live. But 50 years after the March on Washington, one local institution is helping audiences revisit this period in American history and examine details that were largely overlooked.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | April 22, 1994
WHAT IF they gave a war and nobody cared? The astonishing level of brutality in Rwanda is getting considerable attention, but this is the exception that proves the rule.Last fall in Rwanda and neighboring Burundi, as many as 100,000 (by vague estimates) died in fighting following a coup, and it merited mostly news briefs in the American press.In Liberia, 150,000 were killed in 1989-90. In Angola, the death toll exceeds 100,000, twice the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.In Ethiopia, the figures after 17 years of civil war are in the hundreds of thousands, not counting starvation.
NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | April 22, 1994
WHAT IF they gave a war and nobody cared? The astonishing level of brutality in Rwanda is getting considerable attention, but this is the exception that proves the rule.Last fall in Rwanda and neighboring Burundi, as many as 100,000 (by vague estimates) died in fighting following a coup, and it merited mostly news briefs in the American press.In Liberia, 150,000 were killed in 1989-90. In Angola, the death toll exceeds 100,000, twice the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.In Ethiopia, the figures after 17 years of civil war are in the hundreds of thousands, not counting starvation.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 10, 2013
The civil rights movement was full of dynamic and evocative images. Today, even many of us born after its iconic moments were captured on film can describe Martin Luther King Jr.'s outstretched arm pointing a sea of people toward a future decades beyond the short span of his life, or German shepherds in Birmingham ripping into black skin, as if we had watched these events live. But 50 years after the March on Washington, one local institution is helping audiences revisit this period in American history and examine details that were largely overlooked.
NEWS
By Roxanne C. Smith | May 8, 1992
ONE DAY not long ago I stopped by the neighborhood market on my way home from classes. I go there frequently enough to be recognized by the store's Korean owners, who greet me cheerfully.That day the young woman who handles the sole register called out, "Hi, miss," as she sometimes does. I smiled and returned her greeting. I then went through the store's cramped aisles, selected the few items I needed and returned to the register. I saw that the clerk's cheerful demeanor had changed drastically.
FEATURES
By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 1997
Neophyte model Alek Wek walked into the Ford Models' New York office for an interview clad in oversized ribbed sweater and tights. Perhaps walked isn't quite the right word, because her carriage then was as regal, as upright, dignified even, as it was a few weeks ago when she raised the beauty bar on the high-fashion runways.There is about her, in the words of Katie Ford, an "aura," a spirit that makes even the simple act of entering a room a demonstration of powerful presence."There is a really strong aura about her that one moment is warm and endearing and at another moment is very regal and elegant.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1999
The sun rises big and bright and wintry and the wind blusters cold off the low fields when Charlie Stine dons his waders and stomps through the last thin ice on Massey Pond like Indiana Jones in search of the Lost Ark.On this clear sharp morning as winter ends, the Eastern Shore landscape has the spare beauty of a Rembrandt etching of Holland in winter. Charlie Stine -- Dr. Charles J. Stine in the catalog of the Johns Hopkins University School of Continuing Studies -- loves this place. He's been coming to this corner of Kent County for nearly 50 years, drawn by the mysterious ways of the very elusive Eastern tiger salamander.
NEWS
December 20, 2000
Do you know? How do polar bears find food in the snow? Answer: Polar bears have a good sense of smell. They can smell food from very far away, and can even sniff out seals hiding in the snow. Learn more! Visit Magnet, the polar bear at the Baltimore Zoo. Read "Snow Bear" by Jean Craighead George. 1. Polar bears are good swimmers. They can swim for hours and can travel as many as 43 miles a day. 2. The polar bear's thick white fur is made of clear, hollow hairs that reflect light and help heat the bear's black skin.
NEWS
December 19, 2001
The huge polar bear is the largest land carnivore (meat-eater) in the world. Its coat, which varies in color from white to yellow, helps it blend in with the snow. Woolly underhair and a thick layer of fat under its skin keep the polar bear warm in the chilly Arctic. Furry feet help the bear from slipping on ice as it hunts and plays in the snow. what's for DINNER? Polar bears hunt seals, walruses and small mammals. do you KNOW? How do polar bears find food in the snow? Answer: Polar bears have a good sense of smell.
NEWS
By Roxanne C. Smith | May 8, 1992
ONE DAY not long ago I stopped by the neighborhood market on my way home from classes. I go there frequently enough to be recognized by the store's Korean owners, who greet me cheerfully.That day the young woman who handles the sole register called out, "Hi, miss," as she sometimes does. I smiled and returned her greeting. I then went through the store's cramped aisles, selected the few items I needed and returned to the register. I saw that the clerk's cheerful demeanor had changed drastically.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 7, 1991
She has long, beautiful hair, a perfect figure and clothes to die for.Sound like Barbie? Almost: Meet Shani -- the newest Mattel invention for little girls.Shani is an 11 1/2 -inch doll with black features, including a broader nose and fuller lips. Her name means "marvelous" in Swahili, and Shani (SHAW-nee) already is earning that description among kids and retailers; early sales have been strong.But not everyone is enthralled. To some, Shani is reviving unresolved debates about what defines beauty -- especially for black women.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | June 4, 1995
Q: How can I find out more about Nippon marked china?A: Write the International Nippon Collectors' Club c/o Phil Fernkes, 112 Oak Ave. North, Owatonna, Minn. 55060. It offers an annual membership and informative bimonthly newsletter for $20. Or call (507) 451-4960 for information.Q: I have a bunch of original McDonald's stir rods from years ago. How can I find out more about them, and where can I take them to sell?A: Send a photocopy of the stirrers (which may be rare) to McDonald Collector, P.O. Box 83, Winnetka, Ill. 60093, enclosing a self-addressed stamped envelope for a reply or cash offer.
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