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By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,david.nitkin@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
Barack Obama, the Illinois Democrat who built a campaign and a movement around the promise of change, won a resounding victory over Republican John McCain last night, becoming the first black president in U.S. history. Choosing a steady 47-year-old lawyer and former community organizer to guide the nation, voters looked past Obama's relative lack of national experience to end eight years of Republican leadership amid a once-in-a-century economic crisis and protracted foreign wars. Hundreds of thousands of supporters gathered in Grant Park in Chicago, which Obama represented in the Illinois Legislature just 46 months ago, as the Democrat was declared the winner about 11 p.m. Eastern time.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 9, 2013
Seldom does the death of a foreign leader touch the hearts and minds of Americans as did the passing at age 95 of Nelson Mandela, who suffered, struggled and eventually led South Africa out of the scourge of racial apartheid and became, almost miraculously, its president. He rose to prominence in his embattled country and eventually throughout the world as the central figure in the fight for racial and human justice after 27 years of harsh imprisonment on a desolate island redoubt.
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NEWS
January 19, 2009
A black nanny holding a porcelain-skinned infant patiently awaits her mistress' return outside a store in Charleston, S.C. Her stoic expression suggests the stranger snapping pictures, like the child in her arms, is one more burden to be endured. Robert Frank captured this poignant image in the late 1950s while traveling around the country. The Swiss-born photographer later included it in his book The Americans, which appeared exactly 50 years ago and is now the subject of a major exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
I predict that the Nov. 6, 2012 election will be a benchmark in American history. The re-election of a black president is a bugle call to the future to begin. The status quo is dying to make way for a new sense of democracy. The numbers showed that there are more of "us" then there are of "them. " The Republican Party could not muster enough of their camp to overtake those of us who want change. This alone is historical. Moreover, here are the historical reasons for my prediction: Since the nation re-elected Barack Obama, bigotry is in decay.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 7, 1998
Black Americans overwhelmingly and wholeheartedly support President Clinton, while majorities of whites have become critical of him and have even begun to abandon him, according to some polls.Striving to explain that, Harvard sociologist Orlando Patterson said this in a recent interview on Public Broadcasting's "The NewsHour": "The president is actually culturally very Afro-American." And Nobel Prize novelist Toni Morrison went so far as to say in a New Yorker piece, "Years ago, in the middle of the Whitewater investigation, one heard the first murmurs: White skin notwithstanding, this is our first black president."
NEWS
November 28, 2012
I predict that the Nov. 6, 2012 election will be a benchmark in American history. The re-election of a black president is a bugle call to the future to begin. The status quo is dying to make way for a new sense of democracy. The numbers showed that there are more of "us" then there are of "them. " The Republican Party could not muster enough of their camp to overtake those of us who want change. This alone is historical. Moreover, here are the historical reasons for my prediction: Since the nation re-elected Barack Obama, bigotry is in decay.
NEWS
December 24, 2009
ANN NIXON COOPER, 107 Was lauded by Obama on Election Night Ann Nixon Cooper, the Atlanta centenarian lauded by President Barack Obama in his Election Night speech last year, died Monday at her southwest Atlanta home. She would have turned 108 on Jan. 9. In his 2008 speech, President Obama called Mrs. Cooper an example of "the heartbreak and the hope" of the past century. He noted she was born at a time when women and blacks couldn't vote and lived to cast her ballot for the country's first black president.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
I've come aboard as the new editor of UniSun at a time of great promise and strong pride for people of color. Indeed, it's been an inspiring year for black Americans, many of whom never thought they would live to see a black man in the White House's Oval Office. With Barack Obama's amazing and historic triumph on Nov. 4, we now have a president-elect and first family who look a lot like you and me. I know it took a lot of sacrifice and struggle to get to this moment of change. But as a daughter of the South, too young to have participated in the civil rights movement, I see it as a beginning, not an ending.
NEWS
By Lionel Foster | October 4, 2012
If you haven't done so already, you should stop right now and read a piece by another young journalist from Baltimore, "Fear of a Black President," the September cover story by The Atlantic's Ta-Nehisi Coates. I'm serious. It's really good. Here's a paragraph break so that you know where to pick this up. Welcome back. Now as you'll recall, Mr. Coates points out the irony of America's first black president barely mentioning the subject of race at all. It's certainly an issue for other people.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
Former President Jimmy Carter voiced what a lot of President Barack Obama's supporters have been thinking recently: that an underlying factor in the passionate opposition in some quarters to Mr. Obama's policies has something to do with his race. They point to the diffuse anger of "tea party" protesters and others, who go beyond opposing particular policies and passionately decry a country they say they don't recognize anymore. President Carter said he believes that "an overwhelming portion of the intensely demonstrated animosity toward President Barack Obama is based on the fact that he is a black man."
NEWS
By Lionel Foster | October 4, 2012
If you haven't done so already, you should stop right now and read a piece by another young journalist from Baltimore, "Fear of a Black President," the September cover story by The Atlantic's Ta-Nehisi Coates. I'm serious. It's really good. Here's a paragraph break so that you know where to pick this up. Welcome back. Now as you'll recall, Mr. Coates points out the irony of America's first black president barely mentioning the subject of race at all. It's certainly an issue for other people.
NEWS
December 24, 2009
ANN NIXON COOPER, 107 Was lauded by Obama on Election Night Ann Nixon Cooper, the Atlanta centenarian lauded by President Barack Obama in his Election Night speech last year, died Monday at her southwest Atlanta home. She would have turned 108 on Jan. 9. In his 2008 speech, President Obama called Mrs. Cooper an example of "the heartbreak and the hope" of the past century. He noted she was born at a time when women and blacks couldn't vote and lived to cast her ballot for the country's first black president.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
Former President Jimmy Carter voiced what a lot of President Barack Obama's supporters have been thinking recently: that an underlying factor in the passionate opposition in some quarters to Mr. Obama's policies has something to do with his race. They point to the diffuse anger of "tea party" protesters and others, who go beyond opposing particular policies and passionately decry a country they say they don't recognize anymore. President Carter said he believes that "an overwhelming portion of the intensely demonstrated animosity toward President Barack Obama is based on the fact that he is a black man."
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Timothy B. Wheeler and Kelly Brewington and Timothy B. Wheeler,Kelly.Brewington@baltsun.com and tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 18, 2009
So far, authorities believe James von Brunn, the Maryland man accused of killing a security guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, acted alone. But the anti-Semitic and racist views he has expressed in decades of rants - in court testimony, on his Web site and in a self-published book - represent the convictions of a deeply rooted community of extremists now taking advantage of technology to attract new recruits. At least 13 such outfits now operate in Maryland, according to trackers of hate groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
In his trademark deadpan delivery, comic Larry Lancaster tells the audience at Magooby's Joke House that underachieving African-American men like him are ambivalent about Barack Obama's election to the highest office in the land. "A lot of black guys have mixed feelings about Obama being president," Lancaster says. "Now, we have no more excuses. Every time someone says, 'Hey, Tyrone, how come you don't have a job?' we can't say, 'Damn, The Man is holding me down.' " Lancaster switches roles, enacting the part of Tyrone's heckler.
NEWS
January 19, 2009
A black nanny holding a porcelain-skinned infant patiently awaits her mistress' return outside a store in Charleston, S.C. Her stoic expression suggests the stranger snapping pictures, like the child in her arms, is one more burden to be endured. Robert Frank captured this poignant image in the late 1950s while traveling around the country. The Swiss-born photographer later included it in his book The Americans, which appeared exactly 50 years ago and is now the subject of a major exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
NEWS
By Rex W. Huppke and Stacy St. Clair and Rex W. Huppke and Stacy St. Clair,Chicago Tribune | November 5, 2008
CHICAGO - Streaming into an unparalleled moment in history, tens of thousands lit up Grant Park with a display of election night electricity not seen in generations. Under crystal skies and a crescent moon, they came from across the country and around the world, stood shoulder to shoulder and cheered joyously for President-elect Barack Obama, each drawn for reasons as diverse as the faces around them. "The energy is shifting," said Linda Robb, a white woman from Buffalo Grove who burst into tears as Obama won. "There is a transformational shift happening - consciousness is being raised."
NEWS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,rick.maese@baltsun.com | November 3, 2008
Neither Virginia Battle nor her husband, Henry, thought they'd live to see a day like this, when a black man was a major party nominee with a chance to be elected president. "I didn't think I'd be here," says Henry, an African-American who's been voting for white presidents since 1940. "But now that I'm here, yes, I believe. I believe this country has been waiting for this day. The whole country." Both 86, the Battles have been married for 62 years, have three children, 12 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
NEWS
January 18, 2009
BENJAMIN TODD JEALOUS, PRESIDENT, NAACP 'Beginning of a new era of higher hopes' As when Neil Armstrong took the first steps on the moon, or Intel introduced the first microprocessor, Obama's presidency ushers in a new era of possibility. It will not just be a great day for black people, folks with "funny names," or children of immigrants from the global south and east. It will be a great day for all people when President Barack Hussein Obama is sworn into office. For the NAACP, and for everyone who has worked toward this moment, toward a country that finds unity in and draws strength from its diversity, this moment is to be celebrated.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
I've come aboard as the new editor of UniSun at a time of great promise and strong pride for people of color. Indeed, it's been an inspiring year for black Americans, many of whom never thought they would live to see a black man in the White House's Oval Office. With Barack Obama's amazing and historic triumph on Nov. 4, we now have a president-elect and first family who look a lot like you and me. I know it took a lot of sacrifice and struggle to get to this moment of change. But as a daughter of the South, too young to have participated in the civil rights movement, I see it as a beginning, not an ending.
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