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By GREGORY KANE | October 28, 2006
Paul Coates pondered each question I asked him, taking half a minute or so before he answered. His answers were measured, articulate and intelligent. Just the Coates I remembered from the days when he was the captain of the Baltimore chapter of the Black Panther Party. This month Coates was in Oakland, Calif., celebrating the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party. It was the latest of several gatherings that reunited former members of the organization that Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Arthur Turco had defended members of the Black Panther Party across the country, but it was in Baltimore that he would be arrested and jailed - on charges that he and members of the militant group had killed a suspected police informant within their ranks in 1969. After a year in Baltimore's jail and a mistrial, Turco said he was offered a deal: plead guilty to a misdemeanor and go free on time served. After discussing it with his associate, William Kunstler - the radical lawyer who defended such brazen civil disobedients as the Chicago Seven and the Attica prison inmates - they decided to take the offer and run. "'Let's just get the hell out of Baltimore,'" Turco remembers the famed lawyer saying.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2004
COMING UP Afeni Shakur, mother of the late rapper Tupac, will make an appearance tomorrow in support of her recently released memoir, Evolution of a Revolutionary. A former officer in the Black Panther Party and now CEO of Amaru Entertainment / Records, Shakur will hold a discussion and book signing at the Baltimore School for the Arts, where her son attended class from 1986 until 1988. The event begins at 5 p.m. The Baltimore School for the Arts is at 712 Cathedral St. Call 410-625-0403 or visit www.bsfa.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 28, 2006
Paul Coates pondered each question I asked him, taking half a minute or so before he answered. His answers were measured, articulate and intelligent. Just the Coates I remembered from the days when he was the captain of the Baltimore chapter of the Black Panther Party. This month Coates was in Oakland, Calif., celebrating the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party. It was the latest of several gatherings that reunited former members of the organization that Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Arthur Turco had defended members of the Black Panther Party across the country, but it was in Baltimore that he would be arrested and jailed - on charges that he and members of the militant group had killed a suspected police informant within their ranks in 1969. After a year in Baltimore's jail and a mistrial, Turco said he was offered a deal: plead guilty to a misdemeanor and go free on time served. After discussing it with his associate, William Kunstler - the radical lawyer who defended such brazen civil disobedients as the Chicago Seven and the Attica prison inmates - they decided to take the offer and run. "'Let's just get the hell out of Baltimore,'" Turco remembers the famed lawyer saying.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 28, 1996
The anniversary -- a 25th -- came and went without notice, what with the Republicans finishing their convention, the Democrats starting theirs and the National Association of Black Journalists hobnobbing in Nashville.But it was 25 years ago Aug. 21 that George Jackson was killed while trying to escape from San Quentin prison in California. Most Americans no doubt thought they had rid themselves of a dangerous Marxist radical, a member of the militant and violent Black Panther Party who had murdered one prison guard at Soledad Penitentiary and two more -- plus three inmates -- in the escape attempt at San Quentin.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,sun staff | September 28, 1997
"Reaching Beyond Race," Paul M. Sniderman and Edward G. Carmines. Harvard University Press. 192 pages. $22.95.Paul M. Sniderman and Edward G. Carmines are political science professors at, respectively, Stanford University and Indiana University. It shows in their book. That's not a compliment.Oh, they mean well. And it's good that university and college professors try to find some way to help America out of its racial quagmire. As W.E.B. DuBois pointed out in "Black Reconstruction," college and university professors did so much to help us into it.And the authors have a good premise: If we would only "reach beyond race," we will pull ourselves from the racial morass.
NEWS
By Askia Muhammad | June 9, 1994
THAT AN attempt to assassinate former Louis Farrakhan aide Khalid Abdul Muhammad should have occurred in California is no surprise to attentive observers of the Nation of Islam.When I was a student minister in Mr. Muhammad's Mosque No. 26 in San Francisco in the early 1970s, we referred to our region as "The Wild, Wild West" for good reason: We were like rebellious children who felt we knew better than anyone anywhere else how to interpret and live out the strict teaching given by the Hon. Elijah Muhammad.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - It began with the Magnificent Montague. He was a disc jockey on KGFJ, 1230 on your AM dial, back in the days of Supremes and Miracles, Sam Cooke singing "You Send Me" and James Brown testifying about papa's brand new bag. KGFJ was the very heartbeat of black Los Angeles, and Nathaniel Montague one of its signature voices. He was an excitable type and when a record hit him just right, when rhythm met blues in that sweet spot that makes you close your eyes and snap your fingers, he had this pet phrase.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | November 10, 2001
BEFORE tying up a few loose ends, let's look at another member of the new peace movement. The first one was A. Robert Kaufman, the curmudgeonly Trotskyite activist who's been known to irritate even his fellow left-wingers. Well, better them than us. The Rev. Chester Wickwire irritated mainly conservatives during his tenure as chaplain at the Johns Hopkins University. The reasons he did show just how staid, reactionary and downright wrong conservatives were in years past. Wickwire ran into opposition early on at Hopkins.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - It began with the Magnificent Montague. He was a disc jockey on KGFJ, 1230 on your AM dial, back in the days of Supremes and Miracles, Sam Cooke singing "You Send Me" and James Brown testifying about papa's brand new bag. KGFJ was the very heartbeat of black Los Angeles, and Nathaniel Montague one of its signature voices. He was an excitable type and when a record hit him just right, when rhythm met blues in that sweet spot that makes you close your eyes and snap your fingers, he had this pet phrase.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2004
COMING UP Afeni Shakur, mother of the late rapper Tupac, will make an appearance tomorrow in support of her recently released memoir, Evolution of a Revolutionary. A former officer in the Black Panther Party and now CEO of Amaru Entertainment / Records, Shakur will hold a discussion and book signing at the Baltimore School for the Arts, where her son attended class from 1986 until 1988. The event begins at 5 p.m. The Baltimore School for the Arts is at 712 Cathedral St. Call 410-625-0403 or visit www.bsfa.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | November 10, 2001
BEFORE tying up a few loose ends, let's look at another member of the new peace movement. The first one was A. Robert Kaufman, the curmudgeonly Trotskyite activist who's been known to irritate even his fellow left-wingers. Well, better them than us. The Rev. Chester Wickwire irritated mainly conservatives during his tenure as chaplain at the Johns Hopkins University. The reasons he did show just how staid, reactionary and downright wrong conservatives were in years past. Wickwire ran into opposition early on at Hopkins.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,sun staff | September 28, 1997
"Reaching Beyond Race," Paul M. Sniderman and Edward G. Carmines. Harvard University Press. 192 pages. $22.95.Paul M. Sniderman and Edward G. Carmines are political science professors at, respectively, Stanford University and Indiana University. It shows in their book. That's not a compliment.Oh, they mean well. And it's good that university and college professors try to find some way to help America out of its racial quagmire. As W.E.B. DuBois pointed out in "Black Reconstruction," college and university professors did so much to help us into it.And the authors have a good premise: If we would only "reach beyond race," we will pull ourselves from the racial morass.
NEWS
By Talibah L. Chikwendu | September 20, 1996
I DIDN'T KNOW who Tupac Shakur was until I saw the movie ''Poetic Justice'' a few years ago. Until then, I had not heard his name. Needless to say, I didn't make the trek to Brooklyn for his memorial service. I understand it was an intimate crowd; probably consisting of people who knew him when, as opposed to people who know about him now. I'm sure it was a sad occasion and I offer my prayers to his family. It is painful to lose a loved one, especially to violence.But I'm beside myself at the message of the Rev. Herbert Daughtry of the House of Lord Pentecostal Church.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 28, 1996
The anniversary -- a 25th -- came and went without notice, what with the Republicans finishing their convention, the Democrats starting theirs and the National Association of Black Journalists hobnobbing in Nashville.But it was 25 years ago Aug. 21 that George Jackson was killed while trying to escape from San Quentin prison in California. Most Americans no doubt thought they had rid themselves of a dangerous Marxist radical, a member of the militant and violent Black Panther Party who had murdered one prison guard at Soledad Penitentiary and two more -- plus three inmates -- in the escape attempt at San Quentin.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
Students of 1960s history will remember Eldridge Cleaver as the young revolutionary in the black beret, the spokesman for the Black Panthers, the prison-educated Marxist with a gun who believed the only way to oppose police violence was to shoot back.Now listen to this:"Truly, the United States of America is the free-est and the most democratic country in the world. . . . I love this country."That was Eldridge Cleaver speaking yesterday at Anne Arundel Community College, 26 years after he fled the country after a shootout with police in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
By Talibah L. Chikwendu | September 20, 1996
I DIDN'T KNOW who Tupac Shakur was until I saw the movie ''Poetic Justice'' a few years ago. Until then, I had not heard his name. Needless to say, I didn't make the trek to Brooklyn for his memorial service. I understand it was an intimate crowd; probably consisting of people who knew him when, as opposed to people who know about him now. I'm sure it was a sad occasion and I offer my prayers to his family. It is painful to lose a loved one, especially to violence.But I'm beside myself at the message of the Rev. Herbert Daughtry of the House of Lord Pentecostal Church.
NEWS
By Askia Muhammad | June 9, 1994
THAT AN attempt to assassinate former Louis Farrakhan aide Khalid Abdul Muhammad should have occurred in California is no surprise to attentive observers of the Nation of Islam.When I was a student minister in Mr. Muhammad's Mosque No. 26 in San Francisco in the early 1970s, we referred to our region as "The Wild, Wild West" for good reason: We were like rebellious children who felt we knew better than anyone anywhere else how to interpret and live out the strict teaching given by the Hon. Elijah Muhammad.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
Students of 1960s history will remember Eldridge Cleaver as the young revolutionary in the black beret, the spokesman for the Black Panthers, the prison-educated Marxist with a gun who believed the only way to oppose police violence was to shoot back.Now listen to this:"Truly, the United States of America is the free-est and the most democratic country in the world. . . . I love this country."That was Eldridge Cleaver speaking yesterday at Anne Arundel Community College, 26 years after he fled the country after a shootout with police in Oakland, Calif.
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