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NEWS
January 12, 1992
Ukraine's dispute with Russia over the fate of former Soviet land troops and the Black Sea naval fleet is worrisome not only because of security reasons. With their vast territories edging toward chaos and hunger, these pivotal republics of the Commonwealth of Independent States should be focusing on far more urgent matters.This is no inconsequential tiff. Unless it can be resolved quickly, the quarrel may undo the frail cooperation among former Soviet republics.The Black Sea fleet is a potent force.
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NEWS
By James Ron and Alexander Cooley | July 9, 2000
RUSSIA HAS worked out leasing agreements with some of the former Soviet states that enables it to keep its military assets on their territory. Why couldn't it be possible between Israel and the Palestinians? The way it would work: Israel would recognize Palestinian sovereignty over all of what were the Israeli-occupied territories in the West Bank and Gaza. Then, Palestine would rent back specific areas to the Israeli military. This leasing arrangement should be extended to the hard-line Jewish settlements blocking a peace deal.
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NEWS
August 19, 1992
The Black Sea fleet was the part of the Soviet navy that shadowed the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Eastern Mediterranean. Obsolete as it is, the fleet is capable of doing a powerful amount of harm, some of it nuclear. But with the lesson of the Yugoslav army in view, the Black Sea fleet is a menace particularly to the two countries that claim it, Russia and Ukraine. One of the things the 300-vessel armada has the capability to do is blow itself out of the water.Russia and Ukraine have threatened to destroy the Commonwealth of Independent States in their rival claims on the fleet, tied to their rival claims on the Crimean peninsula.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 1999
MOSCOW -- A Russian navy reconnaissance ship has been dispatched to the Mediterranean to keep watch on the NATO airstrikes against Yugoslavia, and a squadron of six more warships will follow, Defense Minister Igor Sergeyev said yesterday.The announcement came shortly after Sergeyev returned from a diplomatic trip to Yugoslavia and Germany with Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov that failed to bring about an end to the bombing and left Russian leaders even more determined to find the means to back up their verbal support for the Serbs.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 12, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russian-Ukrainian relations rose to the boiling point yesterday after 120 Ukrainian navy commandos seized a maintenance base of the disputed Black Sea Fleet near Odessa in a late-night raid that reportedly injured some Russian sailors and their family members.The Ukrainian Defense Ministry acknowledged that commandos raided the base Sunday night to arrest three Russian officers for their role in an incident Saturday.But it denied that anyone was hurt and said no damage was done.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
MOSCOW -- After years of doubt and tensions, the presidents of Russia and Ukraine signed a friendship treaty yesterday designed to strengthen the weak bonds between the two states.The treaty was signed in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, on Boris N. Yeltsin's first trip there as president of Russia. Many previous visits were scheduled or considered, but all were postponed because of tensions over the future of the Black Sea Fleet, territorial disputes in the ethnic Russian region of Crimea, which is part of Ukraine, and other issues.
NEWS
September 8, 1993
Poor Ukraine. More than other former Soviet republics, that southern state bordering on Poland, Hungary and Romania seemed to be a candidate for a successful independence. It had a manageable size, fertile soil, a sound industrial base.Yet in the past two years Ukraine has skidded from uncertainty to disaster.Unlike Russia, Ukraine has hardly started economic reforms. Privatization is lagging. Its leadership is in hopeless disarray. Its ersatz money is increasingly worthless: In August, one dollar was worth 6,000 "coupons"; a month later it fetched 19,000.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 5, 1993
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's decision to sell its share of the disputed Black Sea Fleet and relinquish its nuclear warheads to Russia came under furious political assault yesterday, raising serious questions about whether the deal will stand.Ukrainian nationalists denounced the move as an act of "national betrayal" and demanded the resignation of President Leonid Kravchuk, who concluded the agreement in a meeting with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday. Several Ukrainian Parliament members said they would try to block the deal when it comes up for legislative review, according to reports from Kiev by the Itar-Tass and Interfax news agencies.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- In a new sign of the rapid fragmentation of the Soviet army, acting Commander in Chief Yevgeny I. Shaposhnikov disclosed yesterday that only five of the 11 members of the new Commonwealth of Independent States want to join in a unified armed forces.The remaining six, he said, want their own conventional armies, VTC although all are agreed that nuclear forces should remain under unified command.Mr. Shaposhnikov appealed for a two-year transition period to allow the 3.7-million-member Soviet army, the world's largest, to regroup "without losses, tears and blood."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | June 4, 1997
NATO ENLARGEMENT is succeeding faster than its designers dared hope. A week after resigning itself to NATO expansion and 5 1/2 long years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russia has finally acknowledged that Ukraine is an independent country.Westerners regard the continued existence of Ukraine -- which with temporary exceptions was ruled from Moscow for the three centuries before 1991 -- as the best single guarantee against any return of Russian imperialism. The latest Russian accommodation to post-Cold War realities is just the sort of stabilization of new and wannabe democracies that NATO has hoped to promote in central and eastern Europe.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | June 4, 1997
NATO ENLARGEMENT is succeeding faster than its designers dared hope. A week after resigning itself to NATO expansion and 5 1/2 long years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russia has finally acknowledged that Ukraine is an independent country.Westerners regard the continued existence of Ukraine -- which with temporary exceptions was ruled from Moscow for the three centuries before 1991 -- as the best single guarantee against any return of Russian imperialism. The latest Russian accommodation to post-Cold War realities is just the sort of stabilization of new and wannabe democracies that NATO has hoped to promote in central and eastern Europe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
MOSCOW -- After years of doubt and tensions, the presidents of Russia and Ukraine signed a friendship treaty yesterday designed to strengthen the weak bonds between the two states.The treaty was signed in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, on Boris N. Yeltsin's first trip there as president of Russia. Many previous visits were scheduled or considered, but all were postponed because of tensions over the future of the Black Sea Fleet, territorial disputes in the ethnic Russian region of Crimea, which is part of Ukraine, and other issues.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | March 27, 1997
THE UNSUNG SUCCESS of the Helsinki summit was the quiet boost it gave to Ukrainian as well as Polish security. The peace of new Central European members of NATO, the summit made clear, will not be bought at the price of greater insecurity for neighboring non-members farther east.This is the not-so-hidden message of the peaceboat diplomacy that followed the summit this week as ships from the U.S. and six other NATO countries visited the Ukrainian Black Sea port of Odessa.Joint NATO-Ukrainian naval maneuvers next August not far from Sevastopol, the Ukrainian city and naval base that the Russian parliament claims belongs to Russia, will repeat the message.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 11, 1995
MOSCOW -- Ukraine, where President Clinton arrives today, was for three years the place where the post-Soviet disaster was supposed to unfold -- but somehow never did.A year ago the country was hopelessly split along regional and ethnic lines. It had made no efforts at economic reform, its energy bills were skyrocketing, its finances a shambles. It faced a breakaway movement in the Crimea and nothing but difficulties in its relations with Russia.None of those problems has been solved. But Ukrainians have fended off total collapse, and the government installed in July finally seems to have found the will to push for economic reform.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 22, 1994
ODESSA, Ukraine -- If the potent forces of frustrated nationalism, economic distress and political division continue unchecked in Ukraine, what happened here April 10 could someday be remembered as the Fort Sumter of the Black Sea War.Late that day, Ukrainian airborne commandos stormed the small Russian-controlled navy base here, ousted Russian officers' families from their homes at gunpoint, ransacked their apartments and took control of the base....
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 12, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russian-Ukrainian relations rose to the boiling point yesterday after 120 Ukrainian navy commandos seized a maintenance base of the disputed Black Sea Fleet near Odessa in a late-night raid that reportedly injured some Russian sailors and their family members.The Ukrainian Defense Ministry acknowledged that commandos raided the base Sunday night to arrest three Russian officers for their role in an incident Saturday.But it denied that anyone was hurt and said no damage was done.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 22, 1994
ODESSA, Ukraine -- If the potent forces of frustrated nationalism, economic distress and political division continue unchecked in Ukraine, what happened here April 10 could someday be remembered as the Fort Sumter of the Black Sea War.Late that day, Ukrainian airborne commandos stormed the small Russian-controlled navy base here, ousted Russian officers' families from their homes at gunpoint, ransacked their apartments and took control of the base....
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | March 27, 1997
THE UNSUNG SUCCESS of the Helsinki summit was the quiet boost it gave to Ukrainian as well as Polish security. The peace of new Central European members of NATO, the summit made clear, will not be bought at the price of greater insecurity for neighboring non-members farther east.This is the not-so-hidden message of the peaceboat diplomacy that followed the summit this week as ships from the U.S. and six other NATO countries visited the Ukrainian Black Sea port of Odessa.Joint NATO-Ukrainian naval maneuvers next August not far from Sevastopol, the Ukrainian city and naval base that the Russian parliament claims belongs to Russia, will repeat the message.
NEWS
September 8, 1993
Poor Ukraine. More than other former Soviet republics, that southern state bordering on Poland, Hungary and Romania seemed to be a candidate for a successful independence. It had a manageable size, fertile soil, a sound industrial base.Yet in the past two years Ukraine has skidded from uncertainty to disaster.Unlike Russia, Ukraine has hardly started economic reforms. Privatization is lagging. Its leadership is in hopeless disarray. Its ersatz money is increasingly worthless: In August, one dollar was worth 6,000 "coupons"; a month later it fetched 19,000.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 5, 1993
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's decision to sell its share of the disputed Black Sea Fleet and relinquish its nuclear warheads to Russia came under furious political assault yesterday, raising serious questions about whether the deal will stand.Ukrainian nationalists denounced the move as an act of "national betrayal" and demanded the resignation of President Leonid Kravchuk, who concluded the agreement in a meeting with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday. Several Ukrainian Parliament members said they would try to block the deal when it comes up for legislative review, according to reports from Kiev by the Itar-Tass and Interfax news agencies.
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