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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 16, 1996
Baltimore Police Maj. Wendell M. France, head of the homicide unit, has been elected chairman of the National Black Police Association, which represents 35,000 officers in 35 states.Major France, a 26-year veteran who is commander of the crimes against persons section, will serve two years as chairman, a job he will perform in his spare time. He is a past president of the Vanguard Justice Society, which represents black Baltimore officers.The police association was organized in 1972 to create a network among minority officers.
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NEWS
By Cpl. Kam Cooke | August 26, 2014
African American Officers of the Anne Arundel County Police Department were shocked and taken back by the donation to the defense fund for Officer Darren Wilson of Ferguson, Mo., by the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 70 Board of Directors. While we appreciate the support that the union offers to officers in need, there comes a time where leaders must take a step back and look at the totality of their decisions. This decision appeared to lack any regard for the many men and women of color, and even others with regard to the topic of Ferguson, Mo. The fact is that no criminal charges have been filed, and the facts of the case have not been fully released.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 23, 1996
The Douglass High School jazz band cranked out a smooth melody as throngs of well-wishers crowded the Roy Wilkins Auditorium at the NAACP's Mount Hope Drive headquarters. Near the front, dressed in a conservative gray suit, stood the man of the hour Maj. Wendell France.The 26-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department shook hands, chatted amicably and accepted congratulations as the newly elected chairman of the National Black Police Association. A graduate of Lemmel Junior High School and Forest Park Senior High School, Major France is the latest in a growing list of West Baltimore boys Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, Del. Elijah E. Cummings, NAACP head Kweisi Mfume who grew up in the '50s and '60s and rose to prominent positions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Bishop Lee Robinson Sr., the city's first African-American police commissioner who began his 50-year law enforcement career with the Baltimore Park Police and went on to lead two state agencies, died Monday of Alzheimer's disease and dementia at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Homeland resident was 86. After steadily rising through the ranks of the city Police Department, Mr. Robinson was named commissioner in 1984 by then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer. He went on to become the state's secretary of public safety and correctional services in Mr. Schaefer's administration and was secretary of juvenile justice under Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | January 6, 1993
In a deal that settles a racial discrimination lawsuit, the city o Frederick has agreed to hire at least one black police officer for every nonblack hired until its force is about 13 percent African-American.The agreement, to be announced today, is between the city and the nonprofit Public Justice Center. It settles a 1991 suit brought against Frederick police by Willie J. Mahone, a Frederick attorney. Mr. Mahone alleged that the almost all-white police force routinely stopped and searched blacks without probable cause.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2000
Planning a celebration some say is long overdue, a consortium of community groups and leaders announced yesterday that it will honor the 85 black police officers who have served in the Annapolis Police Department since the department was integrated in 1960. The theme of the ceremony, to be held Dec. 7 at the Stanton Community Center, is "Lest We Forget." It will include the unveiling of a plaque, to be housed in the Banneker Douglas Museum, that lists the names of the black officers who have served on the force.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
Andrew Young Jr. said it was bad enough that his leg was in a cast and that his body was battered and bruised at the hands of District of Columbia police officers."
NEWS
By From staff reports | July 15, 1998
Maryland District Court Chief Judge Martha Rasin said yesterday she has "no intention" of proposing a site for the city's 3rd District courthouse that is outside South Baltimore.The courthouse, an idea that has languished for 15 years, was to have been built on a state-owned parcel in Brooklyn, but recent tests showed methane in the ground, forcing Rasin and the Department of General Services to look for a new site.Rasin had said Monday that "we may need to put the courthouse in a different part of the city" -- a comment that angered some legislators.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and JoAnna Daemmrich and Peter Hermann and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1997
The embattled Baltimore police colonel who sparked an uproar by calling his boss a racist was stripped of one of the most powerful commands on the force yesterday and transferred to an obscure city agency.A lawyer for Col. Ronald L. Daniel, one of the highest-ranking black police commanders on the force, immediately filed an injunction in federal court to block the move. A hearing is scheduled for today.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke ordered the transfer, which Daniel's lawyers called a retaliatory demotion, after a day of meetings to try to resolve the feud that erupted in April and had again turned into a public spectacle.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 29, 1996
Here come these questions again: the ones that make me consider, even briefly, slashing my wrists. Or at the very least drinking enough booze until I find myself lying face down in a drunken stupor at a neighborhood bar.But I don't drink, so I have to suffer through questions like these. Serves me right for being a teetotaler.The questions come from an anonymous letter writer, postmarked Sept. 23 from an Eastern Shore ZIP code."I will sound like a racist but I really don't think I am," the writer cautioned.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
They walked in the rain, hundreds of them, police officers from all over the country. They passed by blighted blocks similar to what they're all too accustomed in their own cities. Police supervisors from California to New York didn't flinch as they marched Wednesday morning along East Biddle Street in a gathering meant to show solidarity with the community and with each other. They ended at a prayer service for fallen officers at Israel Baptist Church. New York police Lt. Marvin Louis has two brothers-in-law who live in Baltimore, but on this day he was here in uniform.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
City police investigators examined yesterday the computer hard drive used by a white commander accused of ordering a black sergeant to watch online Ku Klux Klan videos, according to three sources familiar with the investigation. Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for the Police Department and the mayor's office, said that the police commissioner briefed Mayor Sheila Dixon on Monday night and yesterday morning on a federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint stemming from the alleged incident, but he declined to comment further on the matter.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2004
James H. Watkins, owner of a Baltimore-based security agency who in the 1970s became the second-highest-ranking African-American in the city Police Department, died of complications from diabetes Dec. 1 at his Mount Washington home. He was 79. Born in Baltimore and raised on Presstman Street, he attended city public schools and as a boy held jobs delivering The Sun and working at Carter's Bakery on nearby Gilmor Street. He served in the Army and earned the rank of master sergeant. While in the service, he received his General Educational Development certificate.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
Members of the Vanguard Justice Society, which represents black city police officers, criticized the organization's leadership because several candidates were excluded yesterday from the group's elections. "We have dues-paying members who are puzzled and don't know what is going on," said Detective Irvin Bradley, a former president of the group. "I'm in disbelief. The members are highly upset. ... We wanted a fair election." Leaders of the Vanguard Justice Society, which represents about 600 black city police officers, declined to say why they deleted the names of three outspoken members from ballots.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2001
Armond Charles Elliott, a retired Baltimore County police officer who was lauded for saving the lives of twin brothers he pulled from the path of a speeding train, died Thursday of complications of a stroke at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. He was 80. The longtime Essex resident was among the county Police Department's first African-American officers when he, Frances Jackson and James Johnson were appointed in 1951. They later served together in the traffic division. During his 20-year career, Mr. Elliott received nine commendations and two special citations for saving the lives of Tommy and Timmy Mercure.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2001
Baltimore police have new leadership, new uniforms and new strategies to combat crime. Now they are about to embark on their boldest cosmetic change in three decades: a new color scheme for their police cruisers. The white Ford Crown Victorias and Chevrolet Caprices -- emblazoned with a blue and gray horizontal stripe -- could soon become black, with "POLICE" written in large yellow-trimmed white letters up the side, complemented by a blue stripe the length of the car and a large badge.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 2, 2000
BECAUSE HE IS not naive regarding the power of race in America, Martin O'Malley knew one thing going into his new job as the white mayor of Baltimore: He needed a black police commissioner to take some of the heat. This is because, in the continuing suspicion black people and white people have for each other, and our continuing instinct to weigh the political arithmetic of race, and to ascribe racial motives to every public gesture, we imagine conspiracies based on skin color even if none is intended.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
The Baltimore Police Department violated federal civil rights laws, punishing black officers more harshly than whites and retaliating against those who complained, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has determined.Current and former black officers could use the EEOC report as the basis for lawsuits against the city alleging racial discrimination.EEOC officials came to the conclusions while reviewing complaints filed by former Sgt. Louis H. Hopson Jr. The officer, who is black, was fired this year after a police trial board concluded he had made a false statement during a trial in Baltimore Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2000
Planning a celebration some say is long overdue, a consortium of community groups and leaders announced yesterday that it will honor the 85 black police officers who have served in the Annapolis Police Department since the department was integrated in 1960. The theme of the ceremony, to be held Dec. 7 at the Stanton Community Center, is "Lest We Forget." It will include the unveiling of a plaque, to be housed in the Banneker Douglas Museum, that lists the names of the black officers who have served on the force.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2000
Planning a celebration some say is long overdue, a consortium of community groups and leaders announced yesterday that they will honor the 85 black police officers who have served in the Annapolis Police Department since the department was integrated in 1960. The theme of the ceremony, to be held Dec. 7 at the Stanton Community Center, is "Lest We Forget." It will include the unveiling of a plaque, to be housed in the Banneker Douglas Museum, that lists the names of the black officers who have served on the force.
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