Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlack Radio
IN THE NEWS

Black Radio

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 6, 1992
If there was one remaining frontier that reggae master Bob Marley had yet to cross in late 1979, it was the resistance to his music by many African-Americans.Marley and his band, the Wailers, had already become well-known throughout Europe, Africa and on college campuses in the United States. He was respected by rock royalty. Concert tours were sellouts.But soul radio rarely played Marley's music, and the racial complexion of his audience reflected that fact. It bothered Marley that he wasn't reaching everyone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Pamela Audrey Hall, a former radio station program director who was active nationally in jazz and contemporary gospel music circles, died of cancer Jan. 21 at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 57 and lived in Ellicott City. She was named Black Radio's Music Director of the Year in 1992. Billboard Magazine also nominated her as music director of the year. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. William Martin Hall, a gynecologist at Sinai Hospital and the old Lutheran and Provident hospitals, who was a founder of the Garwyn Medical Center.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
The disc jockey on Baltimore's "92-Q" never saw the shot coming.He figured he'd be solid with the boss when he announced on the air that he wouldn't repeat a few songs in that afternoon's show because the lyrics were vulgar. He'd been inspired by the Million Man March and challenged by a listener to stop playing that nasty music. No problem, he figured. After all, wasn't station owner Cathy Hughes always talking about doing good for the community?Somebody needed to take the young man aside and educate him about Cathy Hughes.
FEATURES
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
The disc jockey on Baltimore's "92-Q" never saw the shot coming.He figured he'd be solid with the boss when he announced on the air that he wouldn't repeat a few songs in that afternoon's show because the lyrics were vulgar. He'd been inspired by the Million Man March and challenged by a listener to stop playing that nasty music. No problem, he figured. After all, wasn't station owner Cathy Hughes always talking about doing good for the community?Somebody needed to take the young man aside and educate him about Cathy Hughes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Pamela Audrey Hall, a former radio station program director who was active nationally in jazz and contemporary gospel music circles, died of cancer Jan. 21 at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 57 and lived in Ellicott City. She was named Black Radio's Music Director of the Year in 1992. Billboard Magazine also nominated her as music director of the year. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. William Martin Hall, a gynecologist at Sinai Hospital and the old Lutheran and Provident hospitals, who was a founder of the Garwyn Medical Center.
FEATURES
October 13, 1997
A three-part documentary series, "National Desk" (11 p.m.-midnight, MPT, Channels 22 and 67), addresses patterns in American life that are "eroding common culture." In "Redefining Racism: New Voices From Black America," radio talk-show host Larry Elder studies the differences between blacks and whites, while offering hopeful signs that point toward reconciliation. PBS.Pub Date: 10/13/97
NEWS
January 18, 2007
POOKIE HUDSON, 72 Singer, songwriter for the doo-wop group the Spaniels Pookie Hudson, 72, lead singer and songwriter for the doo-wop group the Spaniels, who lent his romantic tenor to hits including "Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight" and influenced many other artists, died Tuesday at his home in Prince George's County of complications from cancer of the thymus. Mr. Hudson, who lived in Capitol Heights, continued performing until last fall, when he learned that his cancer had returned after a remission.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 24, 1992
NBC's unveils its "Cosby" strategy tonight with the debut of "Rhythm & Blues." And there are big, big bucks riding on this show and game plan."Rhythm & Blues," a sitcom about a black radio station in Detroit that hires a white disc jockey by mistake, is not expected to replace "Cosby" directly. Long-time ratings-winner, "A Different World," has been moved from 8:30 p.m. to the lead-off spot at 8 p.m., which "Cosby" held for so many years and for so many, many millions of dollars on NBC.But "Rhythm & Blues" is being asked to replace "A Different World" at 8:30 and keep the audience tuned to NBC for "Cheers" at 9. That's a huge order, especially in light of the competition on Fox in the form of "Martin," another sitcom about the world of Detroit radio that stars Martin Lawrence and is already looking like a hit.If "Rhythm & Blues" loses the NBC audience from "A Different World" to Fox and "Martin" at 8:30, NBC is in a world of trouble on what used to be its biggest night.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
Fred Robinson, 60, who as "Rockin' Robin" became one of the first popular black radio personalities in Baltimore, died Friday of complications from a stroke at Pikesville Nursing and Convalescent Center.Robinson was president of Premiere Attractions, a company that brought popular acts -- including many of the groups that pioneered the Motown sound -- to the Baltimore Civic Center. His former wife said he received recognition in the 1960s from Frank Sinatra for promoting "My Way.""Frank gave him a gold record for breaking the record in," said Florine Wise Robinson.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
Linda Shevitz develops study plans about womenHistory, Linda Shevitz wants you to know, isn't only about male presidents or male inventors or male generals.It's also about jockeys, scientists, humanitarians and even a U.S. surgeon general, all of whom happen to be women.Thanks to Ms. Shevitz, 714,000 students are learning that this month.As a "gender equity specialist" for the state Department of Education, she develops the public school curriculum for Women's History Month in March."I have been impressed, amazed and moved by the diversity of women who have done incredible things and also by how little recognition many of them have gotten," she says.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 6, 1992
If there was one remaining frontier that reggae master Bob Marley had yet to cross in late 1979, it was the resistance to his music by many African-Americans.Marley and his band, the Wailers, had already become well-known throughout Europe, Africa and on college campuses in the United States. He was respected by rock royalty. Concert tours were sellouts.But soul radio rarely played Marley's music, and the racial complexion of his audience reflected that fact. It bothered Marley that he wasn't reaching everyone.
NEWS
By Clarence Lusane | December 8, 1997
WHILE THE nation remains riveted to the latest updates on the McCaughey septuplets born on Nov. 19, the story of African-American sextuplets born on May 8 went unnoticed for months.Bobbi and Kenny McCaughey are now household names. They are also white and middle class. Jacqueline and Linden Thompson, of Caribbean heritage, are black, working-class residents of Washington, D.C. The difference in treatment accorded the two families was as stark as black and white.President Clinton took time to call the McCaugheys and invite them to the White House for a visit.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 28, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Nervously acknowledging his inability to defend his client in a racially charged cop-killing case 13 years ago, the former attorney for condemned black radio journalist Mamia Abu-Jamal testified yesterday that he never saw TC medical examiner's report that indicated that a gun of a different caliber from Abu-Jamal's was the murder weapon.Attorney Anthony E. Jackson also testified that no witnesses except Abu-Jamal were called and no evidence was presented on Abu-Jamal's behalf in the 1982 hearing that determined that the journalist was to be executed for the murder of a city police officer.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.