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By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 13, 1995
On Sundays such as this, The Baltimore Times arrives. There are 32,000 copies printed each week, which are distributed through scores of the area's black churches, and through supermarkets and street boxes, and in this politically charged season its arrival tends to make the mayor of this city, Kurt L. Schmoke, duck for cover.Consider these words, from a recent front-page editorial written by the Rev. Peter Bramble, 49-year-old pastor at West Baltimore's St. Katherine's Episcopal Church who owns the Times and makes it a kind of political extension of his pulpit:"For the first time in his political life, Schmoke is wrapping himself in blackness -- African-American flag colors and symbols.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The summer may have ended, but pride season in Baltimore has not. The city's annual Baltimore Black Pride events kick off next week, including nights out on the town, parties for youth and cultural events. The week culminates on Sunday, Oct. 12 with a Fall Festival at Club Bunns on W. Lexington Avenue at 4 p.m. This year's events are the first to be thrown by The Center for Black Equity - Baltimore, the new name taken up this year by Baltimore Black Pride, Inc. The change brings the organization, which has been working in Baltimore for more than a decade, under the umbrella of the national Center for Black Equity.
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NEWS
April 3, 1995
Sometimes an eight-cent bumper sticker can speak volumes.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has been distributing a bumper sticker for his re-election bid in the tri-colors long associated with African-American pride. "Mayor Schmoke Makes Us Proud," it reads.Politicians have always made unique appeals to their own and to other ethnic groups. The Italians are awash in blarney on St. Patrick's Day and gentile pols stress pro-Israel positions in the Jewish neighborhoods. So what's wrong with Baltimore's first elected black mayor reaching out to voters in this majority black city?
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
While a part of me feels it would be more apropos for the Maryland football team to wear black in its last Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season home game, and not its next to last, here we are. BREAKING: Game time set for Maryland Football vs. Syracuse on 11/9, we will kickoff at 3:30pm. #BlackoutByrd - Maryland Athletics (@umterps) October 28, 2013 A specially hashtagged event at Byrd Stadium can mean but one thing: special uniforms. The Terps are heading back to their "Maryland Pride" wardrobe, and the color of choice Saturday will be ... black .
NEWS
By JEAN THOMPSON AND M. DION THOMPSON | November 24, 1996
LONG BEFORE "The Civil War" raged on public television and families discovered their "Roots" with Alex Haley, early America's conflicted race relations inspired the writing of Benjamin Quarles. A historian by training, a writer at heart, he believed the version of America's history accepted in his day was incomplete.At his death on Nov. 16 at age 92, Quarles, a former professor and chairman of the history department at Morgan State University, left a legacy of scholarship that filled the void, revealing a richer and more complicated story of the founding and development of this country.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 2, 2002
SUN SCORE ** Intermittently throughout Sunshine State, Mary Steenburgen, who gives a splendid comic performance as a small-town Chamber of Commerce honcho, can't help letting the effort to stay positive during her "Buccaneer Days" weekend (a new "tradition" minted as a tourist ploy) smudge her character's determined smile. Her expressions of weariness echo what moviegoers may feel, too, as writer-director John Sayles' latest attempt to craft a state-of-the-union movie - in this case, centered in Florida - marches toward its second hour en route to completing its 141-minute running time.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | September 2, 1995
Since no one can surmount the problems facing American cities, presumably, we are invited as consolation to vote our prejudice in the city Democratic primary.The driving force for this comes from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who enjoys the best-funded campaign, devoted almost entirely to black consciousness and black male pride.Nothing in his years in office as a serious and fair (if distant) servant of all people prepared us for this. It must come from somewhere else.Mr. Schmoke's campaign mentor, Larry Gibson, has never let him down.
NEWS
By Michael Eric Dyson | June 23, 1995
THE BLISTERING attacks on gangsta rap reveal the fury this music can evoke. Many elements of gangsta rap are certainly disturbing. Equally dismaying has been the scape-goating of its artists. How can we avoid the pitfall of unfairly attacking black youth for problems that bedeviled our culture long before they came on the scene?If the 15-year evolution of hip-hop teaches us anything, it is that history is made in unexpected ways by unexpected people with unexpected results. Rap is now safe from the perils of quick extinction that was predicted at its humble start.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
From a ballroom performance show to a discussion on hate crimes with Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts, the next two weeks are packed with a wide variety of Baltimore Black Pride events. And they start tonight! With the theme "A New Era: Evolution 2013," this year's events are meant to support the organization's goals of outreach and education within the black LGBT population of Baltimore. They are the first Black Pride events planned under a new partnership between Baltimore Black Pride and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
Baltimore Black Pride and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB) -- two of Baltimore's LGBT advocacy groups -- have formed a partnership to provide joint LGBT outreach and services, they announced in a statement Tuesday. As part of their collaboration, both groups will assist each other in planning and executing Baltimore Pride, held by the GLCCB in June, and Baltimore Black Pride, which takes place during LGBT History Month on October 7-13.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
When the first gay and lesbian couples legally allowed to marry in Baltimore began preparing for their big moment at City Hall in the first minutes of 2013, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was there to officiate. She'd campaigned to help make same-sex marriages legal in Maryland, and seemed genuinely happy that night to help them happen in Baltimore. In June, Rawlings-Blake was named Grand Marshal of Baltimore Pride, and then, this weekend, she was given an "ICONS We Love" award as part of Baltimore Black Pride.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts offered an open hand to the LGBT community at a hate-crime forum in Mount Vernon on Thursday night, saying he wants to stand "shoulder-to-shoulder" with community members to improve officers' interactions with them on the ground. "We're here to be open, we're here to engage, we're here to be part of the community -- all parts of the community," Batts said. The event, held at the Waxter Center as part of this week's Baltimore Black Pride celebration, drew a small crowd -- organizers said the rain probably kept some away -- but had a large presence from the police department, with the department's top brass heavily represented.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
From a ballroom performance show to a discussion on hate crimes with Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts, the next two weeks are packed with a wide variety of Baltimore Black Pride events. And they start tonight! With the theme "A New Era: Evolution 2013," this year's events are meant to support the organization's goals of outreach and education within the black LGBT population of Baltimore. They are the first Black Pride events planned under a new partnership between Baltimore Black Pride and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
Baltimore Black Pride and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB) -- two of Baltimore's LGBT advocacy groups -- have formed a partnership to provide joint LGBT outreach and services, they announced in a statement Tuesday. As part of their collaboration, both groups will assist each other in planning and executing Baltimore Pride, held by the GLCCB in June, and Baltimore Black Pride, which takes place during LGBT History Month on October 7-13.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 2, 2002
SUN SCORE ** Intermittently throughout Sunshine State, Mary Steenburgen, who gives a splendid comic performance as a small-town Chamber of Commerce honcho, can't help letting the effort to stay positive during her "Buccaneer Days" weekend (a new "tradition" minted as a tourist ploy) smudge her character's determined smile. Her expressions of weariness echo what moviegoers may feel, too, as writer-director John Sayles' latest attempt to craft a state-of-the-union movie - in this case, centered in Florida - marches toward its second hour en route to completing its 141-minute running time.
NEWS
By JEAN THOMPSON AND M. DION THOMPSON | November 24, 1996
LONG BEFORE "The Civil War" raged on public television and families discovered their "Roots" with Alex Haley, early America's conflicted race relations inspired the writing of Benjamin Quarles. A historian by training, a writer at heart, he believed the version of America's history accepted in his day was incomplete.At his death on Nov. 16 at age 92, Quarles, a former professor and chairman of the history department at Morgan State University, left a legacy of scholarship that filled the void, revealing a richer and more complicated story of the founding and development of this country.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
When the first gay and lesbian couples legally allowed to marry in Baltimore began preparing for their big moment at City Hall in the first minutes of 2013, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was there to officiate. She'd campaigned to help make same-sex marriages legal in Maryland, and seemed genuinely happy that night to help them happen in Baltimore. In June, Rawlings-Blake was named Grand Marshal of Baltimore Pride, and then, this weekend, she was given an "ICONS We Love" award as part of Baltimore Black Pride.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The summer may have ended, but pride season in Baltimore has not. The city's annual Baltimore Black Pride events kick off next week, including nights out on the town, parties for youth and cultural events. The week culminates on Sunday, Oct. 12 with a Fall Festival at Club Bunns on W. Lexington Avenue at 4 p.m. This year's events are the first to be thrown by The Center for Black Equity - Baltimore, the new name taken up this year by Baltimore Black Pride, Inc. The change brings the organization, which has been working in Baltimore for more than a decade, under the umbrella of the national Center for Black Equity.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | September 2, 1995
Since no one can surmount the problems facing American cities, presumably, we are invited as consolation to vote our prejudice in the city Democratic primary.The driving force for this comes from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who enjoys the best-funded campaign, devoted almost entirely to black consciousness and black male pride.Nothing in his years in office as a serious and fair (if distant) servant of all people prepared us for this. It must come from somewhere else.Mr. Schmoke's campaign mentor, Larry Gibson, has never let him down.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 13, 1995
On Sundays such as this, The Baltimore Times arrives. There are 32,000 copies printed each week, which are distributed through scores of the area's black churches, and through supermarkets and street boxes, and in this politically charged season its arrival tends to make the mayor of this city, Kurt L. Schmoke, duck for cover.Consider these words, from a recent front-page editorial written by the Rev. Peter Bramble, 49-year-old pastor at West Baltimore's St. Katherine's Episcopal Church who owns the Times and makes it a kind of political extension of his pulpit:"For the first time in his political life, Schmoke is wrapping himself in blackness -- African-American flag colors and symbols.
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