Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlack Political
IN THE NEWS

Black Political

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | November 1, 1994
WHO IS THE most powerful black political figure in Baltimore history? Among the elected officials: Parren Mitchell? Kurt Schmoke? Clarence "Du" Burns? Among those behind the scenes: William ("Little Willie") Adams? Larry Gibson? Thomas "Tom" R. Smith?Who is Tom Smith? Why just one of the most powerful black political bosses in Baltimore history. On election days in the 1920s and 30s, white politicians would turn to him to help roundup the black vote for the Democrats. That was at a time when most blacks were Republicans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 21, 2009
I felt as if I had gotten to know two of Maryland's political celebrities, Thurgood Marshall and Lena K. Lee, after spending a few hours this week at the University of Maryland's law library, which is named in the former Supreme Court justice's honor. I'll begin with Lena K. Lee, among the first black women elected to the Maryland General Assembly in the 1960s. Lee, who died at age 100 in 2006, donated her extensive papers to the library, which is making an overview of her life available on the Internet through its African Americans in the Law collection.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
A coalition of black political leaders endorsed a slate of Democratic and independent candidates for Annapolis' eight City Council seats yesterday, prompting one Republican incumbent to question the fairness of the selections.Sheryl Banks, chairwoman of the Black Political Forum of Anne Arundel County, said her group will attempt to rally the black community to the polls in the Nov. 2 election in an attempt to oust several incumbent Republicans."We're calling out to not only the African-American community but residents throughout this city," Ms. Banks said during a press conference at the First Baptist Church on Washington Street.
TOPIC
By Jonathan Tilove and Jonathan Tilove,NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2004
BOSTON - In coming years, last week's Democratic National Convention in Boston may be seen as a signal moment in the changing of the guard of the nation's black political leadership. It was the last act of the Rev. Al Sharpton's failed bid to grab the mantle long held by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and the debut star turn of Barack Obama, the state senator from Chicago who is the odds-on favorite to become only the third black person in the U.S. Senate since Reconstruction - and someone already being talked about for a future national ticket.
NEWS
June 16, 1995
If Mary Pat Clarke were to defeat incumbent Mayor Kurt Schmoke in the citywide elections this year, would that set back black political power in Baltimore? Not necessarily. In fact, not at all. There is no way Mrs. Clarke -- or any candidate -- could be elected without substantial support from black voters. As a practical matter that means whoever becomes the city's next mayor will owe their election to the black power revolution.Yet to date no American city of comparable size in which blacks constitute a majority has ever replaced an incumbent black mayor with a white challenger.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
The students were mad. The Annapolis High classroom was full of tense and unbelieving teen-agers the day after four white Los Angeles police officers were acquitted in the videotaped beating of black motorist Rodney King.Lt. Gary S. Simpson took one look around and scrapped his lesson plan. Instead, the veteran black Annapolis police officer opened up a frank discussion on race, violence and law enforcement.He handled it with his usual aplomb, displaying the same grace under pressure that caused him to rise through the ranks and win community recognition.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Stunned by the wave of death and destruction sweeping through black townships across the country, South Africa's top two black leaders held an urgent meeting yesterday to look for new ways to stop the warfare among their followers.After five hours of talks in the coastal city of Durban, black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela and Zulu leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi called on all South Africans to "pray and work actively for peace."It was the second meeting in two months between the two powerful men, whose rival organizations have been linked to the bloody fighting that has claimed more than 5,000 lives over the past five years.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | May 1, 1991
Less than an hour after Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall announced the hiring of a new police chief, who is white, a coalition of black politicians and community leaders criticized Neall's record in hiring and promoting minorities, calling it "Annpartheid."The Black Political Forum, a bi-partisan group, yesterday released a critical report on the county executive's first 100 days in office titled, "Bobby Neall's Days Has Lighthizer and Pascal's Ways."The forum's 14-page report accuses Neall of continuing in the tradition of former county executives Robert A. Pascal and O. James Lighthizer by excluding blacks from leadership positions and continuing to maintain "virtually an all-white, male-dominated power structure."
NEWS
June 14, 1994
What really should count at this week's NAACP summit in Baltimore is not who attends but what gets done. NAACP director Benjamin Chavis says he wants the focus more on finding solutions to the massive problems confronting black America today than on whether extremists like the Nation of Islam's Louis Farrakhan have a say in the proceedings. Mr. Chavis is being disingenuous. He knows a certain amount of controversy is inevitable and perhaps even desirable to stir interest in the event. But he is also a practical man who realizes that at the end of the day all of the participants -- most especially himself -- are going to be judged in terms of results, not rhetoric.
NEWS
October 6, 1996
THE PALTRY turnout for an African-American political convention that Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan promoted as the next step after the Million Man March was in a way more evidence of the power of that earlier event.Thousands of African-Americans who participated in the 1995 rally in Washington said the experience was spiritual and personal. They praised Mr. Farrakhan for staging it, but insisted the march was not about him. Sure enough, only a few hundred registered for the black political convention last weekend in St. Louis, an event that Mr. Farrakhan's surrogates had predicted 30,000 would attend.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | May 27, 2003
LOOK AT a spreadsheet and it resembles a sleeping giant waiting to wake up. The numbers are eye-popping. Blacks make up 27 percent of Maryland's population, the largest concentration outside the deep South. The city's black population hovers around 67 percent, while Prince George's County's is a tad higher at 70 percent. More to the point, the Maryland Court of Appeals, in its drastic reworking of the legislative map, awarded 80 percent of the city's political turf to blacks, who make up only 67 percent of the population.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 18, 2001
IT IS AMAZING HOW the common wisdom arrives, and gets it absolutely wrong. In Annapolis, the General Assembly votes last week to guarantee minority business people a bigger cut of the economic pie, and this is seen as evidence of the growing political power of black people. It should be precisely the opposite. And the proof could be seen in two front-page articles in this newspaper, placed next to each other the morning after last week's State House action: one covering the legislative vote and the other charting the continuing criminal pathology on impoverished streets, which now takes the life of another city cop. In Maryland, as in many places in America, there is still the out-of-proportion economic blight in black neighborhoods, and still the preponderance of crime there committed by African-Americans.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1998
SALISBURY -- For Rudolph and Honiss Cane, life has been about picking their battles and moving forward. And on the slow-to-change Eastern Shore, the brothers say, the next election is just one more reason to remain focused on the prize of equal opportunity.The men are veterans of the struggle to eliminate the at-large voting systems and other election laws that black leaders blamed for keeping them from power for decades.Rudolph, 63, a two-term Wicomico County commissioner, is bent on becoming the first African-American from the nine-county peninsula to win a seat in the General Assembly.
NEWS
October 6, 1996
THE PALTRY turnout for an African-American political convention that Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan promoted as the next step after the Million Man March was in a way more evidence of the power of that earlier event.Thousands of African-Americans who participated in the 1995 rally in Washington said the experience was spiritual and personal. They praised Mr. Farrakhan for staging it, but insisted the march was not about him. Sure enough, only a few hundred registered for the black political convention last weekend in St. Louis, an event that Mr. Farrakhan's surrogates had predicted 30,000 would attend.
NEWS
November 23, 1995
The National Political Congress of Black Women will charter a Howard County chapter at 4 p.m. Sunday in the Banneker Room of the George Howard Building, 3430 Court House Drive in Ellicott City."
NEWS
June 16, 1995
If Mary Pat Clarke were to defeat incumbent Mayor Kurt Schmoke in the citywide elections this year, would that set back black political power in Baltimore? Not necessarily. In fact, not at all. There is no way Mrs. Clarke -- or any candidate -- could be elected without substantial support from black voters. As a practical matter that means whoever becomes the city's next mayor will owe their election to the black power revolution.Yet to date no American city of comparable size in which blacks constitute a majority has ever replaced an incumbent black mayor with a white challenger.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ginger Thompson | July 22, 1991
In 1987, soon after Baltimore voters sent Mary Pat Clarke to City Hall as the first female president of the City Council, she sat down and wrote herself a long memo. It was an action agenda for the four years ahead, a term of office she then thought could very well be the only shot she would have at her stated goal of changing the political landscape of Baltimore and grooming the city's future leaders.Scratched out in longhand over seven pages and made available to only a few close aides, the memo reflected a schoolmarm's penchant for mastering the routine business of the job, a desire to emulate the street presence of former Mayor William Donald Schaefer, a commitment to aggressively deliver constituent services and an unabashed "go for it" attitude toward "busting up the status quo, black and white."
NEWS
By Thami Mazwai | June 17, 1991
A STUNNED world has watched black South Africans slaughter one another, little realizing that the blood bath is a desperate attempt by reactionaries to prevent, or at least delay, the day when the black majority gains control.Two groups diametrically opposed are working toward this end, but acting independently. Right-wing extremists and rogue elements in the security forces, the first group, are fueling the violence by supporting one faction against the other and even providing arms. Faceless, armed black men said to be in the pay of whites leave dozens dead behind them, week after week.
NEWS
November 30, 1994
A national group organized to get more black women elected to political posts is set to open a new chapter in Annapolis.The National Political Congress of Black Women, a nonprofit, nonpartisan group, has scheduled an organizational meeting tonight at City Hall."
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | November 1, 1994
WHO IS THE most powerful black political figure in Baltimore history? Among the elected officials: Parren Mitchell? Kurt Schmoke? Clarence "Du" Burns? Among those behind the scenes: William ("Little Willie") Adams? Larry Gibson? Thomas "Tom" R. Smith?Who is Tom Smith? Why just one of the most powerful black political bosses in Baltimore history. On election days in the 1920s and 30s, white politicians would turn to him to help roundup the black vote for the Democrats. That was at a time when most blacks were Republicans.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.