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NEWS
June 16, 1995
If Mary Pat Clarke were to defeat incumbent Mayor Kurt Schmoke in the citywide elections this year, would that set back black political power in Baltimore? Not necessarily. In fact, not at all. There is no way Mrs. Clarke -- or any candidate -- could be elected without substantial support from black voters. As a practical matter that means whoever becomes the city's next mayor will owe their election to the black power revolution.Yet to date no American city of comparable size in which blacks constitute a majority has ever replaced an incumbent black mayor with a white challenger.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The director of Baltimore's African-American history museum on Thursday defended his decision to bar a civil rights leader from an event marking the 50th anniversary of landmark legislation after she questioned the decision to include a convicted murderer among the honorees. A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, said he barred Helena Hicks, 80, from the premises last week because he "could not be assured that she would be respectful and courteous to other panel members and in the presence of our audience" and "she might not be tolerant.
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NEWS
By DERRICK Z. JACKSON | May 27, 1992
Boston.-- The mud is deep, the rain is hard, the mule has run off, and there is no Rand McNally Road Atlas for African Americans seeking I-95 out of hell.So what is new? All that escaped slaves had were crusty toes and the North Star. All that many of our parents and grandparents had was a piece of land and a few hogs or a rat-infested, cold-water flat. All that Rosa Parks had was her behind, which changed America the day she refused to move it for white folks.America is burning in property and sanity.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 17, 2013
Jan Houbolt may be the most influential Baltimorean you've never heard of. As head of the Greater Baltimore Committee's Leadership Program since 1989, he has helped groom some of the state's up-and-coming leaders through a 10-month-long series of site visits and conversations that help them examine the city in all its complexity. Mr. Houbolt will retire in December, so this year's class, his 25th, will be his last. I talked to him about why a white sociology major from a historically black university took a job with Baltimore's business elite - and some of what he saw along the way. Q: Where did you grow up?
NEWS
November 21, 1998
IF ONLY Stokely Carmichael had stayed in this country, we would all be the better for it. Known in later years as Kwame Toure, he will be best remembered for the most famous -- or infamous -- phrase in the civil rights lexicon, "black power." But his vision and ability extended far beyond words.His death at the age of 57 recalled the heady days of the movement of the 1960s, the tense and sometimes deadly challenges to the racist status quo in the South and rioting in the rest of the country.
TOPIC
By Jay Apperson | April 22, 2001
IN BOWIE EARLIER this month, they crashed a "Unity Day" rally and scoffed at a pledge to reject bigotry. A few days later in Harlem, they protested Bill Clinton's plans to rent an office there and described the former president as a "cracker." Then, last weekend, the New Black Panthers climbed a stage in Cincinnati and found an even brighter spotlight. They eulogized the unarmed African-American teen-ager whose shooting death at the hands of police sparked days of rioting. When the service ended, they carried the casket from church to hearse, raising their clenched fists in the Black Power salute made famous in the turbulent 1960s.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | February 5, 1995
'When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things." -- First Corinthians: 13:1.The trouble with Charlisle Lyles is that she speaks as a child when her book pleads for the voice of an adult. Her portrayal of four pivotal years in her young life during the turbulent period following the slaying of Martin Luther King Jr. is often charming.But the memoir lacks Ms. Lyles' perspective as an adult, which appears only infrequently.
NEWS
By R. B. Jones | July 12, 1995
I DON'T know if Mayor Kurt Schmoke and his campaign manager Larry Gibson are fans of Cole Porter, but he wrote some lines that are very appropriate for their rather panic stricken and desperate campaign strategy: "It's the wrong time and the wrong place . . . it's the wrong song with the wrong style . . . it's the wrong game with the wrong chips."For a politician as "color neutral," and as unresponsive to the African-American community's hopes and dreams, much less its practical needs, as Mayor Schmoke, the use of a race-based campaign theme is hypocritical and more than a little insulting.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to harness the purchasing power of the nation's 30 million African-Americans, a Baltimore group announced yesterday that it is teaming up with Key Federal Savings Bank and American Express to provide millions of dollars for black colleges.The organization, America's Black Colleges, is promoting a Visa credit card issued by the Havre de Grace bank that will contribute a small percentage of each transaction to a fund providing scholarships and awards to 115 historically black schools, including five in Maryland.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The director of Baltimore's African-American history museum on Thursday defended his decision to bar a civil rights leader from an event marking the 50th anniversary of landmark legislation after she questioned the decision to include a convicted murderer among the honorees. A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, said he barred Helena Hicks, 80, from the premises last week because he "could not be assured that she would be respectful and courteous to other panel members and in the presence of our audience" and "she might not be tolerant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
The AFI Silver celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day each year with free screenings of "King: A Filmed Record … Montgomery to Memphis. " It's never been more pertinent. This year, at this moment, it provides a tonic for the soul. The movie delivers nuance and power simultaneously. Its central message is shaming, inspiring and stunning, all at once. When the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. urges his supporters to fight "physical force" with "soul force," his eloquence and tempered zeal can still bring you to your feet.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Dressed in a gold and tan dashiki shirt, William E. Lambert stepped out in front of the ritual table and spelled it out in plain terms for the gathering at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park & Museum in Catonsville: "As they say on the corner, 'We're all in this mess together.' That's what this is all about it. " So began the ceremonies on Day Three of the weeklong festival of Kwanzaa, an observance born of black nationalism of the 1960s that...
NEWS
By Sherrilyn A. Ifill | November 5, 2006
From Ohio to Maryland to Pennsylvania, political handicappers and pundits are focused on the impact the black vote will have on the outcome of key national and statewide races. Here in Maryland, the race to watch is for the Senate, where African-American Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele faces longtime Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin for an open seat. Will black voter turnout be high? Or will they "vote with their feet" and stay home, as a show of their disillusionment with the Democratic Party's failure to support the Senate candidacy of former congressman and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume in the primary?
NEWS
April 28, 2001
State hospital rates have not kept pace with increasing costs A rebuttal by the state hospital regulatory commission to a recent column by Barry Rascovar ("State can't afford prescription drugs," Opinion Commentary, March 25) left readers with the wrong impression ("Hospital rates reflect state's careful formula," letters, April 14). In recent years, Maryland hospital rates -- set by state regulations -- have not kept pace with inflation. The cost of salaries to recruit and retain a qualified workforce, investments in patient-safety initiatives and keeping up with new technologies and life-saving drugs has risen much more rapidly than the rates have.
TOPIC
By Jay Apperson | April 22, 2001
IN BOWIE EARLIER this month, they crashed a "Unity Day" rally and scoffed at a pledge to reject bigotry. A few days later in Harlem, they protested Bill Clinton's plans to rent an office there and described the former president as a "cracker." Then, last weekend, the New Black Panthers climbed a stage in Cincinnati and found an even brighter spotlight. They eulogized the unarmed African-American teen-ager whose shooting death at the hands of police sparked days of rioting. When the service ended, they carried the casket from church to hearse, raising their clenched fists in the Black Power salute made famous in the turbulent 1960s.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | November 29, 1998
DETAILED analyses of the Nov. 3 elections by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies show that the Democrats did much better than was realized at first glance.Turns out that what happened in Washington -- the dismal GOP showing on Election Day that upended the party's congressional leadership -- was only the tip of a iceberg.In House elections, for instance, African Americans gave 89 percent of their votes to Democrats, 11 percent to Republicans.Looking ahead and beyond the Washington beltway, the election results put Democrats in a position not only to retake the House and possibly the Senate in 2000, but also to deflate Republican hopes of becoming the majority party.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Dressed in a gold and tan dashiki shirt, William E. Lambert stepped out in front of the ritual table and spelled it out in plain terms for the gathering at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park & Museum in Catonsville: "As they say on the corner, 'We're all in this mess together.' That's what this is all about it. " So began the ceremonies on Day Three of the weeklong festival of Kwanzaa, an observance born of black nationalism of the 1960s that...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 21, 1998
THE FIRST TIME I SAW him was on a television newscast -- or it may have been a documentary -- with the inchoate Afro, the ebony complexion and the large eyes that seemed oh-so-innocent above the mouth that chanted the words, "We want black power!"It was 1966. Stokely Carmichael was then chairman of the radical wing of the the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a civil rights movement better known as SNCC. Carmichael shouted the words along the road to Greenwood, Miss. SNCC members had picked up the march where James Meredith had left off. In 1962, Meredith was the first black admitted to the University of Mississippi law school.
NEWS
November 21, 1998
IF ONLY Stokely Carmichael had stayed in this country, we would all be the better for it. Known in later years as Kwame Toure, he will be best remembered for the most famous -- or infamous -- phrase in the civil rights lexicon, "black power." But his vision and ability extended far beyond words.His death at the age of 57 recalled the heady days of the movement of the 1960s, the tense and sometimes deadly challenges to the racist status quo in the South and rioting in the rest of the country.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 21, 1998
THE FIRST TIME I SAW him was on a television newscast -- or it may have been a documentary -- with the inchoate Afro, the ebony complexion and the large eyes that seemed oh-so-innocent above the mouth that chanted the words, "We want black power!"It was 1966. Stokely Carmichael was then chairman of the radical wing of the the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a civil rights movement better known as SNCC. Carmichael shouted the words along the road to Greenwood, Miss. SNCC members had picked up the march where James Meredith had left off. In 1962, Meredith was the first black admitted to the University of Mississippi law school.
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