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By GREGORY KANE | February 4, 1998
These local theater folks in Baltimore have no shortage of guts. First, Center Stage tackles Lorraine Hansberry's "Les Blancs," a controversial play about race relations. Then the Arena Players get in on the act by staging a controversial play of their own."Servant of the People" has its East Coast premiere Friday. It is a tale of the meteoric rise, pitiful decline and ultimately sickening crash of the Black Panther Party. The play promises to cause as much of an uproar as the Hollywood film "Panther" did a few years ago, but for a different reason.
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NEWS
October 2, 2014
Eric H. Holder has indeed left behind an impressive legacy ( "The Holder legacy Sept. 28). As the nation's top law-enforcement officer he has refused to follow or enforce the law. Here is his legacy: He allowed the IRS to target conservative groups and ignore congressional subpoenas, then stood by when the agency "lost" emails by Lois Lerner and others to thwart the investigation. He allowed the State Department and the executive branch to ignore subpoenas in the Benghazi investigation and disallowed the interviewing of witnesses by Congress.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
By the time Richard M. Smith was born 21 years ago, Bobby Seale -- co-founder and chairman of the Black Panther Party -- had already quit the organization that helped create the unsettling, startling image of African-Americans advocating violent revolution. Smith, the president of Western Maryland College's Black Student Union -- and who was instrumental in arranging Seale's appearance on campus today -- encountered the Black Panthers in the eighth grade. What he heard about them was this: "That there was a militant group who didn't like white people," he recalled with a laugh.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Arthur Turco had defended members of the Black Panther Party across the country, but it was in Baltimore that he would be arrested and jailed - on charges that he and members of the militant group had killed a suspected police informant within their ranks in 1969. After a year in Baltimore's jail and a mistrial, Turco said he was offered a deal: plead guilty to a misdemeanor and go free on time served. After discussing it with his associate, William Kunstler - the radical lawyer who defended such brazen civil disobedients as the Chicago Seven and the Attica prison inmates - they decided to take the offer and run. "'Let's just get the hell out of Baltimore,'" Turco remembers the famed lawyer saying.
NEWS
By ADAM HOCHSCHILD | June 4, 1995
San Francisco -- Everybody seems to be reconsidering the 1960s. First Robert McNamara says the Vietnam War was wrong after all.And now a new movie, "Panther," directed by Mario Van Peebles from a screenplay by his father, Melvin Van Peebles, glorifies the Black Panther Party.I was in the anti-war movement. I was also a civil rights worker in Mississippi. I'm proud on both counts.There were a lot of great things about the '60s that we need to rediscover and praise. But the Black Panther Party was not one of them.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
Western Maryland College will hold activities throughout February in recognition of Black History Month, including a lecture by Black Panther Party co-founder and chairman Bobby Seale, a gospel jubilee and a soul food dinner. The events are open to the public and are sponsored by the Black Student Union, the College Activities Programming Board and the Office of Multicultural Student Services. All activities are free, unless otherwise indicated. Tomorrow: "Wonders of the African World" Part I, 7 p.m., BSU Clubroom; viewing and discussion of the PBS documentary series.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 2, 1998
Eldridge Cleaver, whose searing prison memoir "Soul on Ice" and leadership in the Black Panther Party made him a symbol of black rebellion in the turbulent 1960s, died yesterday in Pomona, Calif., at the age of 62.At the request of his family, a spokeswoman for the Pomona Valley Hospital Center, Leslie Porras, declined to provide the cause of death or the reason Cleaver was in the hospital.In the black leather coat and beret the Panthers wore as a uniform, Cleaver was a tall, bearded, articulate figure who mesmerized his radical audiences with his fierce energy, intellect and often bitter humor.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
Drawing outrage from the city police union leader, a Baltimore judge granted a new sentencing hearing yesterday for a Black Panther member convicted 30 years ago of carrying out an ambush attack and killing a police officer. Jack Ivory Johnson Jr., 53, who was sentenced in 1972 to life plus 15 years, could argue for release from prison at the new hearing, which is scheduled for Nov. 20. Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph P. McCurdy granted Johnson's request for resentencing, pointing to what he called an error by the original trial judge three decades ago. Several police officers are planning to go to the November hearing, said Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police President Gary McLhinney, who was furious about the ruling.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 30, 1996
Roger Guenveur Smith knows that the Huey P. Newton most of us remember is a one-dimensional figure -- the angry revolutionary with a rifle in hand and a bandoleer across his chest.But to Smith, whose one-man show, "A Huey P. Newton Story," opens tomorrow at Center Stage, the late co-founder of the Black Panther Party is "a tragic hero of Shakespearean dimensions. In a sense, he's my Hamlet."Smith believes that Newton, like Hamlet, is a man of many contradictions: "In 1966 he founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense with Bobby Seale, and he did that on the streets of Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
Baltimore's police commissioner and nearly 50 of his officers packed a city courtroom yesterday, successfully imploring a judge to reject the plea for freedom of a former Black Panther member convicted of killing a city patrolman nearly 33 years ago. Jack Ivory Johnson Jr., 53, who with two other Black Panther members ambushed and repeatedly shot Donald T. Sager as he sat in his patrol car on a West Baltimore street in 1970, argued yesterday that more...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Ian Duncan and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former Black Panther leader Marshall "Eddie" Conway walked free Tuesday after spending four decades behind bars for killing a Baltimore police officer - making his one of the highest-profile cases affected by a high court decision that has cut short prison sentences for dozens of felons in recent years. Conway, now 67, always said that he was innocent, alleging political motives in the prosecution of a 1970 shooting that killed Officer Donald Sager, 35, and injured another officer.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
While the entire George Zimmerman/Tryavon Martin issue is a tragedy on many fronts, I am outraged by the lack of action from the mainstream media and law enforcement concerning the bounty on Mr. Zimmerman offered by the Black Panthers. I am not a legal expert, but this should be a crime. The lack of reporting by the media and the inaction taken by authorities shows that if a group is of the preferred, politically correct ethnic background, they can do whatever they want with no fear of repercussion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 29, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National • War in Libya costs $600 million in first wee k. (Sarah Palin falsely claims it costs $600M a day.) (ABC News) • In a dubious challenge to President Obama, Donald Trump publicly released his birth certificate. Turns out, though, it wasn't even an official copy . (The Smoking Gun)
NEWS
February 9, 2009
WARREN KIMBRO, 74 Former Black Panther headed rehabilitation program for ex-convicts Warren Kimbro, a former Black Panther whose 1969 murder of a suspected informant brought on the unsuccessful prosecution of party co-founder Bobby Seale in one of an unruly era's most raucous episodes, died Tuesday in New Haven, Conn., where he rebuilt his life as head of a rehabilitation program for ex-felons. The cause was believed to be a heart attack, according to Douglas Rae, a Yale School of Management professor who knew Mr. Kimbro for two decades and co-wrote a book about him. On May 20, 1969, Mr. Kimbro fatally shot Alex Rackley, a 19-year-old Black Panther member who party members believed was an FBI informant.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,james.drew@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
Kathleen Klein Shemer, who worked as a buyer at several Baltimore department stores before she became active in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, died of complications from an illness Thursday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Pikesville resident was 91. Born in Pittsburgh, she graduated from James Madison High School in Brooklyn, N.Y. She moved to Baltimore in the 1940s and was a volunteer nursing assistant during World War II. She worked as a buyer at Hecht's, Brager-Gutman's and other department stores in the city.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | February 3, 2008
The man who co-founded the Black Panther Party more than 40 years ago is still rabble-rousing. But nowadays, Bobby Seale is not only venting verbiage at "The Man" or "the system" or crooked politicians that conspire to keep the masses down. Among his recent targets are those who exploit and undermine the fine art of -- get this -- barbecuing. Consider this verbose Barbecue Bill of Rights that's posted on Seale's barbecuing Web site, bobbyqueseale.com: "When in the course of human development it becomes necessary for us, the citizens of the earth, to creatively improve the culinary art of barbe-que'n in our opposition to the overly commercialized bondage of `cue-be-rab' (barbecuing backwards)
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
Eldridge Cleaver missed his chance at martyrdom. If he had died in the 1968 shootout with Oakland police, he would probably have become a revered icon.We'd forever see him in his glory, a beautiful black man staring out from the cover of "Soul on Ice," a revolutionary wearing a black leather jacket and shades, an uncompromising intellectual standing beside bullet-riddled posters of himself and Huey P. Newton.That didn't happen. Bobby Hutton, 17, died in the shootout April 6, 1968. Cleaver went on to run for president and later jump bail.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Visitors to Maryland's newest park can forget their grills and lawn chairs, but they'd better bring wet suits. That's because the "park" is at the bottom of the Potomac River -- a sunken World War II-era German submarine.Today, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and assorted dignitaries will dedicate the U-1105 Black Panther Historic Shipwreck Preserve off Piney Point in St. Mary's County. A mile offshore in about 85 feet of murky water, the 51-year-old submarine is Maryland's first diving preserve and one of fewer than 20 such preserves in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2007
FESTIVAL THE LUCK OF THE IRISH Experience Irish culture to the fullest this weekend at the 31st annual Maryland Irish Festival. See live performances from nationally recognized Celtic musical groups, including James Gallagher and Off the Boat, Seven Nations, Barleyjuice and Eileen Ivers; watch Irish dance performances from local Irish dance schools and take Irish step-dancing lessons; or get a taste of Ireland with traditional Irish dishes, including Irish stew, fish and chips, and corned beef.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | October 5, 2007
Bringing a new dimension to Free Fall Baltimore, the Maryland Film Festival is offering free 3-D film screenings Wednesdays through Oct. 24. Next week's offering is John Brahm's The Mad Magician (1954), starring Vincent Price as Don Gallico, aka Gallico the Great, whose only goal in life is to gain vengeance on his evil employer, who has a habit of stealing the magic tricks Gallico designs and selling them to rival illusionists. (Yes, Price is essentially reprising the madman he brought to 3-D screens in 1953's House of Wax, but why quibble over such masterful redundancies?
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